COVID-19 'Pandemic'

The_Foxer

Council Member
Aug 9, 2022
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I doubt if Pierre is referring to childhood vaccines which have been proven effective over the years.
Whether he is or he isn't tho it's the same answer. You can't "force" compliance like that, there is always a backlash and it will be a major backlash.

90 percent of parents will get their kids vaccinated. That's more than enough. Trying to squeeze that last 10 percent will drive anti-vax sentiment through the roof and suddenly you've got a massive fight where there didn't need to be one.

The liberals have got to learn that you can't just force everyone to bend to your will. "the more you tighten your grip, the more systems will slip through your finglers" as leia would say :)3.3 (edited because i misspelled leia :))
 
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Dixie Cup

House Member
Sep 16, 2006
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Whether he is or he isn't tho it's the same answer. You can't "force" compliance like that, there is always a backlash and it will be a major backlash.

90 percent of parents will get their kids vaccinated. That's more than enough. Trying to squeeze that last 10 percent will drive anti-vax sentiment through the roof and suddenly you've got a massive fight where there didn't need to be one.

The liberals have got to learn that you can't just force everyone to bend to your will. "the more you tighten your grip, the more systems will slip through your finglers" as leyah would say :)3.3
I agree.
 

pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
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The simple answer there is DON"T FORCE IT DOWN PEOPLE"S THROATS!!!

The FASTEST way to turn people away from vaccines is demand they MUST take them on pain of law. And children are NOT required to take it to go to school, there has always been an exclusion for religious OR MORAL reasons. In other words, if you don't want your kid to take it because you think it's bad and you're willing to sign to that effect then fine.

There will always be a small number of people who for whatever reason decide they don't trust the vaccines. Fine. We do NOT need 100 percent vaccination to fight off a disease or illness. Let them go, and everyone else will look at them like they're a weird fringe crackpot group. But if you demand it and then it turns into a public fight you'll see exactly what we saw with covid and FOR NO GOOD REASON. Even worse - pretty soon everyone gets sick of it and stops with the vaccines, which has happened now.

Polievre's approach is absolutely the correct one. The VAST majority will choose to get their kids vaccinated, a handful won't but they'll be happy because they had a choice, Canada will be sufficiently protected and the problem will be over.

Yeash. How hard is that.
It might even make sense if the jabs ( they are not vaccines ) worked as advertised. But with them neither preventing transmission nor providing immunity why bother ?
 

spaminator

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Oct 26, 2009
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City of Toronto pulls controversial vaccination ad campaign within hours
City spokesman Brad Ross acknowledges the ad campaign 'missed the mark'

Author of the article:Joe Warmington
Publishing date:Sep 21, 2022 • 21 hours ago • 3 minute read • 144 Comments
The City of Toronto has yanked five controversial ads aimed at encouraging parents to vaccinate their kids against COVID-19.
The City of Toronto has yanked five controversial ads aimed at encouraging parents to vaccinate their kids against COVID-19. PHOTO BY CITY OF TORONTO /YouTube
The City of Toronto has pulled a $20,000 video ad campaign encouraging families to vaccinate their kids, saying it “can do better.”


They removed the five ad spots just hours after release and following public and media backlash about the city’s use of children in these Public Service Announcements attempting to illustrate there are things in life that they can’t partake in without receiving a COVID-19 injection.


“We have pulled all of the videos for now while we undertake a review of each to determine if there are other issues we need to address,” said Toronto chief spokesperson Brad Ross. “I’m also undertaking a complete review of the approvals process for such videos.”

Each video cost the taxpayers $4,000 to produce.

“The campaign was developed by the ‘vaccine engagement team’ — a group of community ambassadors who have done a fabulous job of educating and reaching out to communities that are hard to reach, whether because of language barriers, cultural barriers or general hesitancy about vaccines,” said Ross.


“Toronto has one of the highest vaccination rates in the world, thanks in part to their efforts,” he said. “This is very much community-led, but there is ultimate approval required by the city, and it is here where I am working to understand how and why we missed the mark on this.”



The controversy began with an advertisement of a girl looking out the window and hearing her peers playing outside.

“Mom, can I go outside and play with my friends?” she asks.

“No honey, there’s still something going around,” her mom responds.

Then came the tagline stating, “Kids should be out there, not in here,” and that in Toronto “COVID-19 Vaccines available for children six months to 12 years.”

Needless to say, social media lit up.

“Disgusting propaganda and harmful to our children,” tweeted Monica Marchand.



Klo tweeted, “Many countries have banned vaccines for kids under 12. That ad suggests they will be segregated if they aren’t vaccinated.”

Knowing this approach of using kids to try to encourage parents to vaccinate their children at a time when mandates and masking protocols are no longer in existence, I sent a request to the city for comment.

