COVID-19 'Pandemic'

IdRatherBeSkiing

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May 28, 2007
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You mean after I've handled all the groceries that I'm buying?
They should be wearing gloves or using hand sanitizer after touching your contaminated groceries. If they don't, its on them, The plexiglass protects them from you wheezing on them since you decided your need for groceries outweighs the health of everybody else around you. But we live in an asshole society so you deal with stuff to protect people from assholes.
 

Jinentonix

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Sep 6, 2015
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They should be wearing gloves or using hand sanitizer after touching your contaminated groceries. If they don't, its on them, The plexiglass protects them from you wheezing on them since you decided your need for groceries outweighs the health of everybody else around you. But we live in an asshole society so you deal with stuff to protect people from assholes.
Yeah, because who the fuck needs to eat, right? I'm sure we could have all gone at least 6 months without eating. But you're right, we do live in an asshole society. Why, there's even assholes who get all uppity fuck about people needing to eat during a pandemic. I dunno about your neck of the woods but around these parts, food is a necessity, not a luxury.
 
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IdRatherBeSkiing

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May 28, 2007
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Yeah, because who the fuck needs to eat, right? I'm sure we could have all gone at least 6 months without eating. But you're right, we do live in an asshole society. Why, there's even assholes who get all uppity fuck about people needing to eat during a pandemic. I dunno about your neck of the woods but around these parts, food is a necessity, not a luxury.
If only someone would invent a delivery service for groceries or friends. Until then, I guess just put up some plexiglass to help the people being exposed somewhat more than if it wasn't there.
 
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spaminator

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Oct 26, 2009
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COVID, flu and RSV this winter: Why U.S. experts are worried
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Nancy Lapid
Publishing date:Oct 26, 2022 • 5 hours ago • 2 minute read • Join the conversation

U.S. doctors are warning that a surge in cases of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is coinciding with an increase in COVID transmission and an earlier-than-normal flu season, raising the specter of a “tripledemic” of respiratory illness this winter.


In particular, RSV infections among young children are reportedly filling some U.S. hospitals to capacity.


“We are already seeing patients testing positive for more than one virus,” said pediatrician Dr. Ira Wardono of Providence Cedars-Sinai Tarzana Medical Center in Tarzana, California, in a statement.

WHO IS AT RISK?
Infants are most at risk from RSV because they often cannot cough up the secretions caused by the virus and may need airway suctioning or intravenous fluids. Some may need extra oxygen. Older children and most adults typically experience mild, cold-like symptoms.

On average, RSV leads to 58,000 hospitalizations among children under age 5 and 177,000 hospitalizations among adults age 65 and older each year, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.


RSV deaths are rare in U.S. children, but 14,000 adults die annually from the virus, with older or immunocompromised individuals at greatest risk, the CDC said.

WHAT CAN PREVENT RSV?
Infection with RSV can be prevented in the same way one would ward off any virus: staying away from people who are sick, ensuring the best possible ventilation when you are indoors, wearing a high quality mask, and keeping your hands as clean as possible, said Dr. Jay Varma, Chief Medical Adviser at Kroll.com and Director of the Weill Cornell Center for Pandemic Prevention and Response.

High-risk infants can receive preventive treatment with monthly doses of Synagis (palivizumab) from Swedish drugmaker Orphan Biovitrum. AstraZeneca Plc and Sanofi SA are hoping for U.S. and European approval of Beyfortus (nirsevimab) for preventing RSV infections in newborns and infants.


There is no vaccine against RSV, although Pfizer Inc is developing RSVpreF for adults. In the meantime, it is important “for everyone to get up to date on their COVID and flu vaccines,” Varma said.

WHAT IS CAUSING THIS SURGE?
Part of the increase in RSV cases is due to the relaxation of COVID-precautions, such as masking and social distancing, which reduced rates of both RSV and flu during the pandemic, Varma said.

RSV rates were unusually low in the fall/winter of 2020-2021 but increased dramatically starting in Spring 2021 and have spiked since late August.

The CDC says it cannot yet predict when the previous seasonal patterns will return.

 

The_Foxer

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Aug 9, 2022
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The CDC says it cannot yet predict when the previous seasonal patterns will return.
Magically, despite not having a degree in medicine or gov't funding, i can predict it where they can't apparently.

It will go back to normal when a) - our lives go back to normal for about a year or so and people get a little sick and develop the same levels of natural immunity they always had as a group, and;

b)- when the gov't gets sick of having the extra powers that "pandemics".... oh, sorry, TRIPLEdemics give them over the population through fear and "emergency regulation'.

a) should take about a year. b)...... well that might take a little longer.
 
