WE really need to get rid of this guy

Taxslave2

House Member
Aug 13, 2022
2,743
1,662
113
It is question period , not answer period . It is a disgusting exhibition of contempt for voters and tax payers .
Perhaps that is what it should be renamed to. WE want answers. That is why we ask questions. Answer Period would place much more burden on the government to explain what they are doing.
 

Dixie Cup

Senate Member
Sep 16, 2006
5,717
3,596
113
Edmonton
I really don't know why we even bother with Question Period since no questions are ever answered. Why are we putting up with this B.S. They should be made to answer the questions rather than silly derogatory remarks - made by both sides incidentally.

Canadians should be disgusted at this but again, they seem not to care. Apathy will destroy this country, for sure!!
 
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Tecumsehsbones

Hall of Fame Member
Mar 18, 2013
55,517
7,048
113
Washington DC
I really don't know why we even bother with Question Period since no questions are ever answered. Why are we putting up with this B.S. They should be made to answer the questions rather than silly derogatory remarks - made by both sides incidentally.

Canadians should be disgusted at this but again, they seem not to care. Apathy will destroy this country, for sure!!
It's OK. We'll sweeten our offer. . . you can be SIX WHOLE STATES: Maritimia, Kay-bec, Ontario, Westernesse, BC, and Freezeyerassoff.

That's 12 Senate seats and a whole bunch of Congresscritters.
 

Taxslave2

House Member
Aug 13, 2022
2,743
1,662
113
It's OK. We'll sweeten our offer. . . you can be SIX WHOLE STATES: Maritimia, Kay-bec, Ontario, Westernesse, BC, and Freezeyerassoff.

That's 12 Senate seats and a whole bunch of Congresscritters.
Canada is much larger than the USA. Therefore, we would need at least 100 senators.
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
109,219
11,359
113
Low Earth Orbit
Recently, a Canadian politician stated that it feels like everything is broken in Canada right now. But is Canada broken? On behalf of the National Post, we surveyed Canadians from January 20 to 22, 2023 to learn more about their perceptions.

SOME OF THE KEY HIGHLIGHTS OF OUR IS CANADA BROKEN?

67% of Canadians agree with the statement made by a Canadian politician who stated that “it feels like everything is broken in this country right now”.

50% of Canadians are angry with the way Canada is being managed today.
68% of Canadians report that rising costs and inflation/interest rates are most important when it comes to the issues impacting them and their families.

37% of Canadians believe that the state of health care is the issue that governments and decision makers in their province are focused on the most.

SURVEY METHODOLOGY
A web survey was conducted among 1,554 Canadians, 18 years of age or older, via Leger’s online panel, LEO.

The data was collected from January 20 to 22, 2023.

As a non-probability online survey, a margin of error is technically not reported. If the data were collected through a probability sample, the margin of error would be ±2.5%, 19 times out of 20.

Using data from the 2021 census, the results were weighted according to age, gender and region within Canada, as well as by education and presence of children in the household in order to ensure a representative sample of the population.
 

The_Foxer

House Member
Aug 9, 2022
3,084
1,837
113
Recently, a Canadian politician stated that it feels like everything is broken in Canada right now. But is Canada broken? On behalf of the National Post, we surveyed Canadians from January 20 to 22, 2023 to learn more about their perceptions.

SOME OF THE KEY HIGHLIGHTS OF OUR IS CANADA BROKEN?

67% of Canadians agree with the statement made by a Canadian politician who stated that “it feels like everything is broken in this country right now”.

50% of Canadians are angry with the way Canada is being managed today.
68% of Canadians report that rising costs and inflation/interest rates are most important when it comes to the issues impacting them and their families.

37% of Canadians believe that the state of health care is the issue that governments and decision makers in their province are focused on the most.

SURVEY METHODOLOGY
A web survey was conducted among 1,554 Canadians, 18 years of age or older, via Leger’s online panel, LEO.

The data was collected from January 20 to 22, 2023.

As a non-probability online survey, a margin of error is technically not reported. If the data were collected through a probability sample, the margin of error would be ±2.5%, 19 times out of 20.

Using data from the 2021 census, the results were weighted according to age, gender and region within Canada, as well as by education and presence of children in the household in order to ensure a representative sample of the population.
Justin is out of touch. And it's one thing to lie when the people aren't facing a consequence, they can believe the lie then. But when they can't get a passport, can't use an airport, can't get medicine, can't afford frikkin' food... suddenly sunny ways and sweet words ain't gonna cut it

They say a conservative is a liberal who's been mugged. Justin and his policies have mugged canadians pretty bad. So the whole 'it feels broken' thing is really reaching home
 
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Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
23,069
7,964
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
As a refresher, in early November, a Global News report claimed Trudeau was warned LAST JANUARY about a Chinese-led funding network that included at least 11 candidates in the 2019 federal election. The report also alleged China placed agents in MP’s offices “in order to influence policy, seeking to co-opt and corrupt former Canadian officials to gain leverage in Ottawa, and mounting aggressive campaigns to punish Canadian politicians whom the People’s Republic of China (PRC) views as threats to its interests.”

Trudeau has since been under heavy pressure to name names — an ask crucial to protecting our democracy. We don’t know if any of the 11 candidates won their ridings. Or if they plan to run again. If no one faces consequences, what’s to deter even more brazen interference by bad actors?

“I do not have any information, nor have I been briefed on any federal candidates receiving any money from China,” Trudeau said at a Sunday press conference.

