Public Inquiries into Emergencies Act begin September 19

Dixie Cup

House Member
Sep 16, 2006
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Jody Thomas, national security advisor to the P.M., did think there was a threat. Based on social media posts, she felt the convoy was a “threat to national interest and institutions by people who do not care about or understand democracy, who are preparing to be violent, who are motivated by anti-government sentiment.”

As if “anti-government sentiment” has suddenly become a crime.

In truth, it was the Trudeau government that cared little for democracy and seemed not to understand it.

More documents this week show Finance Minister and Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland wanted every one of the hundreds of Canadians who had had their bank accounts and assets frozen for supporting the convoy to report to police before having their money and property released.

Under what authority? This is nothing more than “we’re watching you” intimidation, pure and simple.
Almost none of these people was ever charged with a crime. They had never had a chance to appear before a judge, yet somehow the Deputy P.M. thought they should go cap-in-hand to police and pledge to be good little boys and girls.

This week the commission also heard from assistant deputy Finance Minister Isabelle Jacques, who said it was never the department’s intention when freezing bank accounts to harm the families of account holders.

Really!? Mortgage, rent, loan and child support payments could not be made because the government froze hundreds of joint accounts, yet senior civil servants claim they couldn’t have predicted that would hurt spouses and children.
When asked whether the freezes would impact credit ratings, Jacques scoffed that “You’re talking about people involved in unlawful activities.”

But we’re not. Donating money to the convoy (the reason most accounts were frozen) was not illegal. Besides, to punish protestors and donors arbitrarily, without a trial and a chance to defend themselves, is undemocratic.

“CSIS told government Freedom Convoy didn’t pose national security threat day before Emergencies Act invoked.”

That was a headline in the National Post this week describing documents tabled at the public inquiry into the Trudeau government’s suspension of civil rights last winter to deal with the truckers’ protest in downtown Ottawa.

The national spy agency also told the Trudeau government it could find no evidence of foreign influence behind the convoy, nor traces of foreign funding. Nor did the protests ever satisfy the definition of “national security threat” laid out in the CSIS Act.

So, that’s it, right? The Rouleau inquiry can wrap up now. Its work is done….or maybe not. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is scheduled to testify (or at least speak) at the Inquiry this coming week, & he’s ensured he’s been in the spotlight globally leading up to this…
And the lies continue....
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
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Regina, Saskatchewan
Anyway, The final week of hearings at the Public Order Emergency Commission is set to be a blockbuster one, as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, a trio of his top staffers, and several members of cabinet are set to take the stand.

This last week will be extremely interesting, or a complete clown show, or both.

Expected to testify on Monday will be top officials from the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) and the Integrated Terrorism Assessment Centre.

Then, according to the commission, here is the order of anticipated witnesses for the rest of the week:
  • Emergency Preparedness Minister Bill Blair
  • Public Safety Minister Marco Mendicino
  • Intergovernmental Affairs Minister Dominic LeBlanc
  • Justice Minister David Lametti
  • Defence Minister Anita Anand
  • Transport Minister Omar Alghabra
  • Deputy Prime Minister and Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland
  • Katie Telford, Brian Clow and John Brodhead
  • Prime Minister Justin Trudeau
This aged like old gym sneakers containing parmesan cheese:
 

taxme

Time Out
Feb 11, 2020
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Jody Thomas, national security advisor to the P.M., did think there was a threat. Based on social media posts, she felt the convoy was a “threat to national interest and institutions by people who do not care about or understand democracy, who are preparing to be violent, who are motivated by anti-government sentiment.”

As if “anti-government sentiment” has suddenly become a crime.

In truth, it was the Trudeau government that cared little for democracy and seemed not to understand it.

More documents this week show Finance Minister and Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland wanted every one of the hundreds of Canadians who had had their bank accounts and assets frozen for supporting the convoy to report to police before having their money and property released.

Under what authority? This is nothing more than “we’re watching you” intimidation, pure and simple.
Almost none of these people was ever charged with a crime. They had never had a chance to appear before a judge, yet somehow the Deputy P.M. thought they should go cap-in-hand to police and pledge to be good little boys and girls.

This week the commission also heard from assistant deputy Finance Minister Isabelle Jacques, who said it was never the department’s intention when freezing bank accounts to harm the families of account holders.

