Black Lives Matter-Ugliness of Racism.

Twin_Moose

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spaminator

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CHAUDHRI: Whopping judgment in B.C. discrimination case rocks employment world
The decision includes the largest award for damages for injury to dignity in British Columbia totalling $176,000

Author of the article:Sunira Chaudhri
Publishing date:May 08, 2021 • 1 hour ago • 4 minute read • Join the conversation
Sunira Chaudhri is an employment and labour lawyer and partner at Levitt Sheikh Chaudhri Swann. She sheds light on some questions for employees during COVID-19.
Sunira Chaudhri is an employment and labour lawyer and partner at Levitt Sheikh Chaudhri Swann. She sheds light on some questions for employees during COVID-19. PHOTO BY SUPPLIED PHOTO /Levitt LLP
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$964,000 — that is the mammoth award received by Levan Francis, a correctional officer at North Fraser Pre-trial Centre, after the British Columbia Human Rights Tribunal found that he was targeted for being black.

This decision includes the largest award for damages for injury to dignity in British Columbia totalling $176,000.


Francis worked at North Fraser for over 10 years with no disciplinary record and was, by all accounts, a good employee with a good employment record. He was targeted because of his race. He was stereotyped by management as being slow and lazy. He was called a “lazy Black man” by a supervisor.

He experienced everyday racism while at North Fraser, being publicly denigrated as “because your Black” and heard other black-skinned officers being called racial slurs including being called the N word.

When management failed to take his complaints seriously, Francis filed a human rights complaint. He then left his job and continued his pursuit for damages at the B.C. tribunal, including damages for lost wages and damages for injury to dignity. He was wildly successful.

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MORE ON THIS TOPIC

Sunira Chaudhri is an employment and labour lawyer and partner at Levitt Sheikh Chaudhri Swann. She sheds light on some questions for employees during COVID-19.
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Sunira Chaudhri, a partner at Levitt LLP, is pictured in this undated handout photo.
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Francis’ case contains many lessons. Here are a few.

Francis reported many incidents to management who were either slow to investigate or did not investigate at all; a factor that weighed into Francis receiving larger damages.

The decision also points to the investigation being fraught with misconceptions and myths. The tribunal found Francis was viewed as “too sensitive” and that he was viewed as overreacting. He was also regarded as playing the “race card” to manipulate his coworkers to get what he wanted. This finding is critical. Even if an investigation is conducted perfectly, if it is clouded by misconception and bias damages will still flow. The wrong was not remedied.

Having counsel to guide your workplace through a complaint of harassment or discrimination is often worth the investment.

Many of the witnesses for North Fraser agreed that racial slurs and jokes were common in the workplace. When a workplace takes a casual approach to racial slurs it is extremely easy for a tribunal to make a finding that the environment is poisoned and dysfunctional for those employees targeted by the jokes.

The tribunal found North Fraser retaliated against Francis after he filed the human rights complaint while he was still employed. One supervisor actually issued a letter of reprimand to Francis following his filing the human rights complaint and misreported his behaviour to management. Few employees are aware that it is your right to file a human rights complaint while still employed. Your employer cannot punish you or terminate you for this reason. If they do, this will factor into damages against your employer, like in Francis’ case.

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The tribunal awarded Francis damages all the way to the date of his expected retirement (63 years of age) at $431,601; a pension loss award in the amount of $65,881 and for injury to dignity the tribunal noted “there is no cap on injury to dignity awards under the Code” and awarded Francis a precedent setting $176,000. All in, Francis walked away with $964,000.

Francis saw so much success because he reported the racism he experienced several times; even when management did little to change the working environment. He did not stop. He carried on unabated. He escalated each complaint; he exhausted every avenue. His reporting created the uncontroverted evidence he needed to succeed in his claims of discrimination. His employer could not deny he raised the issues of discrimination again and again.

If you are an employee that has been discriminated against perhaps this case will lead you to consider what you can do to seek damages, protect yourself and change the narrative in your workplace for good.


