Trudeau 'welcomes' ethics probe of alleged PMO interference in SNC-Lavalin case

bob the dog

Electoral Member
Aug 14, 2020
885
694
93
Big thing Liberals are trying to hide is that they don't know what they are doing. Clearly over their heads imo

They know how to run election campaigns. Government not so much.

The whole thing mirrors the story of the first generation entrepreneur building a business only to see successive generations run it into the ground. Trudeaus delusion is that he is acting on behalf of all Canadians.
 

Retired_Can_Soldier

Rock Hard Member
Mar 19, 2006
10,929
78
48
56
Alberta
They would be wise to avoid an election that can't possibly win?


Sometimes voters punish a government for taking them into an election they don't want. Trudeau was banking on an election because he doesn't want the public to know anything about his dealings with WE. This investigation needs to be wrapped up. This is just a repeat performance of SNC Lavelin. Morneau was sacrificed to save Trudeau's butt. He avoided an election he very much wanted to escape the scrutiny of the investigations. The filibustering by those seated on the Liberal side of the committee is clear cut obstruction of justice.




I hope they nail the phony feminist, bully prick to the cross.
 
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Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
15,483
674
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Regina, Saskatchewan
In their default position of "Openness & Transparency" http://liberal.ca/only-trudeau-offering-plan-for-open-and-transparent-government/


Parliamentary budget officer rebukes Trudeau government over spending secrecy (Say it isn't so!)

http://nationalpost.com/news/politi...perly-fulfill-its-government-watchdog-mandate

Parliament's budget watchdog has called out the Trudeau government for not providing information on billions of dollars in planned federal spending. The parliamentary budget office made clear its concerns about the Liberals' spending secrecy in two separate reports released Wednesday.

The first accused the government of having failed to provide detailed information in its recent request to Parliament for $79 billion in added spending authority. While the government says most of the money is intended for COVID-19 relief, the PBO suggested Parliament's ability to oversee government spending has been hamstrung by the Liberals' secrecy.

"While the sum of these measures is significant, the amount of information that is publicly available to track this spending is lacking, thus making it more challenging for parliamentarians to perform their critical role in overseeing government spending and holding it to account," reads the report. The budget office went on to note that the Liberals have yet to provide a complete list of COVID-19 measures announced so far, or updated estimates on how much those measures will cost.

"This lack of data is not a result of it not being available," the PBO report added. "The Department of Finance had been providing biweekly updates to the standing committee on finance, but stopped when Parliament was prorogued in August."

The budget office has taken it upon itself in recent months to start tracking the estimated costs of the government's COVID-19 relief, with the most recent tally coming in at more than $176 billion this year. Anyway....the rest at the above LINK...

 

Twin_Moose

Hall of Fame Member
Apr 17, 2017
17,725
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The titled article is interesting but what I found at the bottom of it was eye opening

U.S. working on deal allowing Huawei’s Meng Wanzhou to return to China: reports


Deferred prosecution agreements are usually negotiated for corporations rather than individuals, allowing businesses to avoid criminal charges in exchange for significantly reduced penalties. Typically, companies still have to plead guilty to wrongdoing under such deals.

In Canada, SNC-Lavalin ultimately struck a similar deal with federal prosecutors in 2019 that allowed the engineering giant to avoid criminal charges of corruption. The company still plead guilty to fraud and agreed to pay a fine of $280 million over five years, along with a three-year probation.

Negotiations over a deferred prosecution agreement ultimately sparked the SNC-Lavalin affair that ensnared Trudeau's government through early 2019.....More
 

Jinentonix

Executive Branch Member
Sep 6, 2015
8,637
2,337
113
Olympus Mons
An election is the ultimate answering to the people in a democracy.

Do you even listen to the rubbish you spew?

You want us to believe that the opposition should be able question every dollar spent by the government AND have confidence in that government?

