Our cooling world

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
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I'm not breaking the record lows and record precipitation that won't rot until spring but I'll certainly have a sane discussion on observed climate data and trends.

$6 cauliflower coming soon to a store near you.

 

Danbones

Hall of Fame Member
Sep 23, 2015
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Yeah beautiful is record early snows...and crop failures, and I bet you can't wait for the tyrannical gun free starvation like they had in china in "the great leap into the future grave" early in the 60s.

Record September snowstorm drops 4 feet of snow on Montana ...
https://www.google.com/url?client=i...FjAGegQIDxAC&usg=AOvVaw0pFzaBvkX3Vt6sAZBDOHkk

Grand Solar Minimum Intensifies - Record Crop Loss Worldwide


Climate Feedback "EXPOSED"
Friends of Science

Some 500 scientists from around the world issued a declaration to the UN on Sept 23, 2019, that there is NO CLIMATE EMERGENCY. However, global media remain silent - perhaps waiting to hear from "ClimateFeedback" - a self-appointed group of scientists who obviously defend the climate catastrophe mantra.

"ClimateFeedback" is 'certified' by POYNTER Institute as being accurate - but this means we have now descended into the netherworld foretold by Prof. Christopher Essex in his clever essay "Cavemen, Climate and Computer Science" Cavemen, Climate, and Computers - https://blog.friendsofscience.org/201...

where journalists (who are NOT scientists) are deciding who IS a credible 'climate' scientist....when most journos can't even name the complex differential equations that are fundamental to climate science - let alone describe the variables involved.

..and there is Yorgie programmed for tyrannical destruction of humanity for the ruling elite who want the whole sh*thole planet for themselves and who is set on "repeat".
 
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petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
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Everybody blathers on about Eisenhower and the military Industrial complex but this part goes unheeded.

Akin to, and largely responsible for the sweeping changes in our industrial-military posture, has been the technological revolution during recent decades.

In this revolution, research has become central, it also becomes more formalized, complex, and costly. A steadily increasing share is conducted for, by, or at the direction of, the Federal government.
...
The prospect of domination of the nation's scholars by Federal employment, project allocation, and the power of money is ever present and is gravely to be regarded.

Yet in holding scientific discovery in respect, as we should, we must also be alert to the equal and opposite danger that public policy could itself become the captive of a scientific-technological elite.
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
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The real crisis MSM wont tell you about.

As we head into Solar Cycle 21 NASA says it will be the deepest Solar Minimum in 200 years.

What happened last time?

Let's let's NASA explain:



Many things can change temperatures on Earth: a volcano erupts, swathing the Earth with bright haze that blocks sunlight, and temperatures drop; greenhouse gases trap heat in the atmosphere, and temperatures climb. From 1650 to 1710, temperatures across much of the Northern Hemisphere plunged when the Sun entered a quiet phase now called the Maunder Minimum. During this period, very few sunspots appeared on the surface of the Sun, and the overall brightness of the Sun decreased slightly. Already in the midst of a colder-than-average period called the Little Ice Age, Europe and North America went into a deep freeze: alpine glaciers extended over valley farmland; sea ice crept south from the Arctic; and the famous canals in the Netherlands froze regularly—an event that is rare today.

The impact of the solar minimum is clear in this image, which shows the temperature difference between 1680, a year at the center of the Maunder Minimum, and 1780, a year of normal solar activity, as calculated by a general circulation model. Deep blue across eastern and central North America and northern Eurasia illustrates where the drop in temperature was the greatest. Nearly all other land areas were also cooler in 1680, as indicated by the varying shades of blue. The few regions that appear to have been warmer in 1680 are Alaska and the eastern Pacific Ocean (left), the North Atlantic Ocean south of Greenland (left of center), and north of Iceland (top center).

If energy from the Sun decreased only slightly, why did temperatures drop so severely in the Northern Hemisphere? Climate scientist Drew Shindell and colleagues at the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies tackled that question by combining temperature records gleaned from tree rings, ice cores, corals, and the few measurements recorded in the historical record, with an advanced computer model of the Earth’s climate. The group first calculated the amount of energy coming from the Sun during the Maunder Minimum and entered the information into a general circulation model. The model is a mathematical representation of the way various Earth systems—ocean surface temperatures, different layers of the atmosphere, energy reflected and absorbed from land, and so forth—interact to produce the climate.

When the model started with the decreased solar energy and returned temperatures that matched the paleoclimate record, Shindell and his colleagues knew that the model was showing how the Maunder Minimum could have caused the extreme drop in temperatures. The model showed that the drop in temperature was related to ozone in the stratosphere, the layer of the atmosphere that is between 10 and 50 kilometers from the Earth’s surface. Ozone is created when high-energy ultraviolet light from the Sun interacts with oxygen. During the Maunder Minimum, the Sun emitted less strong ultraviolet light, and so less ozone formed. The decrease in ozone affected planetary waves, the giant wiggles in the jet stream that we are used to seeing on television weather reports.