On to your questions from this week:

Q. I make a bonus every year and my employer just sent me an email that because the pandemic is rolling on, bonuses will not be paid out to employees. I know revenues are up. Is this allowed?

A. If your bonus is integral to your compensation and significant (more than 10% of your income) you could have a constructive dismissal claim. If you accept the letter; you may be seen as accepting a change to the terms of your employment and this can haunt you next year and years after too. Ask for your bonus. If you don’t get it, talk to a lawyer if the amount is significant.

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Q. I am a consultant with a large firm. I am an independent contractor officially but for all intents and purposes I am an employee. Now my firm wants to cut me off for three months to ensure the CRA doesn’t get wise. They have never done this before, but I have only been there for two years. I don’t want to lose the contract. What are my rights?

A. Regardless of what you may have agreed to with your firm, if your firm largely controls the way in which you work, you will be considered an employee in the eyes of the law. If your firm is cutting you off for three months, you may want to consider a breach of contract claim as there is no guarantee they will bring you back at the end of the three months or that they will not do this again at some point in the future. To understand the tax implications of your work arrangement, get tax advice.

Have an employment issue? Maybe I can help! Email me at schaudhri@lscslaw.com. Your question could be featured in a future article.
 
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spaminator

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Crown challenges off-duty Toronto cop's verdict in Dafonte Miller assault
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Paola Loriggio
Publishing date:May 13, 2021 • 13 hours ago • 3 minute read • Join the conversation
Michael Theriault arrive sat the Durham Region Courthouse in Oshawa on November 6, 2019.
Michael Theriault arrive sat the Durham Region Courthouse in Oshawa on November 6, 2019. PHOTO BY COLE BURSTON /THE CANADIAN PRESS
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An Ontario judge made errors in assessing issues related to self-defence and unlawful arrest in the case of an off-duty Toronto Police officer convicted of assaulting a young man, prosecutors argued before Ontario’s top court on Thursday.

The Crown is appealing Michael Theriault’s acquittal on charges of aggravated assault and obstruction of justice in the December 2016 beating of Dafonte Miller.


Theriault was instead convicted of the lesser charge of assault in connection with the incident, which left Miller, who was 19 at the time, with a ruptured eye and other injuries.

Theriault’s brother, Christian Theriault, was also charged but was cleared on all counts — a ruling the Crown is also challenging.

In her submissions, Crown attorney Susan Reid said the trial judge erred in his analysis of the early portion of the confrontation, during which the brothers chased Miller between two homes and Michael Theriault body-checked him against a fence.

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While Ontario Superior Court Justice Joseph Di Luca acknowledged Miller would not have known his pursuers were seeking to arrest him, the judge mistakenly focused only on Michael Theriault’s intentions in determining whether that series of events amounted to a reasonable use of force and a lawful attempt at arrest, Reid argued.

Since Michael Theriault did not identify himself as a police officer or verbally indicate he was trying to arrest Miller at the time, the attempt at arrest and the body check were not reasonable, she told the appeal panel, noting there were other options available.

“The lack of notice to Dafonte Miller is clear… and that alone would make the arrest unlawful,” she argued.

Di Luca further found that the body check may have led Miller to try to defend himself with a pipe, which means a proper assessment of the evidence was critical to the case, she said.

The error then affected the judge’s assessment of the brothers’ argument that they were acting in self-defence, she said.

Dafonte Miller speaks at a press conference after the verdict was handed down to the Theriault brothers in Durham region on June 26, 2020.
Dafonte Miller speaks at a press conference after the verdict was handed down to the Theriault brothers in Durham region on June 26, 2020. PHOTO BY SCREENGRAB /Toronto Sun
Lawyers representing Michael Theriault are also challenging the verdict. They argued Wednesday the assault conviction was unreasonable based on the evidence, and Theriault’s nine-month jail sentence is outside the normal range.

The Crown is only seeking a new trial if Theriault’s conviction appeal is successful. If the conviction is upheld, prosecutors say it would not be in the public interest to try the case again.

