Black Lives Matter-Ugliness of Racism.

spaminator

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Texas man convicted for driveway slaying of Moroccan immigrant

Author of the article:
Associated Press
Associated Press
Lockhart, Texas
Published Nov 03, 2023 • 1 minute read


A Texas man has been convicted of manslaughter in the fatal shooting of a Moroccan immigrant who had pulled into the driveway.


A Caldwell County jury on Thursday rejected a murder charge and convicted 67-year-old Terry Duane Turner of the lesser count in the October 2021 shooting death of 31-year-old Adil Dghoughi outside Turner’s home in Martindale, about 30 miles (50 kilometres) south of Austin.


Family members of Dghoughi, who lived in Austin, have said he was lost and prosecutors said he was trying to leave the driveway when he was shot.

Turner said he shot in self-defense and testified that he thought Dghoughi pointed a gun at him, but no weapon was found inside the vehicle. Turner testified that he was concerned someone was trying to rob or harm him when he saw a strange vehicle in his driveway about 3:30 a.m., grabbed a gun and then went outside to confront the driver,


Defense attorney Gerry Morris said that that although Turner couldn’t see Dghoughi through the car’s windows, it was reasonable for Turner to believe the driver might have a gun.

“Based on what he saw, knowing all the circumstances, he was reasonable in his actions,” Morris said during the trial. “He pulled the trigger. He regrets it. He’ll regret it all his life.”

Morris declined comment following the verdict.

Turner faces 2 to 20 years in prison when sentenced.

Dghoughi came to the U.S. in 2012 from Morocco and attended Johnson & Wales University in Rhode Island, where he graduated with a master’s degree in business administration and finance, family members have said.

Dghoughi then moved to Austin and was seeking work as a financial analyst, according to his family.
 

spaminator

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Prosecutor says cop who used neck hold on Elijah McClain should be convicted

Author of the article:
Associated Press
Associated Press
Colleen Slevin And Matthew Brown
Published Nov 03, 2023 • 3 minute read


DENVER — A Colorado prosecutor told jurors in closing arguments Friday that a police officer who stopped Elijah McClain, put the 23-year old Black man in a neck hold and then abandoned him as his condition deteriorated should be convicted of manslaughter in his 2019 death.


Aurora Officer Nathan Woodyard is among three officers and two paramedics charged in the death of McClain after protests over the 2020 killing of George Floyd renewed interest in the case. The trial against the two other officers resulted in a split verdict last month with one convicted of homicide and one acquitted.


Woodyard was the first officer to confront McClain as the massage therapist walked home from a convenience store in the Denver suburb of Aurora. A 17-year-old 911 caller had reported McClain — who was listening to music, wearing a mask and dancing as he walked — as suspicious.

“Elijah McClain was walking home, he was dancing. As he told the defendant he was stopping the music to listen,” Colorado Assistant Attorney General Jason Slothouber told jurors. “There was no need for this escalation of violence.”


Woodyard put McClain in a neck hold that rendered him temporarily unconscious after he allegedly resisted and went for another officer’s gun — a claim prosecutors disputed. McClain was later injected with a fatal overdose of ketamine by paramedics.

The defendant’s lawyers stressed through the weekslong trial that the officer stepped away during part of the nighttime confrontation and was not with McClain as his condition worsened and other officers continued to restrain him.

Woodyard also faces a lesser charge of criminally negligent homicide. He could be sentenced to years in prison if convicted on either charge.

McClain’s mother, Sheneen, sat in the front row as the attorneys made their arguments to the 12-person jury.


Sheneen McClain had expressed disappointment after the first trial last month. It ended with officer Jason Rosenblatt acquitted of all charges and officer Randy Roedema convicted of the least serious charges he faced — criminally negligent homicide and third-degree assault — which could lead to a sentence of anywhere from probation to prison time.

Paramedics Jeremy Cooper and Lt. Peter Cichuniec are scheduled to go on trial later this month. They have pleaded not guilty.

The coroner office’s autopsy report, updated in 2021, found McClain died of an overdose of ketamine that was given after he was forcibly restrained by police. While it found no evidence the police actions contributed to McClain’s death, prosecutors presented their own medical expert who said there was a direct link. Dr. Roger Mitchell of Howard University, the former Washington, D.C. coroner, said the police restraint caused a series of cascading health problems, including difficulty breathing and a buildup of acid in McClain’s body.


