COVID-19 'Pandemic'

Blackleaf

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AstraZeneca woes grow as Australia, Philippines, African Union curb COVID-19 shots
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Publishing date:Apr 08, 2021 • 7 hours ago • 3 minute read • Join the conversation
A pharmacist holds a vial of the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine in a pharmacy in Roubaix as part of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) vaccination campaign in France, March 15, 2021.
A pharmacist holds a vial of the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine in a pharmacy in Roubaix as part of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) vaccination campaign in France, March 15, 2021. PHOTO BY PASCAL ROSSIGNOL /REUTERS
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Australia and the Philippines limited use of AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine on Thursday, while the African Union dropped plans to buy the shot amid global shortages, dealing further blows to the company’s hopes to deliver a vaccine for the world.

The vaccine – developed with Oxford University and considered a frontrunner in the global vaccine race – has been plagued by safety concerns and supply problems since Phase III trial results were published in December, with Indonesia the latest country forced to seek doses from other drugmakers.


The Philippines suspended the use of AstraZeneca shots for people under age 60 after Europe’s regulator said on Wednesday it found rare cases of blood clots among some adult recipients, although it still believes that the vaccine’s benefits outweighed its risks.

Australia recommended people under 50 should get Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine in preference to AstraZeneca’s, a policy shift it warned would hold up its inoculation campaign.

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AstraZeneca’s shot is sold at cost, for a few dollars a dose. It is by far the cheapest and most high-volume launched so far, and has none of the extreme refrigeration requirements of some other COVID-19 vaccines, making it likely to be the mainstay of many inoculation programs in the developing world.

But more than a dozen countries have at one time suspended or partially suspended use of the shot, first on concerns about efficacy in older people, and now on worries about rare dangerous side effects in younger people.

That, coupled with production setbacks, will delay the rollout of vaccines across the globe as governments scramble to find alternatives to tame the pandemic that has killed more than 3 million.

‘EXTREMELY RARE’

Italy on Wednesday joined France, the Netherlands, Germany and others in recommending a minimum age for recipients of AstraZeneca’s shot, and Britain said people under 30 should get an alternative. South Korea also suspended use of the vaccine in people under 60 this week, while approving Johnson & Johnson’s one-dose vaccine.


AstraZeneca has said it is working with British and European regulators to list possible brain blood clots as “an extremely rare potential side-effect.”

South Africa also paused AstraZeneca vaccinations last month after a small trial showed the shot offered minimal protection against mild-to-moderate illness caused by the dominant local coronavirus variant.

AstraZeneca is grappling with production issues that have led to shortfalls of its vaccine in several countries.

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Indonesian Health Minister Budi Gunadi Sadikin said on Thursday the country was in talks with China on getting as many as 100 million COVID-19 vaccine doses to plug a gap in deliveries caused by delays in the arrival of AstraZeneca shots.

India has put a temporary hold on all major exports of AstraZeneca’s shot made by the Serum Institute of India (SII), the world’s biggest vaccine-maker, as domestic infections rise.

That has affected supplies to the GAVI/WHO-backed global COVAX vaccine-sharing facility through which 64 poorer countries are supposed to get doses from SII, the programme’s procurement and distributing partner UNICEF told Reuters last month.

GAVI and the World Health Organization said in a statement on Thursday that the facility had delivered nearly 38.4 million doses to more than 100 countries and economies across six continents, and expects to deliver doses to all participating economies that requested vaccines in the first half of the year.

AstraZeneca Chief Executive Pascal Soriot was quoted in the statement as saying more than 37 million doses of the company’s vaccine had been delivered through COVAX.

“We continue to work 24/7 to deliver on our unwavering commitment to broad, equitable and affordable access,” he said.

The African Union is exploring vaccine options with Johnson & Johnson, the head of the Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention said. It dropped plans to buy AstraZeneca’s shot from SII to avoid duplicating efforts by COVAX, which will continue to supply the vaccine to Africa.

Britain is slowing its vaccine rollout due to delays in a shipment of AstraZeneca shots from India and is at loggerheads with the EU over exports of the vaccine. Australia has also blamed delays in its immunization campaign on supply issues in Europe.

AstraZeneca has cited reduced yields at a European factory for the supply shortfall to the European Union.

Are they going to ban contraceptive pills and surgery, too? Because you are far more likely to get blood clots from those. If not, why not?
 

Blackleaf

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Why can’t we let the vaccines win?

The life-saving jabs have become a pretext for yet more restrictions.