Really!? Mortgage, rent, loan and child support payments could not be made because the government froze hundreds of joint accounts, yet senior civil servants claim they couldn’t have predicted that would hurt spouses and children.
When asked whether the freezes would impact credit ratings, Jacques scoffed that “You’re talking about people involved in unlawful activities.”

But we’re not. Donating money to the convoy (the reason most accounts were frozen) was not illegal. Besides, to punish protestors and donors arbitrarily, without a trial and a chance to defend themselves, is undemocratic.

“CSIS told government Freedom Convoy didn’t pose national security threat day before Emergencies Act invoked.”

That was a headline in the National Post this week describing documents tabled at the public inquiry into the Trudeau government’s suspension of civil rights last winter to deal with the truckers’ protest in downtown Ottawa.

The national spy agency also told the Trudeau government it could find no evidence of foreign influence behind the convoy, nor traces of foreign funding. Nor did the protests ever satisfy the definition of “national security threat” laid out in the CSIS Act.

So, that’s it, right? The Rouleau inquiry can wrap up now. Its work is done….or maybe not. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is scheduled to testify (or at least speak) at the Inquiry this coming week, & he’s ensured he’s been in the spotlight globally leading up to this…

By the very act of freezing many of those trucker's bank accounts surely does make it appear as though we are now living in a communist controlled country. What the WEF fascist globalist dictator in Ottawa and his WEF globalist sidekick freeloader did to those freedom loving truckers is what we would no doubt see being done in some communist country like China or North Korea. Apparently, we do not live in a free country anymore. Welcome to fascist Canada. (n)
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
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Regina, Saskatchewan
The head of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) says he supported invoking the Emergencies Act to address anti-COVID-19 vaccine mandate protests last winter because the regular tools were "just not enough to address the situation." (???)

The above does not state that the legal requirements were met for the emergencies act to be dug out and utilized against Canadians.
 

Dixie Cup

House Member
Sep 16, 2006
4,681
2,722
113
Edmonton
Anyway, The final week of hearings at the Public Order Emergency Commission is set to be a blockbuster one, as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, a trio of his top staffers, and several members of cabinet are set to take the stand.

This last week will be extremely interesting, or a complete clown show, or both.

Expected to testify on Monday will be top officials from the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) and the Integrated Terrorism Assessment Centre.

Then, according to the commission, here is the order of anticipated witnesses for the rest of the week:
  • Emergency Preparedness Minister Bill Blair
  • Public Safety Minister Marco Mendicino
  • Intergovernmental Affairs Minister Dominic LeBlanc
  • Justice Minister David Lametti
  • Defence Minister Anita Anand
  • Transport Minister Omar Alghabra
  • Deputy Prime Minister and Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland
  • Katie Telford, Brian Clow and John Brodhead
  • Prime Minister Justin Trudeau
This aged like old gym sneakers containing parmesan cheese:
The lies continue. He obviously not watching the commission which the cops have said the act wasn't necessary.
 
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Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
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The lies continue. He obviously not watching the commission which the cops have said the act wasn't necessary.
He’s ignoring it. He’s Use to repeating his own narrative until CBC (& others) report that as news instead of the news.

Granted the video I posted predates the Emergencies Act Inquiry so reality about truth hadn’t seen the light of day yet so the lies where still working. I’m assuming the same from Trudeau in this inquiry though as he’s one to repeat the same thing over and over and over and over until it’s quoted in the media and people believe it….
 
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Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
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The director of Canada’s spy agency advised Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to invoke the Emergencies Act to end last winter’s convoy protests, despite the fact that the blockades did not meet the definition of a national security threat outlined in the sweeping legislation.
The above does not state that the legal requirements were met for the emergencies act to be dug out and utilized against Canadians.
Huh…so laws for thee but not for WE (? Sorry, wrong scandal)…I mean laws for peasants & peons but not for Elites? Is that better?
The commission heard previously that Vigneault didn't believe the self-styled Freedom Convoy constituted a threat to national security under the CSIS Act.

Whats the truth?
Maybe the truth is that Vigneault did believe the convoy didn’t constitute a threat to national security, & he advised Trudeau to invoke it anyway.

The Emergencies Act can be invoked in response to security threats that rise to the level of a national emergency that the government is unable to effectively deal with under other laws. The definition of threats to the security of Canada in the Emergencies Act is the same as the one contained in the CSIS Act, which is the legislative framework that governs the spy agency.