During trial, prosecutors alleged the Theriault brothers attacked Miller out of a desire for retribution after finding him and his friends breaking into their family truck in the early hours of Dec. 28, 2016.

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The Crown argued the pair beat Miller with a metal pipe during the confrontation.

Lawyers for the defence, however, alleged Miller was the one wielding the pipe, arguing their clients were acting in self-defence.


Di Luca found he couldn’t rule out the possibility that self-defence played a role in the early portion of the incident. It was during that portion of the encounter that Miller sustained the eye injury that warranted the aggravated assault charge, he said in his verdict.

The judge rejected the self-defence argument for the later portions of the incident, when he found Michael Theriault armed himself with a pipe and hit Miller in the head as the wounded and unarmed young man retreated.

As a result, Theriault was acquitted of aggravated assault but convicted of the lesser charge of assault.

Miller, who denied he was stealing from cars that night, told the court during sentencing that the incident permanently altered his life and his view of law enforcement.

The young man, who is Black, said it was his first time experiencing such an abuse of power at the hands of police.

The case spurred multiple protests against anti-Black racism and police discrimination.
 

spaminator

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Ohio city reaches $10 million settlement for killing of Black man by cop: Report
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Publishing date:May 14, 2021 • 19 hours ago • 1 minute read • Join the conversation
A protester holds a candle outside the home where Andre Maurice Hill, 47, was killed in Columbus, Ohio, December 24, 2020.
A protester holds a candle outside the home where Andre Maurice Hill, 47, was killed in Columbus, Ohio, December 24, 2020. PHOTO BY MEGAN JELINGER /REUTERS
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The city of Columbus, Ohio said on Friday that it reached a $10 million settlement with the family of Andre Hill, an unarmed Black man fatally shot in December by a police officer who was subsequently fired and indicted.

Hill, 47, was shot and killed by Adam Coy, a 44-year-old white man, on Dec. 22. Coy, a 19-year-veteran of the Columbus police force, was responding to a nuisance call about car noise.

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Columbus City Attorney Zach Klein called the statement the largest of its kind in the history of Ohio’s capital city.

“No amount of money will ever bring Andre Hill back to his family, but we believe this is an important and necessary step in the right direction,” Klein said in a statement.

“Now all those involved can begin to heal,” Hill’s family said in the same statement.


A series of police killings of Black people have highlighted longstanding accusations of racial injustice in U.S. law enforcement.

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Last summer, high-profile deaths in Minneapolis, Atlanta and Louisville and elsewhere triggered nationwide protests that pushed police reform to the top of the U.S. political agenda.

Coy, who was fired by the police force a week after the shooting, was indicted by a grand jury on one charge of murder, one charge of felonious assault and two counts of dereliction of duty on Feb. 3.

Coy pleaded not guilty to the charges two days later. WSYX, an ABC affiliate in Columbus, reported that he was released from jail on a $1 million bond on Feb. 9.

Coy told other police officers that he thought Hill was holding a gun and he feared for his life.

Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost said in February that Hill had a cellphone and no weapons were found at the scene.

In addition to the financial settlement, the City of Columbus will rename the gymnasium located inside a community center, the Andre Hill Gymnasium, Klein said.
 

spaminator

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Retired Black judge out for walk wrongfully detained by Vancouver cops
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Publishing date:May 15, 2021 • 23 hours ago • 1 minute read • 8 Comments
Judge Selwyn Romilly swears in Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson during a ceremony, Monday, Dec. 8, 2014.
Judge Selwyn Romilly swears in Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson during a ceremony, Monday, Dec. 8, 2014. PHOTO BY JONATHAN HAYWARD /THE CANADIAN PRESS
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VANCOUVER — The mayor of Vancouver says he is “appalled” that police officers wrongfully detained and handcuffed a retired British Columbia Supreme Court justice out for a walk on Friday morning.

Kennedy Stewart says in a statement he reached out to apologize to Justice Selwyn Romilly,the first Black person appointed to the court.

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Vancouver Police Sgt. Steve Addison says in a statement officers were dispatched around 9:15 a.m. following reports of a man kicking, punching and spitting at people along the seawall near English Bay.

