Black Lives Matter-Ugliness of Racism.

Tecumsehsbones

Hall of Fame Member
Mar 18, 2013
56,741
7,676
113
Washington DC
This is a good description.

On these facts, I tentatively conclude (pending more evidence) that the deputy committed a few violations of policy, but not criminal homicide.
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
36,513
3,144
113
New York judge fired for pointing gun at Black man in court
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Maysoon Khan
Published Oct 19, 2023 • 2 minute read

ALBANY, N.Y. — An upstate New York judge who pointed a loaded handgun at a Black man during a 2015 court hearing was removed from office Thursday by the state’s highest court.


Justice Robert J. Putorti was a Whitehall Town and Village Court judge. He repeatedly emphasized the race and stature of the litigant when recounting the episode, sometimes boastfully, according to an independent review by the New York State Court of Appeals. Putorti had said he aimed the gun at the man because he approached the stand too quickly, crossing a stop line for litigants.


In one instance, Putorti described the defendant to another judge as being 6 feet 9 inches tall (206 cm) and “built like a football player.” In reality, the man was only 6 feet (183 cm) and 165 pounds (75 kg), the decision noted.

The high court affirmed the state Commission on Judicial Conduct’s removal of Putorti, and noted the former judge’s description of the defendant “exploited a classic and common racist trope that Black men are inherently threatening or dangerous, exhibiting bias or, at least, implicit bias.”


Putorti’s lack of remorse after the gun episode contributed to his removal, according to the decision.

Putorti also participated in prohibited fundraising events to benefit the Elks Lodge, where he also held office, which occurred while he was under investigation for the gun episode.

While the fundraising would not itself warrant a removal, its timing and the fact that it happened while Putorti was under investigation showed “an unwillingness or inability to abide by the Rules of Judicial Conduct,” the decision noted.

Phone messages left for Putorti’s lawyers at Cerio Law Offices in Syracuse were not immediately returned.

“It is indefensible and inimical to the role of a judge to brandish a loaded weapon in court, without provocation or justification, then brag about it repeatedly with irrelevant racial remarks,” said Robert H. Tembeckjian, administrator for the state’s Commission on Judicial Conduct, in a statement. “The Court’s ruling today makes clear that there is no place on the bench for one who behaves this way.”
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
36,513
3,144
113
Police dog's attack on Black trucker in Ohio echoes history
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Patrick Orsagos
Published Oct 22, 2023 • 5 minute read
This image taken from police body cam video shows a police dog attacking Jadarrius Rose, 23, of Memphis, Tenn., on Tuesday, July 4, 2023, in Circleville, Ohio.
This image taken from police body cam video shows a police dog attacking Jadarrius Rose, 23, of Memphis, Tenn., on Tuesday, July 4, 2023, in Circleville, Ohio. PHOTO BY OHIO STATE HIGHWAY PATROL /THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CIRCLEVILLE, Ohio — As Jadarrius Rose drove his 18-wheeler through rural Ohio, a simple missing mudflap caught the highway patrol’s eye. The trip ended with a police dog’s powerful jaws clamping down on Rose even as he tried to surrender.


As he stood with his hands up beside the highway on July 4, at least six law enforcement officers surrounded him at a distance, one calling forcefully to the K-9 handler: “Do not release the dog,” highway patrol video shows.


Nevertheless, a Belgian Malinois is seen on the video either breaking free or being set loose. At first, the animal seems confused, racing past Rose toward officers at the far end of the truck, then turning back and running for Rose, then 23.

By then the trucker is on his knees, hands still high, as an officer shouts, “Get the dog off of him!”

That day, Rose joined a long list of Black Americans attacked by police dogs, a history well documented by journalists, academics and filmmakers. Investigations into such cases have been launched regularly in recent years. For some, the scenes harken back to the Civil Rights Movement, when authorities often turned dogs and firehoses on peaceful Black protesters marching for equality.