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pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
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COVID, flu and RSV this winter: Why U.S. experts are worried
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Nancy Lapid
Publishing date:Oct 26, 2022 • 5 hours ago • 2 minute read • Join the conversation

U.S. doctors are warning that a surge in cases of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is coinciding with an increase in COVID transmission and an earlier-than-normal flu season, raising the specter of a “tripledemic” of respiratory illness this winter.


In particular, RSV infections among young children are reportedly filling some U.S. hospitals to capacity.


“We are already seeing patients testing positive for more than one virus,” said pediatrician Dr. Ira Wardono of Providence Cedars-Sinai Tarzana Medical Center in Tarzana, California, in a statement.

WHO IS AT RISK?
Infants are most at risk from RSV because they often cannot cough up the secretions caused by the virus and may need airway suctioning or intravenous fluids. Some may need extra oxygen. Older children and most adults typically experience mild, cold-like symptoms.

On average, RSV leads to 58,000 hospitalizations among children under age 5 and 177,000 hospitalizations among adults age 65 and older each year, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.


RSV deaths are rare in U.S. children, but 14,000 adults die annually from the virus, with older or immunocompromised individuals at greatest risk, the CDC said.

WHAT CAN PREVENT RSV?
Infection with RSV can be prevented in the same way one would ward off any virus: staying away from people who are sick, ensuring the best possible ventilation when you are indoors, wearing a high quality mask, and keeping your hands as clean as possible, said Dr. Jay Varma, Chief Medical Adviser at Kroll.com and Director of the Weill Cornell Center for Pandemic Prevention and Response.

High-risk infants can receive preventive treatment with monthly doses of Synagis (palivizumab) from Swedish drugmaker Orphan Biovitrum. AstraZeneca Plc and Sanofi SA are hoping for U.S. and European approval of Beyfortus (nirsevimab) for preventing RSV infections in newborns and infants.


There is no vaccine against RSV, although Pfizer Inc is developing RSVpreF for adults. In the meantime, it is important “for everyone to get up to date on their COVID and flu vaccines,” Varma said.

WHAT IS CAUSING THIS SURGE?
Part of the increase in RSV cases is due to the relaxation of COVID-precautions, such as masking and social distancing, which reduced rates of both RSV and flu during the pandemic, Varma said.

RSV rates were unusually low in the fall/winter of 2020-2021 but increased dramatically starting in Spring 2021 and have spiked since late August.

The CDC says it cannot yet predict when the previous seasonal patterns will return.

The experts , again , the same experts that gave us two weeks to flatten the curve . I’ll pass thank you .
 
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spaminator

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Doug Ford, Sylvia Jones immune from testifying at Emergencies Act inquiry: Judge
The pair can resist the valid summons by invoking their parliamentary privilege

Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Publishing date:Nov 07, 2022 • 18 hours ago • 3 minute read • 39 Comments

Ontario’s premier and a top minister will not have to testify at the Emergencies Act inquiry in Ottawa due to immunity provided to them by parliamentary privilege, a Federal Court judge ruled Monday.


Justice Simon Fothergill said a summons issued to Premier Doug Ford and deputy premier Sylvia Jones by the Public Order Emergency Commission is valid, but the pair can resist it by invoking their parliamentary privilege, which is granted to sitting politicians.


“The summonses issued by the Commission to (Ford and Jones) are valid,” Fothergill wrote.

“However, so long as the Ontario Legislative Assembly remains in session, the applicants may resist the summonses by asserting parliamentary privilege and the Commission cannot take steps to enforce their attendance and compel them to give evidence.”

Ontario’s legislature has been in session since early August and remains in session regardless of adjournments. Both sides and the judge agreed on that point.


The Public Order Emergency Commission is examining the federal government’s use of the Emergencies Act to end the so-called Freedom Convoy protests last winter in Ottawa and Windsor, Ont.

Commissioner Paul Rouleau summoned Ford and Jones to testify at the inquiry because he wanted to know their role in the crisis that left downtown Ottawa occupied for weeks and traffic blocked from entering Canada at the country’s busiest border crossing. They were set to testify on Thursday.

Ford’s office declined to comment after the decision came.

At news conference earlier Monday, Ford repeated earlier comments that the inquiry is a federal matter, not a provincial one.

“This is a federal inquiry based on the federal government calling for the Emergencies Act,” he said. “This is a federal issue.”


Ford and Jones had filed an application for a judicial review and sought a stay of the summons.

They argued the summons should be quashed because they are immune to testifying due to parliamentary privilege that allows them to focus on their duties at Queen’s Park.