He says officers patrolling the area noticed a man resembling the description of the suspect and “briefly detained him to investigate,” handcuffing him given the violent nature of the reported incidents.

Addison says the man was compliant and identified himself as a retired judge, and the handcuffs were “quickly removed.”


He says a patrol supervisor has since offered an apology.

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“The man was allowed to proceed when it became obvious that he was not the suspect and had done nothing wrong,” he says.

Addison says the suspect was described as a “dark-skinned man” around 40 to 50 years old — decades younger than Romilly, who finished law school at the University of British Columbia in 1966.

The correct suspect was taken to jail after officers found him around the same time in the same area, he says.


Stewart says he has contacted the police department’s chief and board members, and the board will review the incident.

“All of our institutions are based on colonialism and as such, are systemically racist,” including the city and police department, he says.
 

Twin_Moose

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ANDREW BROWN JR.

District Attorney says deputies' actions were 'justified' in shooting of Andrew Brown Jr.



Tuesday, May 18, 2021 10:31AM

In the article

According to Womble, the first shot fired by the deputies entered the front windshield of Brown's car. Several more shots are fired through the passenger and rear passenger door and window. Finally, as Brown drives off, more shots are fired through the back of the car.

Brown's car travels a short distance before crashing into a tree. The same deputies who shot him run to the crash site and remove his body from the vehicle.

"I find that the facts of this case clearly illustrate that the officers who used deadly force on Andrew Brown Jr. did so reasonably and only when a violent felon used a deadly weapon to place their lives in danger," Womble said.

Womble went on to say that the law does not require the danger to law enforcement to be actual. As long as the danger is apparent, it can justify the use of force--although Womble believes the deputies faced both apparent and actual danger during their interaction with Brown.

"The constitution does not require police to gamble with their lives in the face of a serious threat of harm," Womble said.

Investigators did not find a weapon in Brown's vehicle.

Womble said the official autopsy has not be finalized, but preliminary results from the medical examiner's office showed Brown had suffered two gunshot wounds: one to the right shoulder and one to the back of the head. The cause of death appears to be multiple gunshot wounds.

The autopsy also found a substance consistent with crystal meth was found in Brown's mouth at the time of his death.....More
 

Jinentonix

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The "W" word.

Being called white is derogatory, we're Caucasians.
Caucasian is an outdated, racist term mostly because not all Caucasians are White. The outdated term refers to people from Europe, as well as parts of Western Asia, South Asia and North Africa. East Indians are "Caucasians".
 
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HORROR: 18-Year-Old Man Abducts 4-Year-Old Boy From His Bed, Stabs Him to Death, Dumps His Body on Street​

 

spaminator

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Sheriff fires two South Carolina deputies involved in death of Black man
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Kanishka Singh
Publishing date:May 18, 2021 • 1 day ago • 1 minute read • Join the conversation
Police officers watch as protestors call for justice for Jamal Sutherland on May 17, 2021 outside of the Charleston County Judicial Center in Charleston, South Carolina.
Police officers watch as protestors call for justice for Jamal Sutherland on May 17, 2021 outside of the Charleston County Judicial Center in Charleston, South Carolina. PHOTO BY SEAN RAYFORD /Getty Images
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Two sheriff’s deputies in South Carolina were fired on Monday over their involvement in the case of the death of a Black man who had died after he was forcibly removed from his jail cell in North Charleston in January.

“Today, I made the decision to terminate the two detention deputies involved in this case,” Kristin Graziano, the Charleston County sheriff, said in a statement.

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“I must weigh the interest of public safety for the community against any incident that creates even the perception of an impairment to the operation of the Detention Center for the safety of all residents, staff and our Community,” the statement added https://bit.ly/3oqKYEb.

Footage released last week by the sheriff’s office showed the deputies pepper spraying and tasing the Black man, Jamal Sutherland, many times after he appeared to resist leaving his cell for a bail hearing, CNN reported.

