Black Lives Matter-Ugliness of Racism.

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
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Regina, Saskatchewan
Well, luckily it was caught because they didn’t want us neighbours out on the street rubbernecking.

I can see where these cases of mistaken identity do happen though because of this. Mix something like that with the Castle law or doctrine and it becomes multiple obituaries.
 

Serryah

Senate Member
Dec 3, 2008
5,188
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New Brunswick
Ah yes, the Starlight Tours. Sucks in the winter & many have died and their circumstances buried out here on the Prairies. One of my cousins had a close call with a Starlight Tour in the winter outside of Winnipeg (The police took his coat but not his shoes), but luckily an elderly couple pick him up off the side of the highway fairly quickly.

Several years ago there was a drug house across the street from my place. Due to limitation on what the police can and cannot do, we contacted SCAN (safer communities and neighbourhoods) Who have different authorities and powers than the police force does, and different resources.

After a few weeks of observation, Some of us in the neighbouring houses were given a heads up to stay off the street because the raid was about to happen….. as they had a warrant to conduct the search of the drug house…. And as they were warning me over the phone…. It was me myself that caught the fact that they had my address and the drug house address reversed. Whoopsie. Close call.

I was that one phone call away from having my door kicked in and my dogs shot, and Lord only knows what else…. just because they reversed two addresses on the same street. At the time we had a Rottweiler & my Wolfish-Husky & neither would have lived through that clerical error.
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(Here they where just playing, as the Rotti hadn’t even bothered to get up. Believe it or not, it would have sounded even worse that it looked….& that’s without law enforcement kicking in my door.)
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Once my dogs where shot (& between the two of them they were almost 300 pounds of animals, so they would’ve been shot), I also probably wouldn’t have lived through that clerical error. It was one of those, “Wait. What? Can you please repeat those two addresses Sir?” moments that could have gone in a completely different direction if I was just a little less on the ball in that conversation.

I'm sure if anyone who doesn't know how dogs play came around my Borders or my husky and border, they'd be sure the dogs were murdering one another. They're not, they just play hard.

Lovely dogs

(yes, OT, sorrynotsorry, need a distraction from the end vigil tonight.
 
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Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
16,058
1,463
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
They obviously don't "confirm" addresses before raiding....not good!!
They had the right address’s but just in the wrong blanks 😉.

The drug house (at that time) was 1814, & our address was 1817. They just had the address is in the wrong places on the paperwork. It was caught before it was tragic but it opened my eyes as to how this sort of thing can happen.

This was many years ago and we’re all older, and the two dogs in the pictures have aged out with time. With time we’ve gone to smaller dogs that are more manageable as close to 300lbs as the ends of leashes are beyond what I should be doing at this point in time.
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spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
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Second time capsule found under Robert E. Lee monument in Virginia

Northam ordered the statue removed in September after condemning it as a racist relic of the Lost Cause

Author of the article:
Washington Post
Washington Post
Gregory S. Schneider
Publishing date:
Dec 28, 2021 • 18 hours ago • 2 minute read •
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Officials say the copper box found under the statue of Robert E. Lee appears to match the description of the original time capsule in historical news accounts.
Officials say the copper box found under the statue of Robert E. Lee appears to match the description of the original time capsule in historical news accounts. Photo by Office of the Governor of Virgin /Handout
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RICHMOND, Va. — Lesson learned: Dig deeper.
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Workers removing chunks of granite that had once supported this city’s Robert E. Lee monument finally found what appears to be an elusive 1887 time capsule shortly before noon on Monday. It was in the spot where experts had looked for it unsuccessfully in September, but farther down in the ground.

This is the second time a capsule was discovered under the monument — a small lead box opened last week contained mementos of several men who had designed the memorial.

The good news: The latest box was made of copper and is roughly the right dimensions to be the long-rumoured official time capsule, which is expected to contain some 60 items of Confederate memorabilia – including, possibly, a rare photo of President Abraham Lincoln in his casket.
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The bad news: It was found sitting in water.

“It’s not clear whether water is in the box or not,” said Grant Neely, a spokesman for Democratic Gov. Ralph Northam.

X-ray images released Monday evening by Northam’s office suggested that at least some items inside the box remain intact. Shapes that seemed to represent coins, buttons and Minié balls – or bullets – appear clearly outlined, along with at least one book.
A statue of Confederate general Robert E. Lee is lifted off its pedestal in Market Street Park in Charlottesville on July 10. MUST CREDIT: Washington Post photo by John McDonnell
A statue of Confederate general Robert E. Lee is lifted off its pedestal in Market Street Park in Charlottesville on July 10. MUST CREDIT: Washington Post photo by John McDonnell Photo by John McDonnell /The Washington Post

The box is slated to be opened 1 p.m. Tuesday in a conservation lab at the state Department of Historic Resources.