The change to the planetary waves kicked the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO)—the balance between a permanent low-pressure system near Greenland and a permanent high-pressure system to its south—into a negative phase. When the NAO is negative, both pressure systems are relatively weak. Under these conditions, winter storms crossing the Atlantic generally head eastward toward Europe, which experiences a more severe winter. (When the NAO is positive, winter storms track farther north, making winters in Europe milder.) The model results, shown above, illustrate that the NAO was more negative on average during the Maunder Minimum, and Europe remained unusually cold. These results matched the paleoclimate record.

By creating a model that could reproduce temperatures recorded in paleoclimate records, Shindell and colleagues reached a better understanding of how changes in the stratosphere influence weather patterns. With such an understanding, scientists are better poised to understand what factors could influence Earth’s climate in the future. To read more about how ancient temperature records are used to improve climate models, see Paleoclimatology: Understanding the Past to Predict the Future, the final installment of a series of articles about paleoclimatology on the Earth Observatory.

Further Reading:
Glaciers, Old Masters, and Galileo: The Puzzle of the Chilly 17th Century, by Drew Shindell at NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies.
 

petros

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The few regions that appear to have been warmer in 1680 are Alaska and the eastern Pacific Ocean (left), the North Atlantic Ocean south of Greenland (left of center), and north of Iceland (top center).
The same is happening right now.
 

petros

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Denver – 2nd Largest Temperature Change On Record!

October 12, 2019

A 70 degree change in two days, and a record low for the date.!The temperature in Denver dropped from 83 F (28.3 C) on Wednesday to a record low of 13 F (-10.6 C) on Thursday evening. This difference of 70 degrees in just 2 days is tied for second largest temperature change in Denver since 1872 when records began.
 

JLM

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 27, 2008
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Damn globe was freezing this morning when I got up at 0530. It was -4. So much for climate change, huh?


Basically just in the polar regions. Climate here has been on a cooling trend since 2016, and this year we've had an inordinate amount of cold weather. Summer was nice here and mainly without the normal number of scorching days (above 34C)
 

AnnaEmber

Council Member
Aug 31, 2019
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lol Again, people shouldn't listen to politicians, others with invested interests in one or another aspects of the issue, their next door neighbour's pet parrot, etc. and it's really quite silly to base pne's opinions upon a "I wannit to be sunny so the weather is sunny (or snowy or whatever)" and I don't like what so-and-so said about it so it's BS.
And again,
Weather is the day-to-day state of the atmosphere, and its short-term variation in minutes to weeks. People generally think of weather as the combination of temperature, humidity, precipitation, cloudiness, visibility, and wind. We talk about changes in weather in terms of the near future: "How hot is it right now?" "What will it be like today?" and "Will we get a snowstorm this week?"

Climate is the weather of a place averaged over a period of time, often 30 years. Climate information includes the statistical weather information that tells us about the normal weather, as well as the range of weather extremes for a location.
- https://nsidc.org/cryosphere/arctic-meteorology/climate_vs_weather.html
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
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I shouldn't pay attention when O&G companies are lobbying in favour of Carbon Taxes as I see huge subsidies for "green energy" going to said O&G companies.

Big Oil is Big Green Energy.

Suncor to build multiple solar and wind projects in Alberta
By Daniel Rodriguez in News
March 23rd 2016
#35 of 1112 articles from the Special Report:
Race Against Climate Change

Suncor, the largest oil sands producer in Canada, is exploring the possibility of building multiple solar and wind farm projects in southern Alberta.

"Suncor is in the very preliminary development stage of three proposed solar projects in Alberta," Suncor spokesperson Nicole Fisher said on Monday, noting that the three sites included the Hand Hills project east of Drumheller, the Forty Mile project near Medicine Hat, and the Schuler project in the Cypress County area.

Fisher said Suncor submitted a system access service request to the Alberta Electric System Operator (AESO), and that the company is currently working through the connection process on these projects, which would each have a generating capacity of up to 80 megawatts.

"Renewable energy is an important part of the global energy mix as we work toward a sustainable energy future," she said.

If built, these projects would add 240 megawatts of solar generation capacity to the current 9 megawatts Alberta has. They are expected to be connected to the grid by March of 2018.

Suncor is also developing four wind farms that could generate up to 440 megawatts. If the company decides to build all these wind and solar farms in Alberta, they will add more than triple the company's renewable energy production.

Suncor has operated wind projects since 2002, and the company has six wind farms with a total capacity of 287 megawatts. Suncor has yet to operate its first solar farm. Last year, Suncor and Canadian Solar backed away from building a 24.5-megawatt solar farm in Dufferin Country, Ontario.