The Associated Press captured one such attack in a photograph from Birmingham, Alabama, taken in the spring of 1963. It shows two police officers setting a pair of K-9s on 15-year-old Walter Gadsden. One of the dogs lunges straight for the teenager’s belly as the other strains against his leash, panting.

Over the past five years, controversial police K-9 attacks have made headlines across the U.S.

Records reviewed by the AP in 2018 showed the Ohio State Highway Patrol used drug dogs in 28% of its stops involving Black motorists from 2013 through 2017, although the Black population accounts for only about 11.5% of people old enough to have a driver’s permit or license in the state.

The Salt Lake City police department suspended its dog apprehension program in 2020 after a Black man was bitten and an audit found 27 dog bite cases during the previous two years.


The FBI opened an investigation into the police department in Woodson Terrace, Missouri, in 2021 after cellphone video showed three officers allowing a dog to repeatedly bite a Black man. And in 2020, a Black man in Lafayette, Indiana, was placed in a medically induced coma after police dogs mauled him as he was arrested in a battery case.

A TROUBLED HISTORY

Circleville, located about 25 miles (40 km) south of Columbus, Ohio, resembles many rural towns across the country. The city’s downtown is filled with restaurants, law offices and a bakery. Flags honoring fallen servicemen and women hang from lampposts lining Main Street.

While the picture may be idyllic to some of the town’s 14,000 residents, the Rev. Derrick Holmes, longtime leader of the Second Baptist Church, said Black and white residents describe their lives very differently.


“Everyone doesn’t have the same experience, even though they’re all in the same town,” Holmes said. “And I think those divisions exist around the realities of bigotry, the realities of racism.”

At church services the day after the video of Rose’s arrest aired, Holmes said the congregation was appalled, but not entirely surprised.

“People were horrified by it,” he said. “Angered by it. Frustrated by it. And also there was a feeling of, ‘Well, here we go again.”‘

This isn’t the first time Circleville police have grappled with uncomfortable questions about how they train and use police dogs. Nearly 20 years ago, a founder of the K-9 unit sued the department after he was fired for insubordination. Officer David Haynes had publicly opposed cutting training hours for dogs and their handlers to 172 hours annually from 500 hours, according to court documents.


Haynes warned in a 2003 memo that “words like ‘deliberate indifference,’ ‘negligence’ and ‘failure to train’ will someday be brought up.”

Today, Circleville’s K-9s train 16 hours per month, or 192 hours a year, according to the department. Police Chief Shawn Baer did not respond to numerous messages seeking comment.

Employing dogs to dominate a population can be traced back at least to European settlers colonizing the Americas, when the animals were used against Indigenous people. They were introduced in Southern U.S. states to capture — and sometimes kill — enslaved Black people who escaped, said Madalyn Wasilczuk, a University of South Carolina professor and author of a law journal article titled, ” The Racialized Violence of Police Canine Force.”


Wasilczuk found data on K-9 police attacks sparse, but said the animals are often used in nonviolent situations and their presence can lead to serious injury.

“When you talk about an apprehension, police talk about bite and hold, and that sounds very antiseptic,” Wasilczuk said. “But when you look at a video of what happens, you see a dog doing what it does with a chew toy, which is it grabs on, it tries to hold on, its head whips back and forth and its teeth are sunk into that body part as deeply as they can.”

THE AFTERMATH

In Rose’s case, law enforcement originally sought to pull him over because of his truck’s missing mudflap, according to a highway patrol report. Circleville Police were there to assist.

What happened next can be pieced together from law enforcement video and the incident report.


Rose initially didn’t stop as police pursued him. When he did, he saw officers with their guns drawn and took off again. At some point, he called 911 and told a dispatcher he feared the officers were “trying to kill” him. After pulling over a second time, he delayed getting out of the truck and did not immediately get on the ground as instructed.

He initially was charged with a felony for failing to comply with officers, but prosecutors dropped the case. Online court documents show Rose was charged Sept. 26 with a misdemeanor version of the offense and there is an active warrant for his arrest.