Why can’t we let the vaccines win?

FRASER MYERS

ASSISTANT EDITOR

8th April 2021

Spiked

The vaccines were supposed to liberate us from lockdown. They have done no such thing. They are effective against the virus, of course – far more effective than many imagined possible, arriving far earlier than most experts had predicted. They cut the spread of the virus as well as reducing hospitalisation and death. And they are extraordinarily safe, too.

In Britain, the most vulnerable had all received their first dose of the vaccine by mid-February – eight weeks ago. The groups that make up 99 per cent of Covid mortalities have at least partial protection. UCL modelling (of course, modelling should always be taken with a pinch of salt, as we’ll see later) expects us to reach the herd-immunity threshold, through a combination of vaccines, infections and pre-existing immunity, by Monday.

But instead of celebrating this vaccine miracle, and claiming victory over the virus, something else entirely has happened. We are in the fourth month of Britain’s third lockdown, and the government is dreaming up yet more restrictions on our freedoms, just as we are getting excited about opening up.

We may be expected to take two rapid tests per week. We may need a ‘Covid status certificate’ to attend certain events and activities. Pubs and restaurants, when they reopen next week, will have more restrictions than they did pre-vaccine – each individual will have to sign the test-and-trace form (not just the leader), and you won’t be allowed inside (as you were in the days of Tier 1 and Tier 2) or even allowed to go inside to make payments.

Foreign holidays are in doubt, despite proceeding relatively normally last summer, due to a doomed attempt to stop the arrival of new variants in the UK – particularly vaccine-resistant variants which could derail the vaccine rollout. As well as protecting the NHS, we’re being asked to protect the vaccine.

Similarly, the prospect of ‘vaccine passports’ has turned what should have been the great liberatory leap forward into yet another pretext for removing our most basic freedoms – perhaps indefinitely. Despite vaccine take-up being higher than anyone expected – among the most enthusiastic in the entire world – the government wants to coerce the undecided into taking medical treatment with the threat of second-class citizenship. It would turn us into an authoritarian ‘papers, please’ society.

Wittingly or not, with their excessive caution, politicians and scientists are in serious danger of sending the message that the vaccines do not work as intended. Prime minister Boris Johnson recently told a Q&A session that two fully vaccinated people should not meet up indoors together. He surely understands the implications of this?

Modellers that feed into SAGE have predicted that lifting restrictions, even with the vaccines, could result in a summer bloodbath of up to hundreds of deaths per day. Last summer, despite the government encouraging us to herd into restaurants and crucially, no vaccines, deaths were in the single figures. At least it is an improvement on last month, when SAGE was warning of thousands of deaths per day.

And then there is the fear that the vaccines themselves could make us ill. The MHRA, the UK drugs regulator, was careful to say the emergence of blood clots was extremely rare among recipients of the AstraZeneca vaccine – finding that just 79 cases of blood clots and 19 related deaths occurred after 20million doses were administered. In other words, the AZ vaccine is less risky than many over-the-counter medicines or driving on the motorway. You are more likely to be struck by lightning than develop a blood clot. What’s more, the link between AZ and the blood clots is as yet unproven. Nevertheless, the regulator decided to advise that people under 30 should be given an alternative vaccine where doses are available. This may be a small ‘course correction’, as deputy CMO Jonathan Van Tam has suggested, and will hopefully have no impact on the rollout, but it gives a sense of how infinitesimally small a risk has to be to get our scientists worried.

One thing has become abundantly clear: the government and its advisers have institutionalised the precautionary principle. It is not ‘following science’ that has led us into this trap. It is a culture of excessive caution and risk-aversion. It is only in such a context that a life-saving vaccine can be turned into a tool for more restrictions. It’s time to stop living in fear – let’s take back our freedoms and live our lives to the fullest once more.

 

Blackleaf

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Why you are feeling pressured into having the vaccine​

The Behavioural Change Unit

***************

You couldn't bloody make it up if you tried​

*************

Day of Reflection? Here's my sodding reflections for you​

 

spaminator

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Man skier with backpack trekking on snow mountain with sunlight and storm.
Man skier with backpack trekking on snow mountain with sunlight and storm. PHOTO BY FILE PHOTO /Getty Images
MAN TRIES TO SKI OVER QUARANTINE RULES

A Norweigian man tried to avoid quarantine rules by skiing over the Norway-Sweden border.

It didn’t go to well for him, however.

