Trudeau announces Amira Elghawaby as Canada's first representative to combat Islamophobia

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
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Regina, Saskatchewan
Guess who, in their official capacity as Trudeau’s anti-denti…I mean anti-Islamophobia czar…is throwing shade at the Jews for being Jews, etc….???
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…& to add balance to the universe:
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On Saturday, the Israel Defence Forces, along with other branches of Israel’s security establishment, carried out Operation Arnon — a hostage rescue mission described by many as one of the most daring and complicated in military history. Disguised as displaced Palestinians, covert Israeli special forces made their way through dauntingly complex urban terrain controlled by Hamas and successfully rescued four Israeli hostages from two separate civilian homes.

For Israelis, the Jewish diaspora and their allies, this hostage rescue was not only a desperately needed morale boost, it was a powerful reminder of just how far Israel will go to protect and save its own. Others, including Canada’s special representative on combating Islamophobia, described the operation as a “massacre.” This desperate mischaracterization of a country saving its own people from a genocidal terrorist group is terribly misleading.
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For starters, data on civilian casualties is being reported by the very group responsible for the kidnappings — Hamas. While civilians were certainly and unfortunately killed in the operation, it is impossible to say how many of the reported 274 Palestinian civilian casualties were in fact innocent bystanders.

"With the battle having ended twelve seconds ago, we can now confirm that exactly 274 Palestinian civilian dead," said Gaza Health Ministry spokesman Ismail al-Thawabta. "They were all of course civilians, we've never seen such carnage, the hospital is overwhelmed, et cetera, you guys know the drill."

In what was viewed as a potential breakthrough in addressing tensions in the war-torn region, Palestinian researchers discovered a startling correlation between holding hostages in your home and people shooting you.

The new study's findings came on the heels of a rescue operation conducted by the Israeli military to free hostages being held in Palestinian territory, with results pointing to a clear link between agreeing to imprison hostages in your home and subsequently having soldiers firing live rounds on you in an attempt to free said hostages.

"There is a distinct connection here," said lead Palestinian hostage-holding researcher Amah Salibi. "All of the data we collected showed that keeping hostages in your home leads to an exponential increase in the risk of having people shooting at you at some point in the very near future. The evidence is staggering, really."

When asked if this statistical correlation would cause Palestinians to shift their strategy away from holding hostages in their homes, Salibi was non-committal. "No, I don't think so," he said. "We will likely continue helping Hamas keep their hostages by holding them in our homes, thereby creating situations where our homes will be shot at and raided. This makes no difference whatsoever."

An Israeli Defense Force spokesman confirmed the study's findings. "Yes," said David Ben-Avraham. "If we find out hostages are being held in a Palestinian home and the occupants of the home refuse to turn over the hostages, we will shoot. This is true."

At publishing time, the same Palestinian research team had also discovered a link between firing rockets at Israel and having artillery fired back.
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Indeed, it is now known that a Palestinian journalist and his physician father were among two of the people holding the four Israelis hostage in their homes — a revelation indicative of the complexities the IDF has been facing since October 7. We also know — based on troves of intelligence, combat footage and hostage statements — that Hamas almost always operates in civilian clothing and in extremely densely populated civilian areas, further undermining the reliability of civilian death-toll figures, but Shhhhh…!!!

As this war drags on, with well over 100 civilians still held hostage in Gaza, the IDF and the Israeli government will have to grapple with more impossibly tough decisions. If opportunities arise to rescue other hostages in densely populated civilian areas, will the risk and potential fallout be worth the reward? For senior decision-makers, Israeli commandos, the country’s civilian population and for many around the world, the answer is most certainly “yes.”

Instead of vilifying Israel and the IDF for this remarkable hostage rescue, people should wake up to the fact that desperate times call for desperate measures, that the fog of war is real and that any blame for civilian casualties in Gaza should be placed squarely on Hamas.
 
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Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
23,901
8,450
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
In a written statement released on Sunday, one day after a minor reportedly set himself on fire inside Winnipeg Grand Mosque, the board of the Manitoba Islamic Association wrote, “Though we cannot speak to the details of what occurred for this youth, what we can say is that (we) remai(n) increasingly concerned about… factors that may have impacted his well-being,” as well as mental health in the broader Muslim community.

The statement continued: “We understand that global issues including the genocide against Palestinians and Muslims in Gaza and the rest of Palestine, is impacting so many people beyond the boundaries of our community.”

The group also insinuated that discrimination played a part in driving the youth to despair, writing “We cannot have mental health in the context of a racist, Islamophobic and genocidal world.” It encouraged politicians to “speak up against barriers to mental health care” for Muslim Canadians who’ve been traumatized by the scenes from Gaza.

And while the Manitoba Islamic Association released a “correction” on Monday night apologizing for wording in the statement that “may (have) contribute(d) to misconceptions and misunderstandings,” the group’s immediate reaction to the suicide is still a worrying example of the “blame the Jews” reflex that has reasserted itself in some circles since Oct. 7.
Authorities had not, as of Tuesday morning, said whether they had found a suicide note at the scene or come across any material, such as social media posts, providing any insight into what motivated the young man to set himself on fire.

However, the board of the Manitoba Islamic Association wrote in Monday’s corrective note that he “suffered from severe mental illness” and subsequently “experienced a mental health crisis which caused him to lose touch with reality,” suggesting that his challenges were known within the community. Sad…

PS. That weird thumbs down thing in the first paragraph… looked like this in the news article and I didn’t recognize it for what it was…
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