“People who are vaccinated are still susceptible to contracting COVID-19, so what is this about?” I asked. “Is this trying to guilt families into vaccinating a child or some form of peer pressure? Is it trying to suggest families should keep unvaccinated (children) indoors?”



I sent these questions at 2:43 p.m. on Tuesday.

At 5:49 p.m., Ross emailed back with the decision to pull the ads.

“The pandemic has negatively impacted children in many different ways,” he said. “The video created was intended to highlight the negative impact it has had on children and drive home the benefits of vaccine, as vaccination remains the most effective way to protect our children, families, communities and ourselves against the serious effects of COVID-19.”

“As always, we continually review our communications to ensure it is effectively reaching the right audience with the right message,” Ross said. “We do believe we can better communicate this intent and, as such, we have removed the video to better address the core message of children being eligible to be vaccinated against COVID-19 — to protect them, their families, their friends and the community as a whole.”




One ad depicted a baby girl being filmed with a smart phone to be shared with loved ones who couldn’t be in the same room: “When can we see her?” asks an adult’s voice.

Another ad showed a woman running a business meeting over Zoom as her daughter enters the room followed by the tag line, “She should be in school.”

Another ad showed a boy trying to connect with a friend over a video call with the tagline, “Human connections are stronger than internet connections.”

There’s also one with a boy with his hand up in class, but it turns out he’s studying at home alone, and it includes the tagline, “Kids need a hand.”

All have been removed and the city is reviewing how this happened.

jwarmington@postmedia.com
 

spaminator

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Oct 26, 2009
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What 'most likely' caused the deaths of three of Stratford's iconic swans
“We’ve had some diseases on the river, but nothing like this"

Author of the article:Chris Montanini • Stratford Beacon Herald
Publishing date:Sep 21, 2022 • 21 hours ago • 2 minute read • Join the conversation
File photo. Chris MontaniniStratford Beacon Herald
File photo. Chris MontaniniStratford Beacon Herald jpg, SF

STRATFORD – Three of Stratford’s swans died over the weekend after showing symptoms of H5N1, the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus, city officials say.


Quin Malott, Stratford’s parks manager, said staff feeding the bevy on Saturday morning found the first swan dead in the Avon River.


The other two swans began looking ill afterwards, one on Sunday and the other on Monday.

Although test results were not confirmed as of Tuesday, both the city’s veterinarian and an avian pathologist at the University of Guelph’s Animal Health Laboratory reported that bird flu was the “most likely cause” of death, Malott said.

A dead turkey vulture was also found in Stratford on Monday.

“We’ve had some diseases on the river, but nothing like this,” Malott said. “(For) the staff and myself, it’s very frustrating. It’s sad to . . . lose these swans after you spend so much time taking care of them.”


This weekend’s wildlife deaths aren’t the first in Perth County to be linked to H5N1 this year. Stratford lost a swan due to the virus in May, shortly after two unwell fox kits discovered in St. Marys became the first mammals in Canada to be diagnosed with bird flu.

The discovery was a significant development in a global bird flu outbreak Canadian officials have been tracking since the virus was detected in Europe early last year. Surveillance efforts picked up in December when the virus was found in Newfoundland seagulls before spreading to birds across the rest of the country.

The outbreak’s largest impact has so far been felt in the Canadian poultry industry.

As of Tuesday, more than 2.3-million birds on 133 farms have been impacted by the virus, government data show. That includes approximately 561,000 birds on 28 farms in Ontario.


The Canadian Food Inspection Agency believes migratory birds are responsible for the outbreaks.

Malott said he believes local cases could rise again as those birds begin flying south for the winter.

Dead, injured, or sick swans found in Stratford’s park system should be reported to Malott at 519-271-0250 ext. 246. On the weekends, Malott said reports can be called into the Stratford Police Service’s non-emergency line.

Birds found on private property can be reported to the Canadian Wildlife Health Cooperative, which relies on government agencies, animal control offices, wildlife rehabilitation centres and the general public to help its monitoring efforts in Ontario. Contact information is available on the organization’s website.


The other members of Stratford’s famous bevy are doing well, Malott said, but the H5N1 outbreak remains a concern. Stratford has always discouraged hand feeding the birds near the Avon but has been stepping up efforts to keep the birds from gathering too closely while H5N1 transmission in the area is high.

“No matter what this is that’s killed these swans, it’s some type of virus so we just want to remind residents and visitors alike not to feed any of the wild fowl because it encourages gathering,” Malott said. “That’s where you’re going to get this kind of spread.”

The local humane society has also been picking up injured birds and sending for testing as needed. The city reminded residents on Tuesday not touch any dead, injured or sick birds that they find.