According to Euronews, the unnamed 50-year-old recently had to go back to Norway in order to get some documents he needed for work in Sweden. But under Norwegian law, anyone travelling into the country must quarantine for 10 days in a hotel due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

In an attempt to avoid the quarantine rules, cops say the man tried to cross the border by skiing through the mountains. What he didn’t bargain for was the 40-kilometre trek.

After about 25 kilometres, the man got caught up in some turbulent weather. He was rescued by a reindeer breeder and later by two fishermen before rescue services arrived to pick him up.

The unnamed man was then handed over to police for violating quarantine rules. The attempted rule-breaker was reportedly angry and did not apologize for his stunt.

The man was later forced to quarantine in a hotel.

echau@postmedia.com
 

spaminator

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Canada's ICUs see near record of COVID-19 patients as new variant cases double over last week
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Publishing date:Apr 09, 2021 • 1 day ago • 4 minute read • Join the conversation
Canada's Chief Public Health Officer Dr. Theresa Tam attends a news conference as efforts continue to help slow the spread of COVID-19 in Ottawa, Canada March 23, 2020.
Canada's Chief Public Health Officer Dr. Theresa Tam attends a news conference as efforts continue to help slow the spread of COVID-19 in Ottawa, Canada March 23, 2020. PHOTO BY BLAIR GABLE /REUTERS
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The number of COVID-19 patients in intensive care units across the country has reached a near record as the spread of more contagious variants drives up hospitalizations, prompting Ontario officials to scale back on non-urgent procedures.

Canada’s chief public health officer says the number of new COVID-19 cases linked to variants of concern has doubled over the past week, with B.1.1.7, first identified in the U.K., “essentially replacing” pre-existing versions of the virus.


Dr. Theresa Tam said the predominance of these strains is fuelling a rapid COVID-19 resurgence that is sending more patients to hospital with severe illness, including young people, and threatens to push intensive care units to their limits.

“The race between the vaccine and the variants is at a critical point,” Tam told reporters Friday. “It is clear that we need stronger control to combat variants of concern that are driving rapid epidemic growth in many areas of the country.”

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Last week, hospitals treated an average of more than 2,500 patients with COVID-19 each day, up seven per cent from the previous week, said Tam.

That includes 860 patients in intensive care, she said, amounting to a 23 per cent increase over the previous week.

The recent rise in critical cases is approaching a peak seen earlier this year, when for the seven days ending Jan. 19 officials reported an average of 880 people in the ICU and 4,775 in hospital overall.

An average of more than 6,800 new cases and 30 deaths were reported daily over the past week, said Tam.

She said these numbers are consistent with the rapid resurgence trajectory outlined in federal forecasts two weeks ago.

Even as several provinces tightened public health restrictions this week, Tam warned that case counts will likely continue to climb as the fallout from holiday gatherings emerges.

“Many of my colleagues are of course worried about what happened at the Easter long weekend, so all of that will be playing out,” said Tam. “Right now, what is of concern to me is the ICUs filling up.”

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A medical worker fills a syringe with the AstraZeneca vaccine at a hospital in Tbilisi, Georgia March 16, 2021.
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Vials of the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine are seen during the opening of a vaccination centre at the Cypriot port of Larnaca, on March 22, 2021.
France opts for mRNA vaccine as second dose after AstraZeneca

To avoid this deadly scenario, Ontario hospitals have been instructed to start ramping down elective surgeries and non-urgent procedures next week to ensure they have resources to treat a growing number of COVID-19 patients.

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The president and CEO of Ontario Health — which oversees the province’s health system — told hospitals to make the move as the number of COVID-19 patients in the province’s intensive care units hit a new high.

“We are facing mounting and extreme pressure on our critical care capacity,” Matthew Anderson said in a memo issued Thursday night, asking hospitals to identify staff who may be redeployed to other sites if necessary.

There were 552 patients with COVID-related critical illness in Ontario intensive care units as of Friday morning, according to the Ministry of Health.

The province reported 4,227 new cases of COVID-19 and 18 additional deaths from the virus.

Premier Doug Ford said the province is doing its part to address the health-care capacity crunch by ramping up its vaccine rollout to give 40 per cent of adults in Ontario their first shot over the next four weeks.

“The quicker we can get these vaccines into people’s arms, the quicker they’re going to be able to resume the surgeries,” Ford said.

In Saskatchewan, a group of 285 doctors banded together to urge the provincial government to implement stricter COVID-19 health measures and vaccinate younger essential workers.