Neither Rose nor his attorney responded to repeated messages seeking comment.

It’s not clear why a K-9 unit was at the scene that day. Michael Gould, a former New York City police officer and founding member of the NYPD’s K-9 unit, said officers appeared to have control once they surrounded Rose with their guns drawn. And then there’s the image of Rose with his hands up.


“He was compliant and not a threat to anyone,” Gould said.

Rose required hospital care for the bites he suffered. Whether he sustained lasting injury is unclear.

The dog’s police handler, Officer Ryan Speakman, was fired, but the Ohio Patrolman’s Benevolent Association filed a grievance on his behalf arguing the officer was fired without just cause.

Circleville City Councilwoman Caryn Koch-Esterline said police have yet to account for what happened.

“I’m just waiting for all the information to come out,” she said in a brief interview with the AP three months after Rose’s arrest.

For those working to improve race relations in Ohio, the roadside attack was a reminder of all that is still left to do.

“If it were a white man and a dog was unleashed on that individual, what would that community be saying? I bet they would be up in arms,” said Nana Jones, president of the Columbus Chapter of the NAACP.
1698130198771.png
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
36,513
3,144
113
BLM activist lied about helping to free U.S. hostage held by Hamas: Family
Author of the article:Kevin Connor
Published Oct 23, 2023 • Last updated 1 day ago • 1 minute read
Family members of two U.S. hostages freed by Hamas accused BLM activist Shaun King of lying for claiming he had a role in securing their freedom.

Family members of two U.S. hostages freed by Hamas are accusing BLM activist Shaun King of lying for claiming he had a role in securing their freedom.


Judith and Natalie Raanan were visiting Israel from Illinois when Hamas attacked on Oct. 7.


Their relatives say King is lying for claiming on social media that he “worked frantically behind the scenes to help make this possible.”

The family says no.

“First and foremost, we make it clear that he is lying! Our family does not and did not have anything to do with him, neither directly nor indirectly. Not to him and not to anything he claims to represent,” they wrote in a statement obtained by TMZ.

Natalie’s father Uri told The Daily Beast that her brother, Ben, had spoke with King but distanced the family from the activist.

“We reached out to many people far and wide to bring Natalie and Judith to safety. We are not affiliated with Mr. King,” he said.

“Ben, my son was talking with him without anybody in the family knowing about it until today. Our family in Israel posted this statement denying we knew him, before we learned about Ben talking to him. We have nothing further to say.”

King fired back after being called a liar.

“I spoke directly and repeatedly with this family. I have a job, career, and family. I would be throwing everything away to make such a thing up,” King told The Daily Beast by email Saturday.

“Thankfully, I kept records of all of them.”
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
36,513
3,144
113
BLM activist lied about helping to free U.S. hostage held by Hamas: Family
Author of the article:Kevin Connor
Published Oct 23, 2023 • Last updated 1 day ago • 1 minute read
Family members of two U.S. hostages freed by Hamas accused BLM activist Shaun King of lying for claiming he had a role in securing their freedom.

Family members of two U.S. hostages freed by Hamas are accusing BLM activist Shaun King of lying for claiming he had a role in securing their freedom.


Judith and Natalie Raanan were visiting Israel from Illinois when Hamas attacked on Oct. 7.


Their relatives say King is lying for claiming on social media that he “worked frantically behind the scenes to help make this possible.”

The family says no.

“First and foremost, we make it clear that he is lying! Our family does not and did not have anything to do with him, neither directly nor indirectly. Not to him and not to anything he claims to represent,” they wrote in a statement obtained by TMZ.

Natalie’s father Uri told The Daily Beast that her brother, Ben, had spoke with King but distanced the family from the activist.

“We reached out to many people far and wide to bring Natalie and Judith to safety. We are not affiliated with Mr. King,” he said.