More information about avian influenza is available at canada.ca/avianflu.

cmontanini@postmedia.com
 

spaminator

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Oct 26, 2009
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Chelsea Hillier retracts defamation of Carleton prof after contempt of court conviction
Daughter of former MPP Randy Hillier defamed Esther Post in a series of social media posts, a judge ruled

Author of the article:Blair Crawford
Publishing date:Sep 21, 2022 • 18 hours ago • 3 minute read • Join the conversation
Files: Chelsea Hillier, like her father former Ontario MPP Randy Hillier, has been an outspoken opponent of COVID-19 public-health measures.
Files: Chelsea Hillier, like her father former Ontario MPP Randy Hillier, has been an outspoken opponent of COVID-19 public-health measures. PHOTO BY DEREK RUTTAN /POSTMEDIA/FILES
Three days before she is to be sentenced for contempt of court, Chelsea Hillier retracted her comments about Carleton English professor Esther Post and acknowledged they were false and defamatory.


Hillier is the daughter of former Lanark-Frontenac-Kingston MPP Randy Hillier and in June was found by Ontario Superior Court Justice Sally Gomery to have defamed Esther Post in a series of social media posts last year. She was ordered to retract the statement, which she didn’t do, resulting in her charge and conviction of contempt of court last week by Justice Narissa Somji. She is to be sentenced Friday.


In a tweet Tuesday afternoon, Hiller wrote: “In accordance with the June 24, 2022, order of Madam Justice Gomery in Post v Hillier, 2022 ONSC 3793, I hereby retract the statements I made about Esther Post (as detailed in Madam Justice Gomery’s reasons for decision) and acknowledge that they were false and defamatory.”


Post responded with tweets of her own. “Just 70 hours before sentencing, and 88 days after the deadline she was given by Justice Gomery, Chelsea Hillier has finally posted a retraction,” she wrote.

“It will count as an effort to purge one of of many instances of contempt and would be factored into sentencing, but it cannot undo the contempt that’s already occurred.”



The two women are former friends. Post was Hillier’s instructor at Carleton in 2008 and the two were close enough that Hillier attended Post’s wedding.

But that friendship was wrecked by political differences. Hillier is a former federal candidate for the People’s Party of Canada and last spring ran in her father’s old provincial riding for the Populist Party of Ontario, garnering just 324 votes. Like her controversial father, Chelsea Hillier has been an outspoken critic of COVID-19 masking and vaccination policies.

Last November, Post retweeted a thread critical of the Hilliers and the anti-vaccination protests that were occurring at hospitals, prompting Chelsea Hiller’s defamatory attack in which she claimed Post had drugged and slept with students.


Post lodged a complaint with Twitter and Hillier’s account was suspended for 60 days. But Hillier created a new account and continued her attack, accusing Post of “gaslighting” and being a “predator” and an “abuser.” Post sued for libel and won.

In her June 24 ruling, Gomery wrote that Hillier didn’t file a defence, but rather Hillier “and other Twitter users mocked Ms. Post for taking legal proceedings, saying she was greedy, mentally ill, and unable to care for her children.”

Hillier never apologized, Gomery wrote, but instead “doubled down on her publication of defamatory statements.”



“She has displayed contempt not only for Ms. Post, but for the idea that she is obliged to respect the norms of civilized behaviour observed by other members of society,” the judge wrote.


“Hillier’s obvious glee at the damage she was causing to a former friend is both sad and outrageous. She weaponized her Twitter accounts for vengeful and vindictive behaviour.”

Gomery ordered Hillier to retract the defamatory statement within 10 days, but did not order her to apologize, reasoning an apology would only cause more online harassment of Post.

“I do not see any point in forcing Ms. Hillier to post a statement expressing false regret and an insincere acknowledgement of the harm she has inflicted. Doing so may do more harm than good, as it could incite her followers to hurl further invective at Ms. Post,” Gomery wrote in her June ruling.

Hillier was charged with contempt of court for ignoring Gomery’s order to retract her statements. At her trial last week, in which she appeared without a lawyer, Hiller admitted that she had not read Gomery’s order and claimed she had lost control of her Twitter account. Somji noted, however, that Hillier had tweeted more than 600 times since the retraction order was given.

A GiveSendGo fundraiser that had been set up for Chelsea Hillier’s defence appeared to be taken offline on Wednesday.

Post declined to be interviewed about the contempt conviction or Hillier’s retraction, but in messages to this newspaper said she was “ecstatic” that Hillier had been found guilty of contempt.

Editor’s note: a previous version of this story incorrectly identified the judge who found Chelsea Hillier guilty of contempt. It has since been updated.
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
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City of Toronto pulls controversial vaccination ad campaign within hours
City spokesman Brad Ross acknowledges the ad campaign 'missed the mark'

Author of the article:Joe Warmington
Publishing date:Sep 21, 2022 • 21 hours ago • 3 minute read • 144 Comments
The City of Toronto has yanked five controversial ads aimed at encouraging parents to vaccinate their kids against COVID-19.
The City of Toronto has yanked five controversial ads aimed at encouraging parents to vaccinate their kids against COVID-19. PHOTO BY CITY OF TORONTO /YouTube
The City of Toronto has pulled a $20,000 video ad campaign encouraging families to vaccinate their kids, saying it “can do better.”


