What Is A Woman?

Serryah

Senate Member
Dec 3, 2008
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So if they trained in an field that is in need of workers, why could they not find a job?

Biggest reason? Experience. MANY jobs now require experience regardless of education to work in the position. Most up and comers/recent grads don't have the experience, so they don't get the jobs. That's at least the biggest reason I've read about.

Which brings out the "But how do we get experience?" and so far, that's never been answered and 'experience is a must/must have X years of experience' is STILL a requirement.
 

taxslave

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 25, 2008
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Vancouver Island
Biggest reason? Experience. MANY jobs now require experience regardless of education to work in the position. Most up and comers/recent grads don't have the experience, so they don't get the jobs. That's at least the biggest reason I've read about.

Which brings out the "But how do we get experience?" and so far, that's never been answered and 'experience is a must/must have X years of experience' is STILL a requirement.
Then obviously there is not a shortage of workers. I don’t know if you are old enough to have been working when key punch operators were in demand for early computers. That was a short lived career move that was being hyped at the time.
Anything trades is good for those that can use their hands. Business admin will help get in with government agencies and larger companies. the other thing is being prepared to relocate to find a career.
I know about the experience thing. Many companies think they are saving money by requiring experience, but that is not always the case.
something I have noticed, and I don’t know if it is the same in your area, but recent college grads have the erroneous impression that they should start at the top or at least middle management instead of entry level jobs because they have a degree.
 

Serryah

Senate Member
Dec 3, 2008
6,504
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New Brunswick
Then obviously there is not a shortage of workers.

There is a shortage of workers in that the people who can work, aren't, in the positions they're applying for.

I don’t know if you are old enough to have been working when key punch operators were in demand for early computers. That was a short lived career move that was being hyped at the time.

No, but I think I heard about it.

Anything trades is good for those that can use their hands.

Not everyone wants to do a trade, regardless of the push from people to go into them.

Business admin will help get in with government agencies and larger companies.

Which is where a lot of "Experience needed" jobs I've read about are happening.

the other thing is being prepared to relocate to find a career.

Depending on a person, relocation is good, or bad. If you've a young family, relocation is harder. Single? It's doable depending on circumstance. I'm single but relocating for me isn't going to happen (mortgage here, plus the costs to move elsewhere are too insane to make it feasible).

I know about the experience thing. Many companies think they are saving money by requiring experience, but that is not always the case.

That's true; when I got my job at the hospital, Experience wasn't needed at the time. Now I'm grandfathered in, thankfully, and am expanding my scope of knowledge for other departments. But then I've 20+ years to draw on.

something I have noticed, and I don’t know if it is the same in your area, but recent college grads have the erroneous impression that they should start at the top or at least middle management instead of entry level jobs because they have a degree.

Oh I agree that some idiots coming straight out deserve that; I've even read that while IN college they think they'll earn at least 75K to start and be fine once they graduate.

It's all about perspective and this belief from society that an education = amazing financial stability/lots of money. And an education means those top or middle management jobs. They get shocked that bottom is where they start out.

IMO, society and certain people created that belief in these 'monsters' and now they're paying for thinking it was a reality.
 
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taxslave

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 25, 2008
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You are right about trades. There are definitely people that are totally useless with their hands. And lots that simply are not interested. Also for many trades a B average is required now or you won’t be able to do the math and computer work. Mechanics and pipe fitters especially.
relocation isn’t that hard for young families unless they have a thing about being near family. We did it a couple of times.
 

Serryah

Senate Member
Dec 3, 2008
6,504
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New Brunswick
You are right about trades. There are definitely people that are totally useless with their hands. And lots that simply are not interested. Also for many trades a B average is required now or you won’t be able to do the math and computer work. Mechanics and pipe fitters especially.

I'd never be good in trades because I'm one of those 'maths challenged' types.

relocation isn’t that hard for young families unless they have a thing about being near family. We did it a couple of times.

It's not hard for young families? Are you KIDDING me? It's HELLISHLY hard. Even in the 80's it was hard; I was 7 when we moved from NB to NFLD and the next three years there was hell for me, my brother, my mom and my dad. And dad's was the only income we had at the time. Thank GODS he worked for a good company that helped him out the way they did so moving to and back from there wasn't as bad as it could have been. Not everyone has it so lucky.

My brother and his family have done a lot of relocating over the years and it was just him, his wife and their daughter, all to chase that 'better job' only to have it not be so great in the end.

Moving is definitely hard for families and not just for distance from family.
 

taxslave

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Nov 25, 2008
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We never found it hard. Didn’t change provinces though. But I did take a city girl right to PT. Hardy, which was a boom town at the time. She liked it for the first few years. She went home to have a kid delivered by the same dr that delivered all her sisters. Which was smart as the drs available didn’t want to do deliveries. We were there for 14 years. Then move to Campbell River, which is about 150 miles south so closer and easier to see her family.
 

Serryah

Senate Member
Dec 3, 2008
6,504
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New Brunswick
We never found it hard. Didn’t change provinces though. But I did take a city girl right to PT. Hardy, which was a boom town at the time. She liked it for the first few years. She went home to have a kid delivered by the same dr that delivered all her sisters. Which was smart as the drs available didn’t want to do deliveries. We were there for 14 years. Then move to Campbell River, which is about 150 miles south so closer and easier to see her family.

Most relocation now is province to province. Or maybe that just seems to be the theme around here.

My brother went from PEI to NB, to NS, back to NB in less than 10ish years and honestly I don't think it did that much for him. Thankfully he and his wife both work, but they're still not exactly that well off compared to where they could be.
 
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taxslave

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Nov 25, 2008
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Much of the moving here is to Alberta. And back. Turns out pulp mill workers have a skill set that fits with oil production. sit in a chair and push buttons when an alarm sounds. Some took their families, some commute. I know a few that went to the patch, made big money, looked after it and paid cash for a house back on the island and now don’t much care what they do for work because they don’t have bills. pretty sure there are lots from the east coast do the same thing.
I also know a few that discovered that big money= more drugs and came back in worse shape than when they left.
 

pgs

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Nov 29, 2008
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Who said anything about "French Lit" education?

These are people who took training to work in apparently 'demanding employment areas' or whatever you want to call it.

Or have you not read any stories about any of it and just assume the education someone is getting is 'worthless'?
Move out of New Brunswick and sell your expertise to the highest bidder .
 

pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
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Most relocation now is province to province. Or maybe that just seems to be the theme around here.

My brother went from PEI to NB, to NS, back to NB in less than 10ish years and honestly I don't think it did that much for him. Thankfully he and his wife both work, but they're still not exactly that well off compared to where they could be.
They went from have not to have not to have not and back to the original have not . Yikes shoot your foot off .
 

pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
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Biggest reason? Experience. MANY jobs now require experience regardless of education to work in the position. Most up and comers/recent grads don't have the experience, so they don't get the jobs. That's at least the biggest reason I've read about.

Which brings out the "But how do we get experience?" and so far, that's never been answered and 'experience is a must/must have X years of experience' is STILL a requirement.
I remember that prior to finding a job and gathering experience . Funny how that happens .
 
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Tecumsehsbones

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"When I war a lad, we lived in a paper sack in the ditch! Our father would kick us out of bed at two in the morning to go to the first of our three jobs without tea or breakfast! Then, after three ten-hour shifts, we'd get to bed six hours after we had to start the next day!"

The Old Yorkshiremen, Monty Python and the Flying Circus