The footage showed one of the deputies placing a knee on the back of Sutherland, and Sutherland saying, “I can’t breathe,” according to the New York Times. Sutherland was declared dead soon after.

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The incident drew comparisons to last year’s death of George Floyd, an African-American who died after a police officer knelt on his neck for more than eight minutes and whose death led to months of protests against racism and police brutality.

Shortly after the sheriff fired the deputies, about 100 protesters gathered in downtown Charleston on Monday to demand that the two also be charged with murder, The State reported.


The terminated officials were Sgt. Lindsay Fickett, employed since March 2011, and Detention Deputy Brian Houle, employed since July 2016, the Charleston County sheriff said on Monday.

Sutherland was in jail because of an incident at a behavioral health center on Jan. 4 wherein he was accused of “a misdemeanor offense of simple assault on a nurse staff member,” Sutherland family attorney Mark Peper told media.

The incident that eventually led to his death took place the next day at the Sheriff Al Cannon Detention Center in North Charleston.
 

spaminator

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Twitter finds its AI tends to crop out Black people, men from photos
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Paresh Dave
Publishing date:May 19, 2021 • 15 hours ago • 1 minute read • Join the conversation
In this file photo taken on Oct. 26, 2020, this photograph shows the logo of U.S. social network Twitter displayed on the screen of a smartphone and a tablet in Toulouse, southern France.
In this file photo taken on Oct. 26, 2020, this photograph shows the logo of U.S. social network Twitter displayed on the screen of a smartphone and a tablet in Toulouse, southern France. PHOTO BY LIONEL BONAVENTURE /AFP via Getty Images
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Twitter Inc’s image-cropping algorithm has a problematic bias toward excluding Black people and men, the company said in new research on Wednesday, adding that “how to crop an image is a decision best made by people.”

The study by three of its machine learning researchers was conducted after user criticism last year about image previews in posts excluding Black people’s faces.


It found an 8% difference from demographic parity in favour of women, and a 4% favour toward white individuals.

The paper cited several possible reasons, including issues with image backgrounds and eye colour, but said none were an excuse.

“Machine learning based cropping is fundamentally flawed because it removes user agency and restricts user’s expression of their own identity and values, instead imposing a normative gaze about which part of the image is considered the most interesting,” the researchers wrote.

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To counter the problem, Twitter recently started showing standard aspect ratio photos in full – without any crop – on its mobile apps and is trying to expand that effort.

The researchers also assessed whether crops favoured women’s bodies over heads, reflecting what is known as the “male gaze,” but found that does not appear to be the case.


The findings are another example of the disparate impact from artificial intelligence systems including demographic biases identified in facial recognition and text analysis, the paper said.

Work by researchers at Microsoft Corp and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2018 and a later U.S. government study found that facial analysis systems misidentify people of colour more often than white people.

Amazon Inc in 2018 scrapped an AI recruiting tool that showed bias against women.
 

spaminator

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Toronto cop who kicked Black teen might have used excessive force: Watchdog
OIPRD says evidence exists to suggest 'misconduct may have been committed'

Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Colin Perkel
Publishing date:May 20, 2021 • 18 hours ago • 3 minute read • Join the conversation
Toronto Police headquarters on College St. in Toronto.
Toronto Police headquarters on College St. in Toronto. PHOTO BY DAVE THOMAS /Toronto Sun
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A Toronto Police officer may now have to face a disciplinary hearing seven years after a Black teenager accused him of brutality, Ontario’s police oversight agency decided in a case that set off a bruising years-long legal battle.

In a new decision, the Office of the Independent Police Review Director found evidence exists to suggest Const. Chris Howes used excessive force during the incident in April 2014.

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“I find there are reasonable grounds disclosed during the original investigation to believe misconduct may have been committed,” Stephen Leach, the independent police review director, said.

The case arose when 19 officers, acting on a tip about a firearm, smashed in the front door of the Stanley family home. Howes rushed upstairs to where brothers Yasin and Faye Stanley were.