They removed the five ad spots just hours after release and following public and media backlash about the city’s use of children in these Public Service Announcements attempting to illustrate there are things in life that they can’t partake in without receiving a COVID-19 injection.


“We have pulled all of the videos for now while we undertake a review of each to determine if there are other issues we need to address,” said Toronto chief spokesperson Brad Ross. “I’m also undertaking a complete review of the approvals process for such videos.”

Each video cost the taxpayers $4,000 to produce.

“The campaign was developed by the ‘vaccine engagement team’ — a group of community ambassadors who have done a fabulous job of educating and reaching out to communities that are hard to reach, whether because of language barriers, cultural barriers or general hesitancy about vaccines,” said Ross.


“Toronto has one of the highest vaccination rates in the world, thanks in part to their efforts,” he said. “This is very much community-led, but there is ultimate approval required by the city, and it is here where I am working to understand how and why we missed the mark on this.”



The controversy began with an advertisement of a girl looking out the window and hearing her peers playing outside.

“Mom, can I go outside and play with my friends?” she asks.

“No honey, there’s still something going around,” her mom responds.

Then came the tagline stating, “Kids should be out there, not in here,” and that in Toronto “COVID-19 Vaccines available for children six months to 12 years.”

Needless to say, social media lit up.

“Disgusting propaganda and harmful to our children,” tweeted Monica Marchand.



Klo tweeted, “Many countries have banned vaccines for kids under 12. That ad suggests they will be segregated if they aren’t vaccinated.”

Knowing this approach of using kids to try to encourage parents to vaccinate their children at a time when mandates and masking protocols are no longer in existence, I sent a request to the city for comment.

“People who are vaccinated are still susceptible to contracting COVID-19, so what is this about?” I asked. “Is this trying to guilt families into vaccinating a child or some form of peer pressure? Is it trying to suggest families should keep unvaccinated (children) indoors?”



I sent these questions at 2:43 p.m. on Tuesday.

At 5:49 p.m., Ross emailed back with the decision to pull the ads.

“The pandemic has negatively impacted children in many different ways,” he said. “The video created was intended to highlight the negative impact it has had on children and drive home the benefits of vaccine, as vaccination remains the most effective way to protect our children, families, communities and ourselves against the serious effects of COVID-19.”

“As always, we continually review our communications to ensure it is effectively reaching the right audience with the right message,” Ross said. “We do believe we can better communicate this intent and, as such, we have removed the video to better address the core message of children being eligible to be vaccinated against COVID-19 — to protect them, their families, their friends and the community as a whole.”




One ad depicted a baby girl being filmed with a smart phone to be shared with loved ones who couldn’t be in the same room: “When can we see her?” asks an adult’s voice.

Another ad showed a woman running a business meeting over Zoom as her daughter enters the room followed by the tag line, “She should be in school.”

Another ad showed a boy trying to connect with a friend over a video call with the tagline, “Human connections are stronger than internet connections.”

There’s also one with a boy with his hand up in class, but it turns out he’s studying at home alone, and it includes the tagline, “Kids need a hand.”

All have been removed and the city is reviewing how this happened.

jwarmington@postmedia.com
kids are annoying. let them get sick and die. ;)
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
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Those who had COVID-19 at higher risk for brain injuries a year later: Study
Author of the article:postmedia News
Publishing date:Oct 02, 2022 • 11 hours ago • 1 minute read • Join the conversation
A study, published in Nature Medicine, looked at brain health using medical records from millions of U.S. veterans.

Those who had COVID-19 are at a higher risk for a number of brain injuries a year later, according to a new study.


The study, published in Nature Medicine, looked at brain health using medical records without patient identifiers from millions of U.S. veterans.


It found that brain or neurological disorders occurred in 7% more people who had been infected with COVID than with a similar group of veterans who had never been inflected.

“The results show the devastating long-term effects of COVID-19,” senior author Dr. Ziyad Al-Aly, of Washington University School of Medicine, said in a statement.

The medical records of 154,000 U.S. veterans who had tested positive for COVID from March 1, 2020 to Jan. 15, 2021 were studied. Their records were compared with those of 5.6 million Americans who did not have COVID during that time frame, plus another 5.8 million people from the period just before COVID arrived in the U.S.

Memory issues, also known as brain fog, were the most common symptom. The study found that people infected with COVID had a 77% higher risk of developing memory problems.

Strokes caused by blood clots were also 50% more likely amongst those who had been infected, the study found. Seizures were 80% more likely and mental health issues were 43% more likely.