Parliamentary privilege is a part of the Constitution, but has its roots in the English House of Commons. It was designed to protect the House and its members from interference from the King and the House of Lords, Canada’s House of Commons website says. When applied, it provides immunity to parliamentarians from being scrutinized by courts, experts say.

Several federal ministers have waived their parliamentary privilege for the Emergencies Act inquiry, including Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Attorney General David Lametti, who are set to testify in the coming weeks.


The inquiry commissioner had argued Ford and Jones “overstated” the extent of parliamentary privilege.

“There is no blanket privilege to decline to testify; it is only a temporal privilege,” the commissioner argued in court documents.

Ford and Jones argued if the summons to the inquiry was allowed to stand, it would cause “irreparable harm” to the rule of law.

The Federal Court judge said the commissioner had jurisdiction to issue the summons for Ford and Jones, which the province argued he did not.

“The matters in respect of which the Premier and Minister have been called to testify are within the scope of the Commissioner’s mandate, and it appears that both witnesses may have valuable evidence to offer,” Fothergill wrote.


Both Ford and Jones have already invoked their parliamentary privilege, court heard last week.

The Ottawa Coalition of Residents and Businesses, which has standing at the inquiry, joined the commissioner in the judicial review case.

They argued last week their clients wanted to hear from Ford and Jones about their involvement, or lack thereof, to solve the crises in Ottawa and Windsor.

“The people of Ottawa felt abandoned during a three-week occupation in February, where their streets became zones of lawlessness,” said coalition lawyer Bijon Roy,

“The court’s decision places it squarely in the hands of Premier Ford and Minister Jones as to whether or not they will show the Commission — and the people of Ottawa — the courtesy and respect of coming to our city and explaining their role in the troubling events of February 2022.”
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
102,823
7,840
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Moccasin Flats
How is Emily feeling these days ?
Emily tries but misunderstands
She's often inclined to borrow somebody's dreams 'til tomorrow
There is no other day
Let's try it another way
You'll lose your mind and play
Free games for May
See Emily play
Soon after dark Emily cries
Gazing through trees in sorrow, hardly a sound 'til tomorrow
There is no other day
Let's try it another way
You'll lose your mind and play
Free games for May
See Emily play
Put on a gown that touches the ground
Float on a river forever and ever
Emily, Emily
There is no other day
Let's try it another way
You'll lose your mind and play
Free games for May
See Emily play

Songwriters: Syd Barrett/Pink Floyd
 
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spaminator

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Oct 26, 2009
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We may soon be asked to put on masks once again: Toronto health official
Among some students there are a range of views about bringing back masks

Author of the article:Scott Laurie
Publishing date:Nov 09, 2022 • 13 hours ago • 2 minute read • 120 Comments
A senior Toronto Public Health official has cautioned the province may soon strongly recommend a return to masking

A senior Toronto Public Health official has cautioned the province may soon strongly recommend a return to masking as COVID and flu infections put pressure on the health-care system.


“Our chief public health officer of health has said very publicly that strongly recommended masking may be coming,” said Dr. Vinita Dubey, associate medical officer of health for Toronto Public Health (TPH).


“We can see that with that strong recommendation, mask usage does increase – even without having to go to a mandate.”

A surge in respiratory illness is expected to worsen, especially among young people.

Dubey made her comments Wednesday during an Ontario Medical Association briefing, featuring a panel of doctors, who stressed the importance of flu and COVID vaccinations and masks.

“Once we recognize that we’re in this situation now – of increasing respiratory viruses – we can all take that measure to wear masks,” she added.


As the discussion about masks ramps up, Waterloo University instituted a mandate Wednesday.

“We strongly encourage you to wear a mask in all indoor spaces, though this is still optional in non-academic settings and activities,” a school statement read. “We all have a role to play to protect the most vulnerable in our society.”

Recommended video
National figures show the seasonal flu – which barely surfaced last year – is mostly affecting young people.

Dubey noted 55% of cases are among those 19 years old and younger.


Outside Monarch Park Collegiate, students expressed a range of views about masking on Wednesday.

A few students continue to wear a mask regularly.

“They’re used to it. It’s been two years of covering your faces, so now they just feel weird taking it off,” said Anam Ali.

Karl Mckinnon described, “it was like a big celebration. Everybody was so happy,” when masks became optional.

He said if students have to wear them again, “maybe at first it would be annoying. Breathing is harder, and you can’t see people faces. But after a bit you get used to it.”