“Ben, my son was talking with him without anybody in the family knowing about it until today. Our family in Israel posted this statement denying we knew him, before we learned about Ben talking to him. We have nothing further to say.”

King fired back after being called a liar.

“I spoke directly and repeatedly with this family. I have a job, career, and family. I would be throwing everything away to make such a thing up,” King told The Daily Beast by email Saturday.

“Thankfully, I kept records of all of them.”
1698223123318.png
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
36,513
3,144
113
Robert E. Lee statue that prompted deadly protest in Virginia melted down
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Published Oct 27, 2023 • 1 minute read
The statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee that was a focal point of a deadly white nationalist protest in 2017 has been melted down and will be repurposed into new works of art. The Jefferson School African American Heritage Center, a Charlottesville-based Black history museum, said Thursday, Oct. 26, 2023, that the statue had been destroyed.
The statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee that was a focal point of a deadly white nationalist protest in 2017 has been melted down and will be repurposed into new works of art. The Jefferson School African American Heritage Center, a Charlottesville-based Black history museum, said Thursday, Oct. 26, 2023, that the statue had been destroyed.
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (AP) — A statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee that was a focal point of a deadly white nationalist protest in 2017 has been melted down and will be repurposed into new works of art.


The Jefferson School African American Heritage Center, a Charlottesville-based Black history museum, said Thursday that the statue had been destroyed.


The Charlottesville City Council voted in 2021 to donate the statue to the heritage center, after it proposed a Swords into Plowshares project that would melt the statue and repurpose it into “public art that expresses the City’s values of inclusivity and racial justice,” according to the proposal submitted to the city.

The statue was taken down in 2021 after years of debate and delay.

Protests over the plan to remove the statue morphed into the violent “Unite the Right” rally in 2017. It was during that rally that James Alex Fields Jr., an avowed Hitler admirer, intentionally drove his car into a crowd of counterprotesters, killing 32-year-old Heather Heyer and injuring 19 others. Fields is serving a life sentence.


Two groups that had sought to preserve the statue sued last year to try to block the city from donating it to the heritage center, but a judge tossed out their case.

At a news conference Thursday, heritage center officials said they now plan to solicit proposals on how to repurpose the statue. The center hopes to pick an artist next year and is conducting a $4 million fundraising campaign.

For now, the bronze from the statue has been molded into ingots stamped with the words “SWORDS INTO PLOWSHARES,” some of which were on display at the news conference.

“Our efforts have been not to remove history but bear witness to the truths about our racist pasts and our aspirations for a more equitable future,” said Andrea Douglas, director of the heritage center.
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
36,513
3,144
113
2 white boaters plead guilty to misdemeanours in Alabama riverfront brawl
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Published Oct 27, 2023 • 1 minute read
A brawl involving several men at Riverfront Park in Montgomery, Ala., was captured in a video shared on social media
A brawl involving several people at Riverfront Park in Montgomery, Ala., was captured in a video shared on social media. PHOTO BY TWITTER SCREENGRAB /BoreCure
MONTGOMERY, Ala. — Two white boaters charged in an Alabama riverfront brawl that drew nationwide attention pleaded guilty Friday to misdemeanour charges of harassment and assault.


The August riverfront melee in Montgomery drew national attention after white boaters were filmed hitting a Black riverboat co-captain and crew members rushing to his defence. Video of the fight was shared widely online, sparking countless memes and parodies.


Montgomery police said the brawl began when the white boaters refused to move their pontoon boat so the city-owned Harriott II riverboat could dock in its designated space. The boat’s co-captain said he was attacked after moving the pontoon boat a few feet to make way for the riverboat.

Four white boaters and one Black man, who was filmed hitting people with a folding chair, were charged with misdemeanour offences.

Two of the white boaters entered guilty pleas Friday, news outlets reported. A man pleaded guilty to charges of assaulting the Black riverboat co-captain and a white teen deckhand. The Montgomery Advertiser reported that he was given a four-month suspended sentence and will serve 32 days on weekends at a detention facility. A woman pleaded guilty to harassment and was ordered to complete anger management classes.