Legal documents show Howes kicked a prone Yasin Stanley — there’s a dispute over whether he was handcuffed — in the head at least once. Ultimately, police found no weapons and charged no one.

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In March 2015, then-review director Gerry McNeilly found evidence of “serious misconduct” against Howes. McNeilly referred the matter to Toronto’s police chief for a disciplinary hearing.

However, a senior police officer complained investigators had made a significant mistake regarding a statement from Howes, who had said he was reacting to a threat Yasin Stanley posed. McNeilly had mistakenly said Howes saw no threat.

Without telling the family, McNeilly reopened the investigation, then dismissed the allegations against the officer, prompting a court fight.

In its look at the case, Divisional Court rapped the watchdog for the secretive, back-channel chats with police. It ordered a fresh investigation, prompting the director to appeal.


The Court of Appeal then ruled McNeilly never had the power to review his initial misconduct finding. However, the appellate court also said new rules now granted the director that authority. The Supreme Court of Canada refused to intervene.

In his ruling this week, the current director said it was in the public interest to take another look. After doing so, Leach said, there were still grounds to uphold the initial finding of wrongdoing.

“Despite the error in the original report, there are reasonable grounds to believe misconduct occurred,” Leach said.

It’s now up to Toronto’s chief of police to decide whether the alleged misconduct was serious, in which case a tribunal hearing would be automatic. If the chief does not deem it serious, the two sides would have the chance to try to resolve the matter.

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Selwyn Pieters, the family’s lawyer, said on Thursday Howes should face a hearing.

“Despite the fact that seven years has elapsed, justice requires that a full public hearing takes place in this matter and be adjudicated on its merits, and a decision be rendered with respect to whether or not Officer Howes violated the code of conduct.”

Howes’ lawyer Lawrence Gridin called the latest director finding a “fresh absurdity.” His client, he said, had done nothing wrong and was considering his legal options.

“They’ve decided to ignore all the evidence from the second investigation, pretend it didn’t happen, and on that basis reinstate their first flawed determination that there is possible misconduct,” Gridin said. “The OIPRD has lost all credibility in this case.”

The case also sparked controversy in Hong Kong in 2019 after McNeilly was appointed to advise the territory’s Independent Police Complaints Council. McNeilly later admitted he had not told the council about the controversy over his handling of the Stanley complaint.
 

spaminator

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New footage released showing deadly arrest of Black man in Louisiana
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Rich Mckay
Publishing date:May 23, 2021 • 6 hours ago • 2 minute read • Join the conversation
Louisiana state troopers arrest Ronald Greene May 10, 2019 near Monroe, La., in this bodycam footage release May 22, 2021.
Louisiana state troopers arrest Ronald Greene May 10, 2019 near Monroe, La., in this bodycam footage release May 22, 2021. PHOTO BY LOUISIANA STATE POLICE VIA YOUTUBE /Handout via REUTERS
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More video of a fatal 2019 encounter of a Black man with police in Louisiana was released by authorities late Friday, and two state troopers were notified that they will be fired, in the fallout of a lethal traffic stop.

The newly-released bodycam footage shows a high-speed chase and Louisiana state troopers punching motorist Ronald Greene, 49, a Black man, while he was already in handcuffed.


He was also dragged across the ground by shackled feet, and stunned with tasers as he cried, “I’m scared.”

Greene, of West Monroe, Louisiana, led police on a high-speed chase after midnight of May 10, 2019, and crashed his car before being taken into custody, police said. He died in an ambulance on the way to a hospital, police said.

An autopsy showed that Greene had alcohol and cocaine in his system, suffered multiple injuries from the crash, as well as injuries from a physical struggle. The manner of death was not listed.

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Earlier this week, the case quickly became another national touchstone of alleged police abuse after the unauthorized release of police video by the Associated Press.

In response to that release, Colonel Lamar Davis, the superintendent of the Louisiana State Police held a late night press conference and said the department is releasing all the police bodycam video to add context to what has already been public.

“It’s unfortunate that the path to get here has taken so long,” he said. “But we cannot comment on any conduct of the officers involved, and we cannot offer specifics of the investigation.”

