Trudeau’s nitrogen policy will decimate Canadian farming

Tecumsehsbones

Hall of Fame Member
Mar 18, 2013
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Them too....Good thing I have no bad habits, eh?.....lol
"Everything in moderation" necessarily includes moderation in moderation. If ya don't get a good high or piss-up once in a while, you're just a moderation junkie.

Just try to arrange a backstop or two when you decide it's your time to howl.
 
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Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
17,532
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Regina, Saskatchewan
At present, according to the latest census, just two per cent of Canadians are “farm (or ranch) operators.”

The numbers are a bit higher on the Prairies: 10 per cent in Saskatchewan, four per cent each in Alberta and Manitoba, but long gone are the days when a third of us lived on farms. Gone, even, are the days when we or our parents grew up in rural Canada, then moved to the city.

Most Canadians don’t even have cousins who farm.

All of which goes a long way to explaining how our prime minister, a trust-fund baby who grew up in the sheltered neighbourhood of Mount Royal, could simply decree a 30 per cent reduction in the use of fertilizers to produce food.

This is akin to the disconnect Trudeau demonstrated last winter when he similarly decreed that all cross-border truckers, who for the first 20 months of the pandemic had been Canadians’ lifeline to vast quantities of imported produce and other food stuffs, suddenly had to be vaccinated if they wanted to continue running food across the line, something they had done for nearly two years without vaccines and without incident.

Justin Trudeau demonstrates a total lack of practical understanding of how our food is produced, where it comes from and how it gets into the Provigo down the block. He acts as if it is magically produced in the back of the store and just appears as needed on the shelves.

Another sign of Trudeau’s disconnect from the real world (and an indication that nothing matters to him as much as the cult of climate alarmism) is that he has proclaimed his new fertilizer-reduction regulation in the middle of the worst food inflation Canadian consumers have faced in 40 years.

The rest at the below Link:
 
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Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
17,532
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Regina, Saskatchewan
I’m not sure whether or not to post this here or in the Omnibus Ukraine Thread?


Not since the aftermath of 9/11 has energy security been top of mind in so many countries, which, as the world’s fourth-largest producer of natural gas, offers a historic opportunity for Canada. But in order to capitalize on the current crisis and work toward a scenario in which dictators like Russian President Vladimir Putin will no longer be able to blackmail western countries by threatening to cut off energy supplies, Canada will need to fast-track the development of natural gas pipelines, LNG export terminals and other infrastructure. And in order for that to happen, the Liberals will need to settle the tension within their party between pragmatism and environmental idealism.
1659655724133.jpeg
It’s not like the Liberals don’t know that Canada has a geopolitical and economic interest in providing for the energy security of our allies. Speaking alongside Germany’s foreign minister in Montreal on Wednesday, Foreign Affairs Minister Mélanie Joly said the Germans were interested in investing in Canadian liquefied natural gas (LNG) and that she has already had meetings with officials from three provinces to discuss potential projects.
1659655755278.jpeg
At the same time, Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland told reporters in Saint John, N.B., that Canada has a “responsibility” to move ahead with new LNG projects. “I do think that energy security today, more than ever, is a question of security — full-stop. And Canada’s really lucky: we have a lot of energy. I think it is a political responsibility for us as a country to support our allies with energy security,” she said. “I think there is a role for the federal government, working with provincial governments, working with the private sector, working with our European allies to make this happen.”
1659655791309.jpeg
No kidding. Yet this is the same woman who dismissed concerns about high gas prices, saying that, “From my perspective, this price increase in fuel costs is a reminder of why climate action is so important.”
1659655832361.jpeg
And therein lies the tension at the heart of the Liberal party: on the one hand, we have a government carving out exemptions from its own economic sanctions levelled against Russia in order to return a turbine that Putin claimed was necessary to restore the Nord Stream pipeline to full capacity; and on the other, we have a party that’s unwilling to offer Canadians a break at the pumps by lowering gas taxes, is trying to reduce fertilizer usage at a time of global food shortages and is targeting the oil and gas sector with industry-specific emissions reductions in the midst of a looming European energy crisis.
1659655870288.jpeg
Nevertheless, Freeland and Joly’s comments this week show that maybe, just maybe, there are some within the party who are starting to get that meeting our climate commitments cannot always come at the expense of heating our homes and putting food on our tables — or global peace and security, for that matter. But barring an expedited project on a scale that could only be pulled off by China, which built a 1,000-bed field hospital in 10 days at the start of the pandemic (score one for Justin Trudeau’s “basic dictatorship”), it’s unlikely that Canada will be able to build any LNG export terminals or new gas pipelines until long after the war in Ukraine has come to an end.
1659655900867.jpeg
Many industry insiders are already skeptical that Germany, which currently doesn’t have any LNG terminals, will be able to meet its goal of building two of them within the next two years. A full LNG export terminal capable of liquefaction, processing and storage would take at least five years to build. And you can bet it would take much longer in a country like Canada, whose government can’t even manage to issue passports in a timely manner and made an overly bureaucratic infrastructure approvals process a centrepiece of its environmental agenda.
1659655950752.jpeg
I was involved with a small Alberta energy company in the early 2000s, whose management went on to try to build an LNG facility on the West Coast, but was stymied by excessive bureaucracy and a lack of political will. It’s hard to imagine that anyone would be willing to start such a project after a decade of failed pipeline proposals and the imposition of Bill C-69, unless they had really deep pockets and decades of time on their hands. Canada could, however, turn itself into an LNG powerhouse without wasting huge sums of public money or nationalizing anymore pipelines. All it would need to do is tell the world that the country is “open for business,” to borrow a phrase.
1659655982073.jpeg
That would mean signalling to the provinces that the federal government will no longer tolerate them standing in the way of pipelines and other energy-development projects that are in the national interest. It would entail going to companies and convincing them to build new gas pipelines. It would involve repealing Bill C-69 and removing policies that inhibit natural gas production. And it would entail reaching out to the Germans and private-sector investors elsewhere in the world to convince them to invest in Canadian energy.
1659656019536.jpeg
The federal government, in other words, would need to get the ball rolling by showing that it will no longer stand in the way of Canadian energy projects. Unfortunately, despite strong comments by Freeland and Joly this week over the role Canada should play in Europe’s energy security, the actions taken by the Trudeau Liberals recently show that it’s business as usual around the cabinet table.
1659656064791.jpeg
 