Your bullshit overfloweth
Tries to show how smart he is by giving a lesson on what democracy is. Completely ignores the fact that govt accountability BETWEEN elections is also a major part of a true democracy.
Example, the goof ball's press secretary was nailed for conflict of interest and fined $250. This is problem #1 with the system. Being caught in a conflict of interest at the junior civil service level is automatic grounds for dismissal.
By the way, how many ethics violations has this govt racked up in just 5 years? The Liberals might as well change their name to the "No Ethics No Morals Party of Canada"
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
15,483
674
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
‘In that moment, I knew he wanted me to lie.’ Jody Wilson-Raybould recalls a tension-filled meeting with Justin Trudeau
1631378006144.jpeg
Jody Wilson-Raybould most recently served as the independent Member of Parliament for Vancouver Granville. The following is excerpted from her latest book, ‘Indian’ in the Cabinet: Speaking Truth to Power, which will be published Tuesday.

As I sat there in that room – a big room, all by myself – waiting for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to arrive, I asked myself why I felt that I had to try to help him out of this mess, to protect him. Especially when his government had been digging a deeper and deeper hole by the hour by not coming clean on how I was pushed to take over the prosecution of SNC-Lavalin to enable them to enter into a deferred prosecution agreement, or DPA. Especially when his office had been telling their MPs to repeat lines they knew were not accurate.

I was anxious as I sat there. I could feel my lingering hope that I would be proven wrong and that everything was not as terrible as it seemed. I wished that the government would just admit their wrongdoing and deal with it openly and transparently. I knew the only way to deal with it was to tell the truth. Full transparency. It was as clear to me as sunlight. The Prime Minister had to simply acknowledge that the attempts to apply pressure were not proper and take concrete steps to address the wrong actions. Deep down I think I knew better than to expect him to own up. However, at that moment, I still wanted to give him the benefit of the doubt. http://apple.news/AUiGUCfMcREuNbr8LpfZGvQ

There is no question in my mind that the Prime Minister knew there were attempts to pressure me to avoid a criminal prosecution of SNC-Lavalin, and while those attempts failed, thankfully, they were wrong and he knew it. Instead of simply addressing the issue publicly and accurately, the government was sending out talking heads – the new attorney-general, David Lametti; Marco Mendicino; Arif Virani – to make comments that evidence has now shown were not accurate or right. I told him that he should be telling Canadians the truth.

The Prime Minister seemed to be listening intently. “I never directed,” he said, referring to interfering in my role as the attorney-general in relation to the SNC-Lavalin prosecution. His public lines started coming, which were designed to deny responsibility and culpability. There are differences between pressure and direction, he emphasized. We talked about our soon to be infamous meeting with the clerk of the Privy Council on September 17, 2018, where I had asked him directly, when SNC-Lavalin was raised, “Are you politically interfering with my role, my decision as the attorney-general? I would strongly advise against it.” He repeated in that airport room that I was not shuffled from being minister of justice and attorney-general because of SNC-Lavalin. To which I thought to myself, Oh yes, I remember Scott Brison resigned from Treasury, so, of course, you then had to move the attorney-general and two other ministers and elevate two MPs to fill one spot. Good grief. http://apple.news/AUiGUCfMcREuNbr8LpfZGvQ

As he went on, I suddenly blurted out, “I don’t want you to say anything further about what happened after September 17.” To this day, I am still surprised I said that. I know why I did it and why I wanted him to stop talking – I was trying to leave space open for a constructive solution to the mess the PM and his office had created and that, in my overly optimistic opinion, could still be found. Either the Prime Minister knew everything that had happened and did not care and was clearly lying to me and the country, or he did not know what had been happening during the months after September 17 to try to exert pressure on me and was not in control of his office. He was either complicit or incompetent.
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
15,483
674
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
Wilson-Raybould said that during those conversations, Trudeau was pushing her to lie about how his team had handled the situation. http://apple.news/Av1X37d7vT_6NCe2c2_bX_Q

“I knew what he was really asking. What he was saying. In that moment, I knew he wanted me to lie – to attest that what had occurred had not occurred,” Wilson-Raybould said.

When pressed on the allegation during a Saturday press conference, Trudeau rejected it.

In 2019, the federal ethics commissioner found that Trudeau had violated conflict of interest rules by attempting to interfere in the corruption case against Quebec engineering giant SNC-Lavalin.

“I did not want her to lie. I would never do that. I would never ask her that,” he said. “That is simply not true.”