….The Same As….The Legislative Framework That Governs The Spy Agency. Think about that one….

Mr. Vigneault said the protests did not meet the definition of “threats to the security of Canada” contained in the CSIS Act….However, he said he received a “legal interpretation” from the federal justice department that while the Emergencies Act references the CSIS Act definition of “threats to the security of Canada” the term has a broader meaning under the Emergencies Act than the CSIS Act….

So, it’s the same as (?) or it’s not the same as?

He (Vigneault) also said that his advice to invoke that Emergencies Act was provided “as a national security adviser, as opposed to the director of CSIS.” However, he did not explain how that was possible or the distinction between the two. (???)


Mr. Vigneault did not describe the legal advice that explained that position and it is unclear whether it will be publicly released. Many of the documents released so far by the government are heavily redacted, citing solicitor-client privilege.

There are two active court challenges to the government’s use of the act. Under cross examination and in statements to the press, Cara Zwibel, a lawyer representing the Canadian Civil Liberties Association, said the “government’s argument appears to be that the Emergencies Act doesn’t mean what it says.” (?Sounds about Left?)

Mr. Vigneault’s comment that he advised the Prime Minister to invoke the Emergencies Act was OMITTED from a previous interview he did with inquiry lawyers in August. The summary released from THAT interview said Mr. Vigneault “felt an obligation to clearly convey” that the position from CSIS was that “there did NOT exist a threat to the security of Canada” as defined by the CSIS Act. Go figure? Dude is the head of a spy agency after all.

Ms. Zwibel asked Mr. Vigneault why he didn’t disclose his full advice to cabinet during his first interview with the inquiry. The CSIS director replied that he withheld his advice to invoke the Emergencies Act because he was not sure how much he could disclose from his discussions with cabinet??
So…did he purger himself in his first interview or his second (?) or does it matter (?) as long as he’s backstopping the right Left team?
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
18,542
4,268
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
It became “virtually impossible” to enforce the law in downtown Ottawa during the “Freedom Convoy” protests, Public Safety Minister Marco Mendicino says….


Mendicino is the first of two federal ministers set to testify before the inquiry Tuesday morning. He’s expected to face questions about his suggestion earlier this year that police requested the Emergencies Act, when they later asserted they did not.

He may also be asked about an email RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki sent to his office the day before the government invoked the Emergencies Act, which suggested police might not need the act’s extraordinary powers.

Intergovernmental Affairs Minister Dominic LeBlanc, whose file governs federal relationships with the provinces, is expected to testify later in the day and may be prompted to respond to Prairie provinces’ concerns they weren’t adequately consulted on federal plans.

CSIS Director David Vigneault is the latest senior bureaucrat who seems to believe that it does not matter what the Emergencies Act actually says. What’s written in legislation can be safely ignored if doing so helps the government of the day expand its powers. The act of proposing, amending and passing laws through Parliament is just so tedious.
Testifying at the Public Order Emergency Commission on Monday, Vigneault agreed that the Freedom Convoy protests did not “constitute a threat to the security of Canada,” as defined in law. Yet, he recommended using the Emergencies Act anyway.
 

pgs

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Nov 29, 2008
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It became “virtually impossible” to enforce the law in downtown Ottawa during the “Freedom Convoy” protests, Public Safety Minister Marco Mendicino says….


Mendicino is the first of two federal ministers set to testify before the inquiry Tuesday morning. He’s expected to face questions about his suggestion earlier this year that police requested the Emergencies Act, when they later asserted they did not.

He may also be asked about an email RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki sent to his office the day before the government invoked the Emergencies Act, which suggested police might not need the act’s extraordinary powers.

Intergovernmental Affairs Minister Dominic LeBlanc, whose file governs federal relationships with the provinces, is expected to testify later in the day and may be prompted to respond to Prairie provinces’ concerns they weren’t adequately consulted on federal plans.

CSIS Director David Vigneault is the latest senior bureaucrat who seems to believe that it does not matter what the Emergencies Act actually says. What’s written in legislation can be safely ignored if doing so helps the government of the day expand its powers. The act of proposing, amending and passing laws through Parliament is just so tedious.
Testifying at the Public Order Emergency Commission on Monday, Vigneault agreed that the Freedom Convoy protests did not “constitute a threat to the security of Canada,” as defined in law. Yet, he recommended using the Emergencies Act anyway.
Laws , what laws ?