But Davis offered no explanation as to why the case has taken so long to become public. Calls to Davis’ office Saturday were not immediately returned.


The attorney for Davis’s family, Lee Merritt, said that he doesn’t understand why it’s taken two years for the family to get answers.

“The family says none of this lip-service matters until there is criminal accountability in the department,” Merritt said. “What happened here is a crime.”

Of the troopers involved, DaKota DeMoss has been notified that the department intends to fire him and he remains on leave pending another excessive use of force case, police said.

Master Trooper Chris Hollingsworth was also notified of the intent to dismiss him, and he died hours later in a fatal car crash, police said.

Another trooper, Kory York, served a 50-hour suspension and is back on duty.

The case is also the subject of a federal civil rights investigation.
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Danbones

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BLM activist Sasha Johnson shot in London​

Black Lives Matter activist Sasha Johnson is reportedly in critical condition after she was shot in the head.

According to The Guardian, Johnson’s affiliated group, Taking the Initiative party, announced the news on social media on Sunday. On the group’s official Facebook page, the party explained that the incident happened early in morning.


The statement said: “It is with great sadness that we inform you that our own Sasha Johnson has sustained a gunshot wound to her head. She is currently hospitalised and in critical condition. The incident happened in the early hours of this morning, following numerous death threats.”

According to reports made by the Metropolitan police, the 27-year-old woman was shot during a house party shortly before 3 a.m. However, the police have no reason to think it was a targeted attack at this stage in the investigation.
 
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Danbones

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EPIC BACKFIRE FOR BLM "JOURNALIST" WHO SOLD FOOTAGE TO CNN​



John Sullivan was paid tens of thousands of dollars by fake news media outlets for his footage of the Capitol riot.

Sullivan wore MAGA gear and claimed to be an independent reporter but he was actually a left-wing insurgence leader encouraging violence and telling people to “burn” the building.



 
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Danbones

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FEDERAL COURT RULES BIDEN POLICY'S ARE RACIST AGAINST WHITE PEOPLE, TULSI SLAMS ANTI-WHITE RACISM​


Federal judge says Biden restaurant fund discriminated against white male​



...and sexist too it looks like!
 
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DaSleeper

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Northern Ontario,

QUESTIONABLE SOURCE​

A questionable source exhibits one or more of the following: extreme bias, consistent promotion of propaganda/conspiracies, poor or no sourcing to credible information, a complete lack of transparency, and/or is fake news. Fake News is the deliberate attempt to publish hoaxes and/or disinformation for profit or influence (Learn More). Sources listed in the Questionable Category may be very untrustworthy and should be fact-checked on a per-article basis. Please note sources on this list are not considered fake news unless specifically written in the reasoning section for that source. See all Questionable sources.

  • Overall, we rate BitChute extreme right and Questionable based on the promotion of conspiracy theories, propaganda, hate speech, poor sourcing, fake news, and a lack of transparency. This source is not credible for accurate information and may be offensive to some (most).

Detailed Report​

Reasoning: Poor Sourcing, Conspiracy, Propaganda, Lack of Transparency, Fake News, Hate Speech
Bias Rating: EXTREME RIGHT
Factual Reporting: VERY LOW
Country: United Kingdom (33/180 Press Freedom)
Media Type: Website
Traffic/Popularity: High Traffic
MBFC Credibility Rating: LOW CREDIBILITY

History

Founded in 2017 by Ray Vahey, BitChute is an online video hosting platform that publishes far-right conspiracy theories and videos banned by Youtube for content violations. Some notable publishers on BitChute are conspiracy theorists Alex Jones and Lauren Southern. The website lacks transparency as they do not offer an about page, and anybody uploads videos. They claim to use a peer-to-peer network to prevent censorship.

View our profile on UK media and government.

Funded by / Ownership

Bit Chute Limited owns the website, with revenue derived through membership sales and donations. Virtually all payment processors such as Paypal have banned BitChute, and advertisers have rejected them due to offensive content.
 
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