Strong financial standing allows Suncor to diversify
In March 2015, Suncor Energy CEO Steve Williams made a strong call for business leaders to tackle climate change.

"Climate change is happening," Williams said in a speech at an event hosted by Canada’s Ecofiscal Commission. "Doing nothing is not an option we can choose."

Later in November, Williams was one of the four oil company’s CEOs who stood alongside Premier Rachel Notley when she announced Alberta’s new climate change framework.

Suncor is evolving as an energy company, said Jamie Bonham, manager of the extractive research and engagement unit at NEI Investments, a Canadian mutual fund company that manages over $6 billion in investor assets.

“They have cash flow that renewable energies would die for it,” said Bonham explaining that this enviable financial standing and progressive corporate culture could allow Suncor to become a renewable energy leader.

The problem holding energy companies back from investing in renewable energy is the return on investment compared with oil projects. “The price of oil changes this conversations, and make these projects look more attractive,” Bonham said.

He added that Suncor is better positioned than other oil companies to succeed in this sector. Renewable energy projects have a long-term payback similar to oil sands projects in comparison with conventional oil extraction.

Mike Dunn, a research analyst with FirstEnergy Capital, noted Suncor has been investing in renewable energy for years in Ontario with the support of subsidies.

But he said Suncor is somewhat unique in the industry for investing in renewables.

“Most of their Canadian peers aren’t doing the same thing. We haven’t see them investing directly in solar or wind projects, where they are the equity owner," Dunn said. "Some of them have invested in companies that are developing renewable technologies. Most oil companies have the taken the view that (renewables) are not their area of expertise, and they haven’t tried to operate that themselves.”

NEI is looking to invest in companies with strong financial performance and rigorous environment, social and governance practice. Suncor makes five per cent of NEI’s ethical fund.

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Enbridge

Since our initial investment in a wind farm in 2002, we've committed more than $7.8 billion in capital to renewable energy and power transmission projects currently in operation or under construction.

Together, our renewable energy projects (either operating or under construction) have the capacity to generate 3,641 megawatts (MW) gross of zero-emission energy (1,748 MW net). Today, Enbridge is one of the largest renewable energy companies in Canada, and we have a diversified portfolio of renewable energy projects.

To date, we’ve invested in:

20 wind farms (3,432 MW gross capacity, either in operation or under construction);
Four solar energy operations (152 MW gross capacity);
Five waste heat recovery facilities (34 MW gross capacity);
A geothermal project (22 MW capacity);
A power transmission line (300 MW capacity); and
A hydroelectric facility (2 MW capacity).


How big oil gets your carbon taxes...

Natural Resources Canada
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HomeClimate ChangeGreen Infrastructure programsEmerging Renewable Power Program
Emerging Renewable Power Program
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The Request for Project Applications under the Emerging Renewable Power Program is now closed.

Action on Emerging Renewable Power
The Emerging Renewable Power Program (ERPP) provides up to $200 million to expand the portfolio of commercially viable renewable energy sources available to provinces and territories as they work to reduce GHG emissions from their electricity sectors.

What is the Emerging Renewable Power Program?
Emerging renewable projects face higher risks, costs and more regulatory issues than projects using established renewable energy sources.

This program mitigates the risk of emerging renewable power projects through federal government funding, allowing emerging renewables to play a larger role in Canada’s electricity supply mix.

The program will establish new industries in Canada by supporting renewable power technologies that are:

already established at the commercial level abroad but not yet in Canada
demonstrated in Canada but not yet deployed at utility scale
 
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petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
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Kenney's pledge to end wind and solar subsidies would 'roll back the clock,' says energy expert

UCP leader vows not to repeat mistakes of Ontario government

Helen Pike - CBC News

Posted: February 22, 2019
Last Updated: February 23, 2019

When you are broke and alleged climate change stops, will you pat yourself on the back for stopping something the didn't exit?
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
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Vancouver has ‘coldest Oct. 10 in 123 years’ as temperatures tumble across B.C.

October 12, 2019
From the CBC

41 records broken in province in past 2 days, with Clinton dipping below -10 C

CBC News · Posted: Oct 10, 2019 11:40 AM PT | Last Updated: October 10
 

JLM

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 27, 2008
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Vancouver has ‘coldest Oct. 10 in 123 years’ as temperatures tumble across B.C.

October 12, 2019
From the CBC

41 records broken in province in past 2 days, with Clinton dipping below -10 C

CBC News · Posted: Oct 10, 2019 11:40 AM PT | Last Updated: October 10


Clinton can be weird, often the coldest place in the province , while Ashcroft 30 miles away can be the hottest!