Northam, who ordered the statue removed in September after condemning it as a racist relic of the Lost Cause, was on a coronavirus-related call with the National Governors Association when word of the find arrived, Neely said.
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Chelsea Blake, a conservator with the Virginia Department of Historic Resources, attempts to open what is believed to be a time capsule found in Confederate General Robert E. Lee's monument, which was buried in 1887, in Richmond, Virginia, December 22, 2021.
1875 almanac, other books found in capsule from Robert E. Lee statue pedestal
A statue of Confederate general Robert E. Lee is lifted off its pedestal in Market Street Park in Charlottesville on July 10. MUST CREDIT: Washington Post photo by John McDonnell
Robert E. Lee statue will be melted down by African American history museum

The box was located beneath the northeast corner of the monument, which is where historians expected it to be, following Masonic tradition. Workers spent an entire day in September probing this spot but did not dig deeply enough into the granite rubble below the ground.

A smaller time capsule found inside the granite pedestal of the monument was opened last week to great fanfare, but it was apparent that it was not the official artifact that had been touted in historical news reports. The smaller box contained three books, at least one pamphlet, a photograph and a silver coin.

Most of the items appeared to relate to the men who designed or constructed the original monument. They were wet, but surprisingly intact, and are undergoing conservation so historians can better understand the tale they tell.

The bright copper box unearthed Monday was quickly whisked away to the historic resources department, where conservators X-rayed it to gauge its condition and formulate a plan for getting it open. If the contents have been soaking in water, any paper items might have been severely damaged.
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spaminator

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Oct 26, 2009
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Man freed 37 years after witness lied and took police bribe of drugs, sex

During Willie Stokes's murder trial, the witness recanted his testimony - which prosecutors argued was not credible given his own criminal history

Author of the article:
Washington Post
Washington Post
Paulina Villegas
Publishing date:
Jan 05, 2022 • 19 hours ago • 4 minute read •
15 Comments
Willie Stokes smiles after getting out of a state prison in Chester, Pa., on Tuesday, Jan. 4, 2022, after his 1984 murder conviction was overturned because of perjured witness testimony.
Willie Stokes smiles after getting out of a state prison in Chester, Pa., on Tuesday, Jan. 4, 2022, after his 1984 murder conviction was overturned because of perjured witness testimony. Photo by Matt Rourke /AP
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A Philadelphia man walked out of prison on Monday, 37 years after he was convicted of murdering a woman, an accusation he has vehemently denied, and after a federal court found prosecutors suppressed evidence of false testimony given by a key witness, the Philadelphia District Attorney’s Office said.
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Willie Stokes’s release comes after the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania vacated his murder conviction last week, concluding that the state violated Stokes’s constitutional rights by “withholding” crucial evidence about the false testimony of a key witness in the case, according to court documents.

The court ordered Stokes to be retried within 120 days or released, and the Philadelphia District Attorney’s Office acknowledged that the suppressed evidence crumbled the legal basis of the prosecution and “fatally undermined confidence” in Stokes’s conviction.

Stokes is expected to appear in court Jan. 27, when the district attorney’s office will probably inform its final decision to dismiss the matter or retry him, his lawyer Michael Diamondstein said in an interview Monday.
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“He took his first free breaths this afternoon after almost 40 years, and he is very happy and humbled,” Diamondstein said, and added that Stokes’s first wish after being released was to go “get a corned beef hoagie.”

On Monday, Philadelphia District Attorney Larry Krasner acknowledged that Stokes’s “remarkable” case was part of police and prosecutorial malpractices that were pervasive “during the so-called tough-on-crime 1980s and 1990s, and unfortunately persist in far too many jurisdictions today,” he said in a news release.

“Prosecutors have an obligation to seek justice, and to redefine prosecutorial success – not by ‘wins’ in the form of convictions, but by accuracy and fairness in resolving criminal investigations and prosecutions,” the statement added.
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Krasner noted that Stokes’s legal ordeal of nearly four decades – during which he filed numerous relief petitions and appeals to overturn his conviction, only to be rejected on procedural basis – underscored “the urgency of the criminal legal system seeking justice over finality.”
Willie Stokes, second right, and lawyer Michael Diamondstein, walk out of a prison in Chester, Pa., on Tuesday, Jan. 4, 2022, after Stokes’ 1984 murder conviction was overturned because of perjured witness testimony. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
Willie Stokes, second right, and lawyer Michael Diamondstein, walk out of a prison in Chester, Pa., on Tuesday, Jan. 4, 2022, after Stokes’ 1984 murder conviction was overturned because of perjured witness testimony. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

It was not until late November that the U.S. District Court in Pennsylvania agreed to hold a hearing. After reviewing the evidence, Judge Carol Sandra Moore Wells concluded that for 37 years prosecutors did not disclose to Stokes and his defence lawyers that Franklin Lee, the key witness who had accused him of murder, admitted that his testimony was a lie and that he had been convicted of perjury for it, and therefore Stokes was entitled to relief.
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In 1984, Lee was in prison facing murder and rape charges when he was approached by two homicide detectives who offered him “sex, drugs, and a deal,” in exchange for framing Stokes, according to his testimony in November.