“It is unfortunate when people who believe in a say, a similar optimistic vision for the country, end up moving in different directions and end up disagreeing. That’s no fun. It’s not something anyone wants to have to go through,” he said.

Meanwhile, the Conservatives have pounced on the excerpt of Wilson-Raybould’s book, which is set to be published on Tuesday — less than a week before the federal election.

“It’s a reminder that Mr. Trudeau will say and do anything to win, and never has any intention of actually putting Canadians and the needs of the country first,” Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole said on Saturday, after being asked for his thoughts on the allegations.

“I have great respect for Ms. Wilson-Raybould, and I think her departure from politics is yet another sign that Mr. Trudeau has constantly, constantly let people down and misrepresented himself.”

NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh levelled a similar attack against Trudeau on Saturday.
“We’ve always believed what Ms. Jody Wilson-Raybould has had to say,” Singh said.

“We believe that that’s another example of this pattern of behavior that we’re seeing from Mr. Trudeau, of … kicking out strong women in his cabinet.”
 

JLM

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 27, 2008
75,105
467
83
Vernon, B.C.
Wilson-Raybould said that during those conversations, Trudeau was pushing her to lie about how his team had handled the situation. http://apple.news/Av1X37d7vT_6NCe2c2_bX_Q

“I knew what he was really asking. What he was saying. In that moment, I knew he wanted me to lie – to attest that what had occurred had not occurred,” Wilson-Raybould said.

When pressed on the allegation during a Saturday press conference, Trudeau rejected it.

In 2019, the federal ethics commissioner found that Trudeau had violated conflict of interest rules by attempting to interfere in the corruption case against Quebec engineering giant SNC-Lavalin.

“I did not want her to lie. I would never do that. I would never ask her that,” he said. “That is simply not true.”

“It is unfortunate when people who believe in a say, a similar optimistic vision for the country, end up moving in different directions and end up disagreeing. That’s no fun. It’s not something anyone wants to have to go through,” he said.

Meanwhile, the Conservatives have pounced on the excerpt of Wilson-Raybould’s book, which is set to be published on Tuesday — less than a week before the federal election.

“It’s a reminder that Mr. Trudeau will say and do anything to win, and never has any intention of actually putting Canadians and the needs of the country first,” Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole said on Saturday, after being asked for his thoughts on the allegations.

“I have great respect for Ms. Wilson-Raybould, and I think her departure from politics is yet another sign that Mr. Trudeau has constantly, constantly let people down and misrepresented himself.”

NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh levelled a similar attack against Trudeau on Saturday.
“We’ve always believed what Ms. Jody Wilson-Raybould has had to say,” Singh said.

“We believe that that’s another example of this pattern of behavior that we’re seeing from Mr. Trudeau, of … kicking out strong women in his cabinet.”
That guy really is a snake in the grass. Why are so many Canadians taken in by him? I've thought all along that Jody W-R should have been the P.M.
 
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spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
28,992
1,164
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‘In that moment, I knew he wanted me to lie.’ Jody Wilson-Raybould recalls a tension-filled meeting with Justin Trudeau
View attachment 9976
Jody Wilson-Raybould most recently served as the independent Member of Parliament for Vancouver Granville. The following is excerpted from her latest book, ‘Indian’ in the Cabinet: Speaking Truth to Power, which will be published Tuesday.

As I sat there in that room – a big room, all by myself – waiting for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to arrive, I asked myself why I felt that I had to try to help him out of this mess, to protect him. Especially when his government had been digging a deeper and deeper hole by the hour by not coming clean on how I was pushed to take over the prosecution of SNC-Lavalin to enable them to enter into a deferred prosecution agreement, or DPA. Especially when his office had been telling their MPs to repeat lines they knew were not accurate.