The letter sent on Friday to Premier Scott Moe and Health Minister Paul Merriman says intensive care admissions are at an all-time high with younger, previously healthy people.

Provincial health officials reported 358 new cases of COVID-19 in the province and six new deaths.

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Also on Friday, Quebec announced a new single-day record of 69,148 COVID-19 vaccines administered on Thursday as stricter public health protocols take hold in some parts of the province.

The provincial government has extended a health order in Quebec City, Levis, Gatineau and several municipalities in the Beauce region until at least April 18. Emergency measures include closing schools and non-essential businesses in those areas and applying an 8 p.m. curfew.

Starting Sunday, Montreal and Laval will also return to an 8 p.m. curfew.

Quebec reported 1,683 new COVID-19 cases Friday and eight more deaths related to the virus. There were 569 hospitalizations and 134 people in intensive care, said health officials.

Meanwhile, Manitoba lowered the minimum age for vaccination to 40 and older for First Nations people, and 60 and older for others.

Health officials reported 179 new cases on Friday, the biggest daily jump since late January. The province also detected 37 more infections linked to variants.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau told a news conference that the federal government has delivered more than 10.5 million doses of COVID-19 vaccines to the provinces and territories.

Canada is expected to have received at least 44 million doses from Pfizer, Moderna and AstraZeneca by the end of June, Trudeau said.
 

spaminator

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Norway prime minister fined for flouting COVID-19 rules
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Publishing date:Apr 09, 2021 • 1 day ago • 1 minute read • Join the conversation
Norwegian Prime Minister Erna Solberg visits troops of the NATO enhanced Forward Presence Battle Group in Pabrade, Lithuania Sept. 8, 2020.
Norwegian Prime Minister Erna Solberg visits troops of the NATO enhanced Forward Presence Battle Group in Pabrade, Lithuania Sept. 8, 2020. PHOTO BY INTS KALNINS /REUTERS
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OSLO — Norwegian police said on Friday they have fined Prime Minister Erna Solberg for breaking COVID-19 social distancing rules when organizing a family gathering to celebrate her birthday.

The fine is for 20,000 Norwegian crowns ($2,946) police chief Ole Saeverud told a news conference.


The two-term prime minister apologized last month for organizing an event to celebrate her 60th birthday with 13 family members at a mountain resort in late February, despite a government ban on events attended by more than 10 people.

While the police would not have issued a fine in most such cases, the prime minister has been at the forefront of the government’s work to impose restrictions, the police said.

“Though the law is the same for all, all are not equal in front of the law,” said Saeverud, justifying the fine.
 

spaminator

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J&J COVID-19 vaccine under EU review over blood clots, AstraZeneca probe grows
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Pushkala Aripaka and Manas Mishra
Publishing date:Apr 09, 2021 • 1 day ago • 2 minute read • Join the conversation
Vials of COVID-19 vaccines of Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna and AstraZeneca are pictured at St. Mary's Hospital, in Phoenix Park in Dublin, Ireland, Feb. 14, 2021.
Vials of COVID-19 vaccines of Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna and AstraZeneca are pictured at St. Mary's Hospital, in Phoenix Park in Dublin, Ireland, Feb. 14, 2021. PHOTO BY CLODAGH KILCOYNE /REUTERS
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Europe’s drug regulator said it is reviewing reports of rare blood clots in four people who received Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine and has expanded its probe into AstraZeneca’s shot to include reports of a bleeding condition.

Of the four serious cases of clotting and low platelets, three occurred in the United States during the rollout of J&J’s vaccine from its Janssen unit, the European Medicines Agency (EMA) said on Friday, adding that one person had died and that one case was reported in a clinical trial.


It was the first news of EMA’s probe of the J&J vaccine, while AstraZeneca’s coronavirus vaccine has been dogged for weeks over possible links to rare blood clots in the brain and abdomen, which the EMA has confirmed.

U.S.-based J&J said that it was aware of the reports of blood clots possibly related to its COVID-19 vaccine and others, and is working with regulators to assess the data and provide relevant information.

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“At present, no clear causal relationship has been established between these rare events and the Janssen COVID-19 vaccine,” the company said in an emailed statement.

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The EMA also said that it was not yet clear if there was a link between the two vaccines and the reported conditions, and that its safety committee will decide if regulatory action such as label changes were needed.


Some countries in Europe and Asia have restricted the use of AstraZeneca’s vaccine, Vaxzevria, in younger people following an update by EU and UK regulators this week that found a link between the events and the shot. Regulators have said the benefits of the vaccine outweigh the risks.