“They said I wouldn’t do no more than two to five, the most seven years,” he said.

Lee added that to help persuade him to testify against Stokes, the detectives allowed his girlfriend to meet with him in private at police headquarters. Another time, he said, the detectives provided condoms and a sex worker, he said.

The two detectives, Lawrence Gerrard and Ernest Gilbert, have faced allegations of using similar “coercive methods” to obtain false testimonies from witnesses in other cases, court documents show.
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According to the Philadelphia Inquirer, the allegations first emerged more than 30 years ago, when a federal judge overturned the conviction of Arthur Lester, who said Gilbert and Gerrard used those tactics to coerce his confession. At least five other men are still in prison on convictions tainted by similar claims, the local newspaper reported.

During Stokes’s preliminary hearing in 1984, Lee claimed that Stokes was at his “house drinking, smoking, gambling,” and that in his basement, he admitted to killing Leslie Campbell in North Philadelphia, according to court documents.

There was no other evidence linking Stokes directly to the crime. A second surviving victim of the shooting attack testified that Stokes was not the shooter. Only one eyewitness said he saw Stokes at the scene holding a gun – but not shooting.
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But during Stokes’s murder trial, Lee surprisingly recanted his testimony – which prosecutors argued was not credible given his own criminal history.

Nevertheless, on Aug. 21, 1984, a jury convicted Stokes of first-degree murder and possession of an instrument of crime and sentenced him to life in prison without the possibility of parole. Soon after, they also charged Lee for perjury for his false hearing testimony. But that information was never disclosed to Stokes – who could have used it for his defense and appeals litigation.

It took decades for Stokes to discover that the Philadelphia District Attorney’s Office had prosecuted Lee for falsely accusing him.

During the November hearing, Lee, 62 testified that his initial statement given to police and at the preliminary hearing implicating Stokes in Campbell’s murder was false.
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“Mr. Lee, did Willie Stokes ever tell you that he killed Leslie Campbell?” Diamondstein, Stokes’s attorney, asked Lee at the November hearing.

“No,” he answered.

“Did Willie Stokes ever tell you he committed any murder?” the lawyer asked.

“No,” he replied.

After his testimony, Lee apologized to Stokes – who had been listening via teleconference from the State Correctional Institution in Chester.
Willie Stokes reacts while talking with members of the media upon leaving a state prison in Chester, Pa., on Tuesday, Jan. 4, 2022. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
Willie Stokes reacts while talking with members of the media upon leaving a state prison in Chester, Pa., on Tuesday, Jan. 4, 2022. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

“And I’d like to for the record, if I can, apologize to Mr. Stokes and the family for the problem I caused, sincerely,” he said.

Stokes’s lawyer advised him not to respond.

“Let the record reflect he’s crying,” Moore, the district court judge, pointed out. “I’m going to take his tears to indicate he’s accepting the apology.”

After the hearing, Moore recommended that Stokes’s conviction be overturned, finding “reasonable probability” that Stokes would have been acquitted without Lee’s testimony and concluded that the trial’s verdict was “therefore unreliable.”

“What happened here was an abomination,” Diamondstein said. “For too many years, law enforcement in Philadelphia have treated Black and Brown people like they are expendable and this case is a stark reminder it has to stop,” he added.

Stokes was released from the State Correctional Institution Monday afternoon.
 

spaminator

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Slain officer's sister sues Facebook, alleging it pushed extremist content

Steven Carrillo and his accomplice, Robert Alvin Justus Jr., connected through a boogaloo group

Author of the article:
Washington Post
Washington Post
Faiz Siddiqui
Publishing date:
Jan 06, 2022 • 14 hours ago • 4 minute read •
5 Comments
Janie Taylor sings beside a photo of Federal Protective Services Officer Dave Patrick Underwood on Friday, June 19, 2020, in Pinole, Calif.
Janie Taylor sings beside a photo of Federal Protective Services Officer Dave Patrick Underwood on Friday, June 19, 2020, in Pinole, Calif. Photo by Ben Margot /AP
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SAN FRANCISCO — The sister of a slain federal officer is suing Facebook’s parent company Meta, alleging it bears responsibility for her brother’s killing during racial justice protests in 2020.
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Facebook facilitated the hateful far-right “boogaloo” movement, leading an adherent to murder officer Dave Patrick Underwood, the lawsuit filed in a California Superior Court late Wednesday alleges.