Prosecutors have also argued that the police encouraged paramedics to give McClain ketamine by saying he had symptoms, like having increased strength, that indicate a controversial condition known as excited delirium that has been associated with racial bias against Black men.

In both trials, defense attorneys sought to blame McClain’s death on the paramedics.

But while attorneys in the first trial suggested McClain bore some responsibility for his medical decline by struggling with police, Woodyard’s lawyers, Megan Downing and Andrew Ho, have seemed more sympathetic to him.

Prosecutors have portrayed Woodyard’s actions as abandoning McClain and suggested he was more worried about administrative concerns, such as a possible investigation, rather than how McClain was doing.


Unlike the other officers, Woodyard also took the stand, testifying this week that he put McClain in the carotid control hold because he feared for his life after he heard McClain say, “I intend to take my power back” and Roedema say, “He just grabbed your gun, dude.”

The defense argued Woodyard had to react to what he heard in the moment.

Prosecutors contended McClain never tried to grab an officer’s weapon, and it can’t be seen in body camera footage, which is shaky and dark before all the cameras fall off during the ensuing struggle.

Prosecutors say Woodyard grabbed McClain within eight seconds of getting out of his patrol car without introducing himself or explaining why he wanted to talk to McClain. McClain, seemingly caught off guard, tried to keep walking. The encounter quickly escalated.
 

spaminator

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South Carolina city pays $500K to man whose false arrest sparked 2021 protests

Author of the article:
Associated Press
Associated Press
Jeffrey Collins
Published Nov 03, 2023 • 1 minute read


COLUMBIA, S.C. — A South Carolina city is paying a $500,000 settlement to a man whose treatment by a police officer during what turned out to be a false arrest led to days of protests.


An attorney for Travis Price said the city of Rock Hill defamed Price by suggesting he was the aggressor in a June 2021 confrontation while he checked on his brother, who was being arrested after a traffic stop. A statement from police said Price bumped an officer and was “yelling belligerently.”


But a video posted to Facebook showed an officer grabbing Price by the chest and pushing him into a nearby propane tank. The officer pinned Price down and yelled at him to fight.

“Mr. Price is a father of three and a family man whose reputation was unduly impacted following the incident by statements put out by the city of Rock Hill. He was innocent and this settlement will allow him to move forward and continue to work hard to provide for his family,” Price’s attorney Justin Bamberg said in a statement.

Charges against Price were dropped. Officer Jonathan Moreno was fired and apologized two weeks later, but was found not guilty of misdemeanor battery and assault.

Court records show he was dropped from Price’s lawsuit after the settlement with Rock Hill was reached.

Rock Hill officials didn’t respond to an email seeking comment.



The Facebook video of Price’s arrest led to days of protests in the city of 75,000 just south of Charlotte, North Carolina.

Nearly a dozen demonstrators were arrested as bottles and firecrackers were thrown and a line of officers in riot gear at one point stood outside the police station to keep people away.

Price sued to ensure that police departments don’t smear the reputations of innocent people, Bamberg said.

“We are confident that that message will be delivered loud and clear,” Bamberg said.
 
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spaminator

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California cop involved in controversial shooting resigns over racist texts, chief says
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Published Nov 05, 2023 • 1 minute read

SAN JOSE, Calif. — A California police officer involved in a controversial shooting last year has resigned after the discovery of racist text messages he wrote, including some making light of the shooting, a police chief says.


Mark McNamara, who joined the San Jose Police Department in 2017, quit last week after being notified of an investigation into his offensive messages, Police Chief Anthony Mata told the Bay Area News Group.


Mata said McNamara was being investigated by the department’s internal affairs unit for an unrelated and unspecified matter, and that led to the revelation that he “had sent disgusting text messages that demonstrated racial bias.”

A dossier of text messages show McNamara talking to two unnamed recipients and referring to the March 27, 2022, shooting of K’aun Green, according to the chief.

McNamara shot and wounded Green, who is Black, after Green appeared to have quelled a fight that broke out inside an eatery near San Jose State University. Green disarmed one of the people in the fight, and was backing out of the front door, holding a confiscated handgun in the air, when he was shot, according to police.


In a text message dated the day after the shooting, McNamara appears to refer to Green with a racial slur. Other messages from June 2023 appear to have been sent while McNamara was being interviewed by the City Attorney’s Office and Green’s legal team, which sued the city over the shooting.