Benjamin Martin added that while he prefers a mask-free existence, “I guess I would be fine with it” if health officials imposed a new mandate.

slaurie@postmedia.com
Twitter: @_ScottLaurie
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
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Elderly pair sentenced over COVID-19 racism and mischief at Richmond, B.C. cafe
Eric Bethune, 74, and Astrid Maria Secreve, 76, poured coffee on the floor and made racist statements over restrictions

Author of the article:Staff Reporter
Publishing date:Nov 09, 2022 • 1 day ago • 3 minute read • Join the conversation

Two seniors have received a criminal record after admitting they poured coffee on the floor of a Richmond café during the peak of COVID-19, then racially abused a female worker before leaving the scene.


According to a recent Provincial Court of B.C. ruling, 74-year-old Eric Bethune and 76-year-old Astrid Maria Secreve entered Rocanini Coffee Roasters on March 29, 2021 and ordered two extra-hot mochas and one lemon square. At that time a provincial health order was in place limiting the number of people who could be seated inside any restaurant or café.


The ruling states that there was no available seating space inside the coffee shop and that Bethune and Secreve were offered seats outside on the patio. Instead, Bethune picked up a table from the patio and brought it inside, unstacked two chairs and the pair sat at the table (that was close to the washroom entrance) and began drinking and eating.

The pair were approached by barista Way Chan and then store manager Yinying Tan, who asked them to sit outside. The pair refused, and when Tan offered them another inside table that had become available the pair again refused to move.


Judge Diana Vandor determined that soon after, Bethune and Secreve stood up and poured their drinks on the ground. Secreve then said to Tan, “f–k you Chinese.” Tan flicked Secreve with a towel, at which point Secreve released her cup, landing on Tan’s head.

Court heard that the pair then tried to leave the café, while Tan grabbed the back of Secreve’s sweater and yanked Bethune’s arm. Tan then started a video recording on her phone as the two left. During a verbal exchange, Bethune restated Secreve’s racist abuse, adding “The coronavirus is you”, while Tan retorted “You’re f–king racist.”

The pair then drove off, before returning to collect Secreve’s purse, by which time the police had arrived after being contacted by Tan.


During the third day of the Richmond trial Bethune and Secreve pleaded guilty to mischief. They told the court that the COVID-19 pandemic was isolating for them and hard on their health. Secreve later contracted the disease and was now mentally foggy, she said.

Bethune said that he felt sorry the incident had occurred, but felt victimized and that he had been pushed into the situation.

Vandor was not convinced.

“This was a brazen and disrespectful mischief, which disrupted a private business on private property. It disturbed the comfort of other customers,” Vandor wrote in her ruling.

“The video shows two customers getting up from their tables, gesturing at the spill, including an elderly woman who used a walker. Ms. Tan and Mr. Chan had to clean up the coffee on the ground. Mr. Chan stopped taking orders after the mischief. He observed other customers leave the café after the mischief. The café closed early, before the scheduled closing time of 4 p.m. Mr. Chan did not leave the café until 7 p.m. because he had to talk to the police and provide them with the surveillance video.


“I am satisfied beyond a reasonable doubt that Ms. Secreve’s mischief was motivated, at least in part, by her bias or prejudice or hate based on the café manager’s Chinese race or ethnic origin.”

Court also heard from Tan, who said that she had not been verbally racially abused in Canada before that day, and she feared Bethune and Secreve would take revenge on her for calling the police.

“After Ms. Secreve and Mr. Bethune left in their car, Ms. Tan testified that she returned to the café and could not hold her emotions. She began crying. She was not able to serve customers. She felt traumatized for a very long time. She felt very insecure and uncomfortable going to work. She wanted to hide and avoid friends and family. She felt fragile,” wrote Vandor, adding Tan was simply doing her job and trying to abide by provincial health orders in order for the café to remain open.

Bethune and Secreve were each handed a 12-month suspended sentence, meaning they will have a criminal record but not be detained. Vandor did not order the pair to take counselling or write an apology letter because Bethune and Secreve were not remorseful or apologetic.

“I am not persuaded that they can be rehabilitated in this way,” she wrote.


 

The_Foxer

Council Member
Aug 9, 2022
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We may soon be asked to put on masks once again
I think it's time to quit pretending that the covid restrictions are anything other than the province's attempt to make up for their failed Healthcare systems. They don't want us to wear masks because they're so worried that covid deaths are high. They want people to wear masks because we can't even take one additional person coming into the ER for COVID-19 won't anything else because the system is so broken.

They want to blame the fact that there is no room in the hospitals and no doctors in the ER on Kobe. But it's really just the province's failure to deliver medical services properly, and if they were then covid wouldn't be an issue in the slightest.