The three other defendants had their cases postponed until next month.
1698537448743.png
 
  • Like
Reactions: Taxslave2

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
36,513
3,144
113
Connecticut police officer under criminal investigation for using stun gun on suspect 3 times
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Dave Collins
Published Oct 30, 2023 • 2 minute read
This frame grab from Naugatuck, Conn., Police Department body camera video, with parts of the video blurred by the source, shows Naugatuck Officer Nicholas Kehoss pulling a stun gun trigger for about five seconds during one of multiple times as he yells at a shoplifting suspect, telling him to "shut up" and calling him an "idiot" during an arrest, Oct. 14, 2023. Naugatuck Police Chief C. Colin McAllister said Monday, Oct. 30, 2023, that state police were investigating Kehoss' use of force, and the department is doing an internal affairs investigation. (Naugatuck Police Department via AP)
This frame grab from Naugatuck, Conn., Police Department body camera video, with parts of the video blurred by the source, shows Naugatuck Officer Nicholas Kehoss pulling a stun gun trigger for about five seconds during one of multiple times as he yells at a shoplifting suspect, telling him to "shut up" and calling him an "idiot" during an arrest, Oct. 14, 2023. Naugatuck Police Chief C. Colin McAllister said Monday, Oct. 30, 2023, that state police were investigating Kehoss' use of force, and the department is doing an internal affairs investigation. (Naugatuck Police Department via AP) THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
A Connecticut police officer shocked a shoplifting suspect three times with a stun gun, including when the man was on the ground apologizing, according to police body camera video released Monday as officials announced criminal and internal affairs investigations.


Naugatuck Officer Nicholas Kehoss is seen on the video pulling the stun gun trigger for about five seconds during each of the three times. Kehoss also yells at the man, tells him to “shut up” and calls him an “idiot” during the arrest on Oct. 14, according to the video.


Police said the man, Jarell Day, 33, of Waterbury, was suspected of stealing $200 worth of beer in a robbery at a Naugatuck grocery store and later rammed police cruisers with a car as he fled from officers. Day crashed the car and fled on foot, but Kehoss caught up to him, according to the video.

Day was showing his hands when Kehoss ordered him to get on the ground and first fired the stun gun, the video shows. Day falls to the ground and Kehoss orders him to get on his stomach. Day rolls onto his side and tells the officer he is sorry, and Kehoss continues to yell at him to get onto his stomach and pulls the stun gun trigger a second time, the video shows.


Kehoss then orders Day to put his hands behind his back, according to the video. Day pleads, “No, no, please,” just before Kehoss pulls the trigger a third time, as the officer warns him that he is going to use the stun gun again, the video shows.

Neither Day nor officers were injured in the series of events.

Day was charged with robbery, attempted assault of a police officer, reckless driving and several other crimes. He was detained on bond Monday. Online court records show he is being represented by the public defender’s office, where no one answered the phone late Monday afternoon.

Naugatuck Police Chief C. Colin McAllister said Monday that state police were investigating Kehoss’s use of force, and the department is doing an internal affairs investigation.

“Early on in that process, we identified several concerns for this use of force,” McAllister said.

Kehoss did not immediately respond to emails seeking comment Monday. He is on paid leave pending the investigations.

McAllister said Kehoss has a disciplinary history with the department but did not elaborate. In 2021, Kehoss was found justified in shooting at a car three times when it hit his cruiser, which was pushed into him and knocked him down, as the driver tried to flee a stop. The bullets didn’t hit anyone.
police-officer-stun-gun[1].jpg
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
110,712
11,980
113
Low Earth Orbit

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
36,513
3,144
113
Officer charged in Elijah McClain’s death says he feared for his life after disputed gun grab
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Colleen Slevin
Published Nov 01, 2023 • 4 minute read

DENVER (AP) — A police officer charged with manslaughter and criminally negligent homicide in the 2019 death of Elijah McClain testified Wednesday that he put the 23-year-old Black man in a neck hold because he feared for his life after another officer said McClain grabbed for one of their guns.


