FBI Raids Former President Donald Trump’s Home

Tecumsehsbones

Hall of Fame Member
Mar 18, 2013
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Nope....unlike you and your ilk that have predetermined Trumps guilt.
Any "good" lawyer like you knows that it is innocent until proven guilty, right?
I see the problem. You think this board is a court of law.

Well, I guess if you're that delusional, I can see how you arrive at some of the conclusions you do.
 

Tecumsehsbones

Hall of Fame Member
Mar 18, 2013
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Maybe in the court of public opinion. But this happens all the time. He won't be the first or the last for this to happen to. It's a sad commentary on the 'public'.
Not really. Me, I evaluate "evidence" based on its soundness. Most folk these days evaluate it on how it lines up with their team (I would say "politics," but people don't have politics anymore. That requires consistent adherence to a set of principles).
 

IdRatherBeSkiing

Satelitte Radio Addict
May 28, 2007
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Not really. Me, I evaluate "evidence" based on its soundness. Most folk these days evaluate it on how it lines up with their team (I would say "politics," but people don't have politics anymore. That requires consistent adherence to a set of principles).
I observe this phenomenon on regular news stories as well. People judge based upon what is thrown at them by the news reader reading the copy.
 

Dixie Cup

House Member
Sep 16, 2006
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“In light of what we now know regarding wrongful prosecution and conviction rates in this country, we must face the harsh reality that our criminal justice system is not just fallible,” Rudolf writes, with a book’s worth of examples to back up his claim. “It suffers from systemic, inherent faults and abuses of power by police and prosecutors — abuses of power that routinely produce erroneous convictions of innocent people.”

Leave aside this action by the Biden justice department — and for that matter, any number of examples from the Trump and Obama and Bush and Clinton justice departments. When criminal justice loses its credibility — due to a decades-long parade of wrongful convictions and a litany of politically-motivated prosecutions — all that is left is a power struggle between various players. And no player is more powerful than the government.

Canadians are inclined to see the excesses of the American justice system and think we are better off. That’s likely true, but cold comfort. It may be because we just know less about how our system works.

This is not about the past. Just this week Public Safety Minister Marco Mendicino told a House of Commons committee that the RCMP employs spyware — collecting data from devices, turning on mobile phone microphones or cameras — but it is used sparingly and with judicial approval.

Why would anyone believe him? The minister was spectacularly wrong when he claimed that the police had asked for the Emergencies Act to be invoked, suspending basic civil liberties and invading personal privacy. He was either Mendacious Marco or Misunderstood Mendicino, but in either case he was not telling the truth.

If the RCMP was truly desirous of protecting Canadian liberties, it may have run its spyware by the privacy commissioner first, not leaving him to read about the program in the papers.

“It would be preferable, far preferable, that privacy impact assessment be done at the front end, that my office be consulted and that this can be conveyed somehow to Canadians so that they are reassured,” Privacy Commissioner Philippe Dufresne told MPs.

We have recently watched the spectacle of the RCMP commissioner, Brenda Lucki, insisting that she “did not interfere in the ongoing investigations into the largest mass shooting in Canadian history.” Her own subordinates claim she did just that to advance the political agenda of the Liberal government.

It’s possible that Merrick Garland is not telling the truth about the Trump raid, which he may have ordered for political purposes. It is certainly plausible that Donald Trump is not telling the truth. And we see the consequences.

Our situation is also dire. Many — including me — do not believe the denials of our public safety minister and Canada’s top cop that politics was not decisive in criminal justice matters of the most grave importance. We do not believe them because their claims are simply not believable.

And because decades of police and prosecutorial abuses have demonstrated that it is right to be suspicious.
Couldn't have said it better myself. I have become so skeptical of these "announcements" that I do not believe them at all. I consider most announcements a "government propaganda" and until I see physical evidence, I don't believe a word.
 

Serryah

Senate Member
Dec 3, 2008
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Good progress:

Dems and Republicans are asking for information on all of this fiasco.

They want to know the specifics.

Glad to see it's both sides wanting to get clarification.
 

The_Foxer

Council Member
Aug 9, 2022
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Yeah, funny how many people have convicted him based on unsworn, unexamined, uncross-examined "evidence."
Considering the number who convicted trump of 'russian collusion' with considerably less it shouldn't be TOO surprising ;)

This is the effect of tribalism. It's reasonable to say there's sufficient evidence for an investigation into biden's activities and hunters and to perhaps say there's a cloud of suspicion that is unbecoming a president and should be addressed or the like - but one camp will rush to defend and the other camp will assume guilt and all rationality goes out the window. It's no different with trump, and it won't be different with whomever follows I expect. Sometimes i think we've forgotten that we are the caretakers of democracy and that duty should be above petty home-team nonsense.
 

harrylee

Man of Memes
Mar 22, 2019
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Oh, you think a Congressional investigation is a trial!

Damn, is there anything you DON'T think is a trial?
Once again, you ASS-U-ME....I said no such thing. What I am saying it is just a dog and pony show to convict Trump in the court of public opinion. That is their way of drumming up more hatred...it's the liberal way.
 

Tecumsehsbones

Hall of Fame Member
Mar 18, 2013
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Once again, you ASS-U-ME....I said no such thing. What I am saying it is just a dog and pony show to convict Trump in the court of public opinion. That is their way of drumming up more hatred...it's the liberal way.
There is no "court of public opinion." Nobody ever went to jail based on "public opinion."

But don't let that stop you from whining about how hard-done-by your Dear Leader is. It's a disgrace to Canada!
 

Twin_Moose

Hall of Fame Member
Apr 17, 2017
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Interesting LINK

Three passports, Privileged documents. A file on a presidential pardon. As evidence surfaces about what FBI agents seized during the raid of former President Donald Trump's estate in Mar-O-Lago, new questions about the real focus of the investigation and new avenues for legal challenges are bubbling to the surface.

The Justice Department informed Trump's team Monday that agents gathered the former president's passports and are obligated to return them, and that officials are also reviewing seized materials that may be covered by various privileges, multiple sources told Just the News.

DOJ has designated a process for separating materials that could be covered by executive privilege or attorney client privilege and hopes to return such memos to Trump within a couple of weeks, the sources said.

"Occasionally a warrant collection can grab things outside the scope authorized by the court and the department is now following a procedure we would for any person affected this way," one official said Monday night.
 
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