J&J’s single-dose vaccine has been approved for EU use, but a rollout is yet to begin. It is mainly being used in the United States currently.

The EMA also said five cases of capillary leak syndrome in people who received AstraZeneca’s vaccine were reported.

The condition, in which blood leaks from the smallest of vessels into muscles and body cavities, is characterized by swelling and a drop in blood pressure. AstraZeneca did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The J&J and AstraZeneca shots are two of the four approved COVID-19 vaccinations in Europe.
 

spaminator

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South African variant can 'break through' Pfizer vaccine: Israeli study
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Maayan Lubell
Publishing date:Apr 10, 2021 • 3 hours ago • 2 minute read • Join the conversation
Nurse Enes Cigdem prepares a dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech coronavirus disease (COVID-19) vaccine at Dr. Feriha Oz Emergency Hospital in Istanbul, Turkey, April 9, 2021.
Nurse Enes Cigdem prepares a dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech coronavirus disease (COVID-19) vaccine at Dr. Feriha Oz Emergency Hospital in Istanbul, Turkey, April 9, 2021. PHOTO BY UMIT BEKTAS /REUTERS
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JERUSALEM — The coronavirus variant discovered in South Africa can “break through” Pfizer/BioNTech’s COVID-19 vaccine to some extent, a real-world data study in Israel found, though its prevalence in the country is low and the research has not been peer reviewed.

The study, released on Saturday, compared almost 400 people who had tested positive for COVID-19, 14 days or more after they received one or two doses of the vaccine, against the same number of unvaccinated patients with the disease. It matched age and gender, among other characteristics.


The South African variant, B.1.351, was found to make up about 1% of all the COVID-19 cases across all the people studied, according to the study by Tel Aviv University and Israel’s largest healthcare provider, Clalit.

But among patients who had received two doses of the vaccine, the variant’s prevalence rate was eight times higher than those unvaccinated – 5.4% versus 0.7%.

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This suggests the vaccine is less effective against the South African variant, compared with the original coronavirus and a variant first identified in Britain that has come to comprise nearly all COVID-19 cases in Israel, the researchers said.

“We found a disproportionately higher rate of the South African variant among people vaccinated with a second dose, compared to the unvaccinated group. This means that the South African variant is able, to some extent, to break through the vaccine’s protection,” said Tel Aviv University’s Adi Stern.

The researchers cautioned, though, that the study only had a small sample size of people infected with the South African variant because of its rarity in Israel.


They also said the research was not intended to deduce overall vaccine effectiveness against any variant, since it only looked at people who had already tested positive for COVID-19, not at overall infection rates.

Pfizer and BioNTech could not be immediately reached for comment outside business hours.

The companies said on April 1 that their vaccine was around 91% effective at preventing COVID-19, citing updated trial data that included participants inoculated for up to six months.

In respect to the South African variant, they said that among a group of 800 study volunteers in South Africa, where B.1.351 is widespread, there were nine cases of COVID-19, all of which occurred among participants who got the placebo. Of those nine cases, six were among individuals infected with the South African variant.

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Some previous studies have indicated that the Pfizer/BioNTech shot was less potent against the B.1.351 variant than against other variants of the coronavirus, but still offered a robust defense.

While the results of the study may cause concern, the low prevalence of the South African strain was encouraging, according to Stern.

“Even if the South African variant does break through the vaccine’s protection, it has not spread widely through the population,” said Stern, adding that the British variant may be “blocking” the spread of the South African strain.

Almost 53% of Israel’s 9.3 million population has received both Pfizer doses. Israel has largely reopened its economy in recent weeks while the pandemic appears to be receding, with infection rates, severe illness and hospitalizations dropping sharply. About a third of Israelis are below the age of 16, which means they are still not eligible for the shot.
 

spaminator

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Canada nearing peak of next wave of COVID-19, Tam says as Ontario sets case record
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Morgan Lowrie
Publishing date:Apr 11, 2021 • 12 hours ago • 3 minute read • Join the conversation
Chief Public Health Officer Dr. Theresa Tam and Dr. Howard Njoo, Deputy Chief Public Health Officer, make their way to hold a press conference during the COVID-19 pandemic in Ottawa on Friday, Dec. 18, 2020.
Chief Public Health Officer Dr. Theresa Tam and Dr. Howard Njoo, Deputy Chief Public Health Officer, make their way to hold a press conference during the COVID-19 pandemic in Ottawa on Friday, Dec. 18, 2020. PHOTO BY SEAN KILPATRICK /The Canadian Press
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Canada is nearing the peak of the current wave of COVID-19, the country’s chief public health officer said Sunday as Ontario reported a new single-day record for new infections and provinces brought in new restrictions to contain the virus’ spread.