Prosecutors have refuted that McClain ever tried to grab an officer’s gun, and it can’t be seen in body camera footage, which is shaky and dark before all the cameras fall off during the ensuing struggle. Lawyers for two other officers tried earlier in McClain’s death also raised the alleged gun grab as part of their defense.


“I was expecting to get shot, and I thought I’d never see my wife again,” Aurora officer Nathan Woodyard said on the stand, his voice shaking a bit, in his trial in McClain’s death. His death became a rallying cry at social justice protests following the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis.

Lawyers for Woodyard have argued he had to react to what he heard in the moment. He was the first of three officers who approached McClain after a 17-year-old 911 caller said McClain, who was wearing earbuds and listening to music, seemed “sketchy” and was waving his arms as he walked home on the night of Aug. 24, 2019.


The encounter quickly escalated. Prosecutors say Woodyard put his hands on McClain within eight seconds of getting out of his patrol car without introducing himself or explaining why he wanted to talk to McClain. McClain, seemingly caught off guard, tried to keep walking.

Woodyard, the first police officer to testify in his defense, said he and two other officers, Jason Rosenblatt and Randy Roedema, had McClain up against a wall when he heard McClain say, “I intend to take my power back” and then heard Roedema say, “He just grabbed your gun, dude.” Both statements can be heard on the visually unclear footage.

Roedema, who was convicted of criminally negligent homicide and third-degree assault in McClain’s death last month in a split verdict, later said McClain had reached for Rosenblatt’s gun. Rosenblatt was acquitted.


To gain control of McClain, Woodyard said he applied a carotid control hold by placing his arm around McClain’s neck, putting pressure on the sides to stop the flow of blood to McClain’s brain and render him briefly unconscious. The technique was allowed at the time but later banned in Colorado, one of over two dozen states that took steps to limit neck restraints after Floyd’s killing. McClain was then handcuffed.

Prosecutors said the hold, by cutting off oxygen to McClain’s brain, triggered a series of medical problems for him and that police officers and paramedics did nothing to help him, including making sure he could breathe. Instead, prosecutors said, police encouraged paramedics to give McClain an overdose of the sedative ketamine, which they claim only exacerbated his problems, ultimately killing him.


Paramedics Jeremy Cooper and Lt. Peter Cichuniec are scheduled to be prosecuted in the final trial in McClain’s death later this month. They have pleaded not guilty.

Woodyard testified that, soon after the neck hold, he heard McClain say he could not breathe, so he took off his mask. He believed McClain was able to breathe after that, laying on his side in what police call the recovery position, as opposed to facedown on his stomach.

Woodyard then left to talk to his supervisor who arrived on the scene, and he said he cried during the conversation. He said he was so shaken up by what happened that the supervisor suggested he take a break. He said he went to his car and cried some more and believed McClain would be safe with the other officers.



Prosecutors have portrayed Woodyard as abandoning McClain after using such serious force against him and suggested he was more concerned with administrative concerns, such as a possible investigation, rather than how McClain was doing. In cross-examining Woodyard, Senior Assistant Attorney General Jason Slothouber pointed out that the first thing he did after returning back on the scene was call Rosenblatt away to talk away from anyone’s body camera.

Later, Roedema, the only one of the three officers to restrain McClain throughout the encounter, told Rosenblatt and Woodyard how they were going to move McClain to a stretcher after the ketamine took effect. By then, McClain was no longer totally on his side, which would make it harder for him to breathe. Slothauber said Woodyard agreed to help and put on some gloves but did nothing to help McClain.

“You could have said, ‘Put this guy in the recovery position first’, but you didn’t,” Slothauber said.

Woodyard said he was not looking at McClain at the time.