The Homeland Security protective security officer was fatally shot in May 2020 when a van pulled up outside the Ronald V. Dellums Federal Building in Oakland and a gunman inside the vehicle sprayed bullets at Underwood and his partner, who was wounded in the shooting. Federal authorities identified the shooter as Steven Carrillo, an adherent of the “boogaloo boys,” an online extremist movement that has sought to capitalize on racial justice protests to usher in a race war. Underwood was killed as racial justice protests were underway nearby following the police murder of George Floyd.
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Now Underwood’s sister, Angela Underwood Jacobs, is accusing Facebook of “knowingly promoting extremist content” and connecting individuals who “planned to engage in acts of violence against federal law enforcement officers,” according to the suit.

The suit alleges wrongful death and a survival action for the pain and suffering Underwood endured before he died, citing alleged general negligence and negligent design by Facebook.

Facebook wasn’t immediately available to comment.
This May 29, 2020 surveillance photo provided by the FBI shows a van with the passenger side door open as someone fires at a security kiosk at the Ronald V. Dellums Federal Building in Oakland, Calif. (FBI via AP)
This May 29, 2020 surveillance photo provided by the FBI shows a van with the passenger side door open as someone fires at a security kiosk at the Ronald V. Dellums Federal Building in Oakland, Calif. (FBI via AP)

The suit takes aim at Facebook and other social media companies’ long-standing legal immunity for harmful content that is posted on their platforms. Technology companies are generally protected from such lawsuits by Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which says platforms are not publishers of the content posted on their sites, and thus aren’t responsible for the content that appears in such forums.
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But Section 230 is coming under fire on a variety of fronts. A series of bills that seek to erode the two decade-old law was proposed by lawmakers in both parties last year. Last month, a member of the Rohingya ethnic group based in the U.S. filed a wrongful-death lawsuit against Meta arguing that its platform fanned the flames of violence and led to a genocide in Myanmar in 2017. The lawsuit is seeking class action status to represent thousands of Rohingya refugees who have resettled in the U.S.

Lawyers for Underwood’s sister say Facebook should not be protected by Section 230.

Facebook said it took down hundreds of accounts and groups connected to the boogaloo movement in the wake of the violence in Oakland and an alleged plot to use explosives at a demonstration in Las Vegas, and designated the boogaloo group a “dangerous organization.” Facebook’s action came about a month after the shooting.
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Rather than simply allow information to be posted on the site, Facebook actively promoted inflammatory content and steered people toward it, the suit alleges.

“The algorithms are weighted to favor untrue, inflammatory, and divisive content that will grab and keep users’ attention,” the lawsuit says. “Furthermore, the recommendations are not based on Facebook user requests for recommendations – they are pushed onto users.”
This undated Department of Motor Vehicles photo provided by the FBI shows Robert Alvin Justus Jr., who has been charged with aiding and abetting the murder and attempted murder of two Federal Protective Services security officers in a shooting in Oakland, Calif., on May 29, 2020. (FBI via AP)
This undated Department of Motor Vehicles photo provided by the FBI shows Robert Alvin Justus Jr., who has been charged with aiding and abetting the murder and attempted murder of two Federal Protective Services security officers in a shooting in Oakland, Calif., on May 29, 2020. (FBI via AP)

That ultimately led the killer and his accomplice to meet over the platform, attorneys allege. They point to criminal complaints from the Justice Department that say Carrillo, then an active-duty Air Force staff sergeant, and his accomplice, Robert Alvin Justus Jr., connected through a boogaloo group on Facebook on May 28, 2020. They agreed to meet on May 29 and drive together to the protests, attorneys said.
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“Facebook bears responsibility for the murder of my brother,” Jacobs said in a news release. “Facebook must be held responsible for the harm it has caused not just my family, but so many others, by promoting extremist content and building extremist groups on its platform.” The firm Cohen Milstein Sellers & Toll is representing Jacobs in the wrongful death case.

The complaint also alleges that Facebook “Helped Build” the boogaloo community that ushered in their planning.

Facebook’s argument that it does not bear responsibility for harmful content was undercut by a trove of documents brought forth in October by whistleblower Francis Haugen. The documents showed that Facebook is deeply involved in researching the effects of harmful content and turning the dials of its algorithms to decide how to promote it to over 2.9 billion monthly users.
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The boogaloo movement arose from fringe social media channels such as 4chan before moving to mainstream platforms such as Facebook, Instagram and Twitter, where their followings ballooned as their views found a wider audience. Researchers found some groups had at times amassed hundreds of thousands of followers.

The group’s emergence led to a wider examination of the effects of social media on the rise of violent movements, with some making comparisons to foreign militant groups such as the Islamic State.

Carrillo is also accused in a separate killing of a sheriff’s deputy in Santa Cruz County. His attorney previously cautioned against a “rush to judgment” in the cases.