I was anxious as I sat there. I could feel my lingering hope that I would be proven wrong and that everything was not as terrible as it seemed. I wished that the government would just admit their wrongdoing and deal with it openly and transparently. I knew the only way to deal with it was to tell the truth. Full transparency. It was as clear to me as sunlight. The Prime Minister had to simply acknowledge that the attempts to apply pressure were not proper and take concrete steps to address the wrong actions. Deep down I think I knew better than to expect him to own up. However, at that moment, I still wanted to give him the benefit of the doubt. http://apple.news/AUiGUCfMcREuNbr8LpfZGvQ

There is no question in my mind that the Prime Minister knew there were attempts to pressure me to avoid a criminal prosecution of SNC-Lavalin, and while those attempts failed, thankfully, they were wrong and he knew it. Instead of simply addressing the issue publicly and accurately, the government was sending out talking heads – the new attorney-general, David Lametti; Marco Mendicino; Arif Virani – to make comments that evidence has now shown were not accurate or right. I told him that he should be telling Canadians the truth.

The Prime Minister seemed to be listening intently. “I never directed,” he said, referring to interfering in my role as the attorney-general in relation to the SNC-Lavalin prosecution. His public lines started coming, which were designed to deny responsibility and culpability. There are differences between pressure and direction, he emphasized. We talked about our soon to be infamous meeting with the clerk of the Privy Council on September 17, 2018, where I had asked him directly, when SNC-Lavalin was raised, “Are you politically interfering with my role, my decision as the attorney-general? I would strongly advise against it.” He repeated in that airport room that I was not shuffled from being minister of justice and attorney-general because of SNC-Lavalin. To which I thought to myself, Oh yes, I remember Scott Brison resigned from Treasury, so, of course, you then had to move the attorney-general and two other ministers and elevate two MPs to fill one spot. Good grief. http://apple.news/AUiGUCfMcREuNbr8LpfZGvQ

As he went on, I suddenly blurted out, “I don’t want you to say anything further about what happened after September 17.” To this day, I am still surprised I said that. I know why I did it and why I wanted him to stop talking – I was trying to leave space open for a constructive solution to the mess the PM and his office had created and that, in my overly optimistic opinion, could still be found. Either the Prime Minister knew everything that had happened and did not care and was clearly lying to me and the country, or he did not know what had been happening during the months after September 17 to try to exert pressure on me and was not in control of his office. He was either complicit or incompetent.
Wilson-Raybould said that during those conversations, Trudeau was pushing her to lie about how his team had handled the situation. http://apple.news/Av1X37d7vT_6NCe2c2_bX_Q

“I knew what he was really asking. What he was saying. In that moment, I knew he wanted me to lie – to attest that what had occurred had not occurred,” Wilson-Raybould said.

When pressed on the allegation during a Saturday press conference, Trudeau rejected it.

In 2019, the federal ethics commissioner found that Trudeau had violated conflict of interest rules by attempting to interfere in the corruption case against Quebec engineering giant SNC-Lavalin.

“I did not want her to lie. I would never do that. I would never ask her that,” he said. “That is simply not true.”

“It is unfortunate when people who believe in a say, a similar optimistic vision for the country, end up moving in different directions and end up disagreeing. That’s no fun. It’s not something anyone wants to have to go through,” he said.

Meanwhile, the Conservatives have pounced on the excerpt of Wilson-Raybould’s book, which is set to be published on Tuesday — less than a week before the federal election.

“It’s a reminder that Mr. Trudeau will say and do anything to win, and never has any intention of actually putting Canadians and the needs of the country first,” Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole said on Saturday, after being asked for his thoughts on the allegations.

“I have great respect for Ms. Wilson-Raybould, and I think her departure from politics is yet another sign that Mr. Trudeau has constantly, constantly let people down and misrepresented himself.”

NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh levelled a similar attack against Trudeau on Saturday.
“We’ve always believed what Ms. Jody Wilson-Raybould has had to say,” Singh said.

“We believe that that’s another example of this pattern of behavior that we’re seeing from Mr. Trudeau, of … kicking out strong women in his cabinet.”
shes lucky that she didnt end up with the residential school children. ;)
 
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Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
15,483
674
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
shes lucky that she didnt end up with the residential school children. ;)
Arkancide is a progressive American thing & though we’re talking left of centre justin-ification of dealing with a political problem, it doesn’t directly involve Hilary Clinton


1631386372266.jpeg
 

JLM

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 27, 2008
75,105
467
83
Vernon, B.C.
I think the day is close at hand when Justin finally realizes he should have been nice to and more truthful with Jody! Her credibility is about 100 times better than his! :)