Dr. Theresa Tam described the current rash of nationwide infections as the pandemic’s second wave, though public health officials in several provinces are describing their recent daily case surges as a third wave.


“With the current acceleration of COVID-19 activity, approaching the peak of the second wave, and a concerning rise in the proportion of cases that involve more contagious variants of concern, strong public health measures and individual precautions must be sustained where COVID-19 is circulating,” Tam said in a statement.

Tam said intensive care admissions across the country increased by 23 per cent over the last seven days compared to the week before, noting the spike is straining the country’s health-care system.

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She said COVID-19 infections and hospitalizations are increasingly affecting younger people, adding figures show a jump in the number of hospitalizations among those 40 to 59 years old.

“These data also show that an increased number of adults in this age group were admitted to intensive care units (ICU) and received mechanical ventilation in March 2021,” her statement said.

The percentage of patients in intensive care who were aged 18 to 39 also doubled from January to March, from 7.4 per cent to 15 per cent of the total.

Tam’s statement came as Ontario reported a record 4,456 cases of COVID-19 in a 24-hour period.


The latest figures showed 21 additional deaths associated with the virus and a sharp rise of new cases in Toronto, which jumped by nearly 400 to 1,353.

Hospitalization rates in the province have been climbing steadily, prompting the province to order facilities to scale back elective surgeries starting on Monday.

A hospital at the centre of an outbreak in northwestern New Brunswick is also feeling pandemic-related strain, with seven of its nine intensive care beds filled with patients fighting COVID-19.

Local health authorities said the Edmundston Regional Hospital had 13 patients sick with the virus, with seven in intensive care and five on respirators.

Parts of the northwest were placed in lockdown as of Sunday following a recent rise in cases. In the afternoon, health authorities announced that municipal elections would be suspended in regions under lockdown, which include Edmundston, Upper-Madawaska, Lac Baker, Riviere-Verte, Sainte-Anne-de-Madawaska and Saint Leonard.

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Rules are also being tightened in Quebec, where a nighttime curfew is being moved to 8 p.m. from 9:30 as of Sunday evening in Montreal and neighbouring Laval to stave off a rise in cases.

The province reported 1,535 new infections on Sunday, as well as a 25-person jump in hospitalizations — numbers the province’s health minister described as “worrisome.”

Premier Francois Legault already imposed the 8 p.m. curfew in some other hot spots including Quebec City and Gatineau, which are currently under special lockdown measures.

In British Columbia, health authorities announced they will offer vaccines to all adults living in the ski community of Whistler beginning Monday. Whistler residents account for the majority of cases in Howe Sound, which has the highest rate of COVID-19 of any local health area in the province.

Saskatchewan said it continues to set new records for the number of vaccines administered in a single day with 13,170 on Saturday.

Authorities said half of Saskatchewan residents who are 50 and older have now received their first dose, after recently expanding the provincial booking system eligibility to everyone 55 and up.

That province reported 321 new cases on Sunday, while Manitoba logged 112 and Alberta counted 1,183.

Atlantic provinces continued to record comparatively low infection rates, with New Brunswick reporting nine new cases and Nova Scotia adding five to its tally.
 

Danbones

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Funny enough, a completely blanked page.


Theresa Tam has been working with the World Health Organization (WHO) since at least 2003, during the SARS outbreak (2). Tam was an advisor for WHO at around the time the virus that causes Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) traveled through the Catholic Church’s Erasmus University in Rotterdam, Netherlands to Canada’s only biosafety level 4 (BSL4) lab. The sample had come from an infected person in Saudi Arabia (3).

Shortly after the virus arrived in Canada, at the National Microbiology Laboratory in Winnipeg, WHO announced that Tam was on their MERS emergency advisory committee, consisting of 15 people, including Dr. Ziad Memish, the Minister of Health in Saudi Arabia and Dr. Martin Cetron, head of global migration and quarantine at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (4). It appears that Theresa Tam is one of the people who represents those who make the decisions as far as how viruses and other dangerous pathogens are moved around the world.

Does this make Theresa Tam a puppet or master?

bill-gates-has-been-controlling-who

Bill Gates admits plans to reduce population through use of vaccines

 
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