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petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
101,212
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Moccasin Flats
I’m not sure whether or not to post this here or in the Omnibus Ukraine Thread?


Not since the aftermath of 9/11 has energy security been top of mind in so many countries, which, as the world’s fourth-largest producer of natural gas, offers a historic opportunity for Canada. But in order to capitalize on the current crisis and work toward a scenario in which dictators like Russian President Vladimir Putin will no longer be able to blackmail western countries by threatening to cut off energy supplies, Canada will need to fast-track the development of natural gas pipelines, LNG export terminals and other infrastructure. And in order for that to happen, the Liberals will need to settle the tension within their party between pragmatism and environmental idealism.
View attachment 15063
It’s not like the Liberals don’t know that Canada has a geopolitical and economic interest in providing for the energy security of our allies. Speaking alongside Germany’s foreign minister in Montreal on Wednesday, Foreign Affairs Minister Mélanie Joly said the Germans were interested in investing in Canadian liquefied natural gas (LNG) and that she has already had meetings with officials from three provinces to discuss potential projects.
View attachment 15064
At the same time, Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland told reporters in Saint John, N.B., that Canada has a “responsibility” to move ahead with new LNG projects. “I do think that energy security today, more than ever, is a question of security — full-stop. And Canada’s really lucky: we have a lot of energy. I think it is a political responsibility for us as a country to support our allies with energy security,” she said. “I think there is a role for the federal government, working with provincial governments, working with the private sector, working with our European allies to make this happen.”
View attachment 15065
No kidding. Yet this is the same woman who dismissed concerns about high gas prices, saying that, “From my perspective, this price increase in fuel costs is a reminder of why climate action is so important.”
View attachment 15066
And therein lies the tension at the heart of the Liberal party: on the one hand, we have a government carving out exemptions from its own economic sanctions levelled against Russia in order to return a turbine that Putin claimed was necessary to restore the Nord Stream pipeline to full capacity; and on the other, we have a party that’s unwilling to offer Canadians a break at the pumps by lowering gas taxes, is trying to reduce fertilizer usage at a time of global food shortages and is targeting the oil and gas sector with industry-specific emissions reductions in the midst of a looming European energy crisis.
View attachment 15067
Nevertheless, Freeland and Joly’s comments this week show that maybe, just maybe, there are some within the party who are starting to get that meeting our climate commitments cannot always come at the expense of heating our homes and putting food on our tables — or global peace and security, for that matter. But barring an expedited project on a scale that could only be pulled off by China, which built a 1,000-bed field hospital in 10 days at the start of the pandemic (score one for Justin Trudeau’s “basic dictatorship”), it’s unlikely that Canada will be able to build any LNG export terminals or new gas pipelines until long after the war in Ukraine has come to an end.
View attachment 15068
Many industry insiders are already skeptical that Germany, which currently doesn’t have any LNG terminals, will be able to meet its goal of building two of them within the next two years. A full LNG export terminal capable of liquefaction, processing and storage would take at least five years to build. And you can bet it would take much longer in a country like Canada, whose government can’t even manage to issue passports in a timely manner and made an overly bureaucratic infrastructure approvals process a centrepiece of its environmental agenda.
View attachment 15069
I was involved with a small Alberta energy company in the early 2000s, whose management went on to try to build an LNG facility on the West Coast, but was stymied by excessive bureaucracy and a lack of political will. It’s hard to imagine that anyone would be willing to start such a project after a decade of failed pipeline proposals and the imposition of Bill C-69, unless they had really deep pockets and decades of time on their hands. Canada could, however, turn itself into an LNG powerhouse without wasting huge sums of public money or nationalizing anymore pipelines. All it would need to do is tell the world that the country is “open for business,” to borrow a phrase.
View attachment 15070
That would mean signalling to the provinces that the federal government will no longer tolerate them standing in the way of pipelines and other energy-development projects that are in the national interest. It would entail going to companies and convincing them to build new gas pipelines. It would involve repealing Bill C-69 and removing policies that inhibit natural gas production. And it would entail reaching out to the Germans and private-sector investors elsewhere in the world to convince them to invest in Canadian energy.
View attachment 15071
The federal government, in other words, would need to get the ball rolling by showing that it will no longer stand in the way of Canadian energy projects. Unfortunately, despite strong comments by Freeland and Joly this week over the role Canada should play in Europe’s energy security, the actions taken by the Trudeau Liberals recently show that it’s business as usual around the cabinet table.
View attachment 15072
Trudeau is still using RCP 8.5. The IPCC itself has declared RCP 8.5 IMPLAUSIBLE. the "crisis" isnt reality and never existed or will exist.

Why werent the Librigarchs notified?