Adante Pointer, whose firm Lawyers for the People is representing Green, said the messages affirmed to him that the shooting of his client “was driven by racial animus.”

Contact information for McNamara could not be found Sunday.

San Jose Police Officers’ Association President Steve Slack said the text message investigation “is a disconcerting reminder that not everyone has the moral compass necessary to be in the law enforcement profession … This behavior is beyond unacceptable, and we condemn it in the strongest possible terms.”
 

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California cop involved in controversial shooting resigns over racist texts, chief says
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Published Nov 05, 2023 • 1 minute read

SAN JOSE, Calif. — A California police officer involved in a controversial shooting last year has resigned after the discovery of racist text messages he wrote, including some making light of the shooting, a police chief says.


Mark McNamara, who joined the San Jose Police Department in 2017, quit last week after being notified of an investigation into his offensive messages, Police Chief Anthony Mata told the Bay Area News Group.


Mata said McNamara was being investigated by the department’s internal affairs unit for an unrelated and unspecified matter, and that led to the revelation that he “had sent disgusting text messages that demonstrated racial bias.”

A dossier of text messages show McNamara talking to two unnamed recipients and referring to the March 27, 2022, shooting of K’aun Green, according to the chief.

McNamara shot and wounded Green, who is Black, after Green appeared to have quelled a fight that broke out inside an eatery near San Jose State University. Green disarmed one of the people in the fight, and was backing out of the front door, holding a confiscated handgun in the air, when he was shot, according to police.


In a text message dated the day after the shooting, McNamara appears to refer to Green with a racial slur. Other messages from June 2023 appear to have been sent while McNamara was being interviewed by the City Attorney’s Office and Green’s legal team, which sued the city over the shooting.

Adante Pointer, whose firm Lawyers for the People is representing Green, said the messages affirmed to him that the shooting of his client “was driven by racial animus.”

Contact information for McNamara could not be found Sunday.

San Jose Police Officers’ Association President Steve Slack said the text message investigation “is a disconcerting reminder that not everyone has the moral compass necessary to be in the law enforcement profession … This behavior is beyond unacceptable, and we condemn it in the strongest possible terms.”
Good, he should resign as all police officers who don't do their jobs! That is called "common sense."
 

Twin_Moose

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Twin Moose Creek
Bwahahahaha

 

spaminator

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Cali teen suspended following 'blackface' allegation at football game
The alleged incident happened back on Oct. 13

Author of the article:Jane Stevenson
Published Nov 14, 2023 • 2 minute read
A Grade 8 student in La Jolla, Calif., has reportedly been suspended for allegedly wearing “blackface” to a local football game.
A Grade 8 student in La Jolla, Calif., has reportedly been suspended for allegedly wearing “blackface” to a local football game.
A Grade 8 student in La Jolla, Calif., has reportedly been suspended for allegedly wearing “blackface” to a local football game.


However, a national civil rights group called the Foundation for Individual Rights and Expression (FIRE) claims the boy — identified only as J.A. for privacy reasons — was wearing black eye paint to reflect any glare as many football players do.


According to the New York Post, the student was photographed on Oct. 13 attending a high school football game between La Jolla High School and Morse High School with dark face paint covering his cheeks and chin.

“We had a fun, great night without any trouble,” the boy’s father told Cal Coast News.

That is, until, a week after the game, the Muirland Middle School principal called the boy’s family to say he’d face a two-day suspension and was banned from attending any future sports events.


Cal Coast News reported that a disciplinary notice said J.A. “painted his face black at a football game” and characterized it as an “offensive comment, intent to harm.”



The principal also reportedly said the face paint was offensive because Morse High School is “largely black,” according to the publication.

However, FIRE sent a Nov. 8 letter to the principal, claiming he violated the boy’s First Amendment right, and called for the decision to be reversed.

“As the First Amendment protects J.A.’s non-disruptive expression of team spirit via a style commonly used by athletes and fans — notwithstanding your inaccurate description of it as ‘blackface’ — FIRE calls on the school to remove the infraction from J.A.’s disciplinary record and lift the ban on his attendance at future athletic events,” wrote Aaron Terr, FIRE’S director of public advocacy.

Terr said J.A’s “appearance emulated the style of eye black worn by many athletes,” noting that “such use of eye black began as a way to reduce glare during games,” which is different from blackface as in “‘dark makeup worn to mimic the appearance of a Black person and especially to mock or ridicule Black people.’