The second option is that Trudeau is lying. The third is a slightly softer option of door number two. That Trudeau, two weeks later, finally figured out how to splice and dice words so that he’s not technically lying, but can also avoid or delay sharing any useful information with Canadians.

He could be quibbling about what it means to be “briefed.” He could also be drawing a distinction between “federal candidates receiving any money from China” and what the Global report actually claimed, which was that 11 federal candidates were part of a shady financial network funded by China.

You may remember Trudeau played with wording to deny the Globe and Mail’s initial reporting on the SNC-Lavalin scandal. There’s also the ongoing discrepancy between Trudeau’s claims he didn’t know about the nature of allegations against former chief of defence staff Gen. Jonathan Vance and e-mails from his own staff characterizing them as “sexual misconduct.”
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Foreign Affairs Minister Melanie Joly hold a press conference following their participation in the Francophonie Summit in Djerba, Tunisia, on Nov. 20, 2022. (The Canadian Press/Sean Kilpatrick)
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Foreign Affairs Minister Melanie Joly hold a press conference following their participation in the Francophonie Summit in Djerba, Tunisia, on Nov. 20, 2022. (The Canadian Press/Sean Kilpatrick)

John Robson: Trudeau’s Denial of Knowledge of Alleged Chinese Funding to Candidates Raises Serious Concerns​


November 21, 2022
The latest twist in the saga of Chinese communist subversion of Canadian democracy has seen Prime Minister Justin Trudeau turn into Sgt. Schultz from “Hogan’s Heroes,” the dopey clod who knew and saw nothing.

Confronted by a reporter at the Francophonie Summit in Tunisia, he intoned “I do not have any information, nor have I been briefed on any federal candidates receiving any money from China.”

That boast of impenetrable incurious ignorance alone, whether true or false, renders the man unfit for office. If true, it means he culpably still hasn’t checked into the matter. And if false, he’s lying about something incriminating.

It is much more plausible that they offered him a briefing he rejected. (As Whittaker Chambers’ memoir “Witness” testifies President Roosevelt did over Stalinist subversion in the late 1930s.) Or that they did brief him, and he was so bored he forgot. Or he’s just plain lying now. But all are horribly unsatisfactory.

It looks a bit like “plausible deniability” whose apparent disavowal of all knowledge, if parsed carefully, says no such thing. And an explicit or tacit “You Canadians don’t need to see that information” is a typical official response, if outrageously inadequate on this file. But it doesn’t really matter because “I know nothing” is such a pathetic cover story that the mere fact that he thought it satisfactory, especially on security, should have us in paroxysms of alarm about his attitude.

Official Ottawa is as careless about PR as about intelligence. And why not, since they generally get away with feeble explanations? But what they’re trying to sell us now is that the prime minister is not just totally ignorant of a foreign subversion campaign, he’s so uninterested that even after the story broke he didn’t ask to be informed.

Whether we believe it or not, this cover story is carefully concocted to make him look ignorant and irresponsible. And if we’re led by someone whose attitude toward security is that fatuous, we should definitely take it seriously. Someone has to.

It's pretty obvious that he's lying. Which of course begs the question "why". Obviously a healthy number of those 'compromised' mps must be liberal and he doesn't want that to come out.
“Our intelligence and police services take very seriously the importance of fighting against foreign interference, including Chinese interference,” said Trudeau in French.
…but…but…the Chinese interference didn’t change the results in any “Significant” way…
“But I can assure you and all Canadians that the 2019 and 2021 elections were not subject to interference that changed the results in any significant way,” he added.

Poilievre noted the qualification in the prime minister’s response, accusing him of having “used words to obscure the answer.”

“Was there any interference of any kind?” he tried again.

Trudeau replied that interference in Canadian affairs by foreign powers “is an ongoing thing,” whether it be cyber interference or attempts to influence the media, and that it is something that intelligence agents and police officers work “very, very hard to counter.”

He, however, chose his words differently in English, and said that “Canadians can be reassured that the integrity of our elections was not compromised.” The rest at the above link.
National security officials drafted a warning for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his office more than a year before the 2019 federal election, alleging that Chinese agents were “assisting Canadian candidates running for political offices,” according to a Privy Council Office document reviewed by Global News.

Written by the office of National Security and Intelligence Advisor, Daniel Jean, at the request of Trudeau’s chief of staff — and arguably his most trusted aide — Katie Telford, the document called “Memorandum for the Prime Minister” was also provided to Privy Council Office clerk Michael Wernick, records show.

The 2017 PCO document also highlighted that subversion efforts had occurred before the 2019 election.

“Chinese foreign influenced espionage acts against elected officials and public servants in Canada is well documented,” it says.

Prepared for Trudeau 16 months before the 2019 election, the “Memorandum for the Prime Minister” raises questions about how seriously the PMO took the allegations and what steps Ottawa could have taken to address what national security officials later alleged was Chinese government interference in Canada’s 2019 and 2021 federal contests.

The June 2017 “Memorandum for the Prime Minister” arrived at an amicable time in Sino-Canadian relations.

Stephen Harper, with whom Beijing had a chilly relationship, had left office as prime minister, and Justin Trudeau’s more favourable attitude toward the regime — echoing his father’s trendsetting engagement with Mao’s China — brought new warmth to the rapport.

Four months after the 2019 election, another PCO memo was presented to senior Liberal officials.

Echoing the warnings from the 2017 memo, “PRC Foreign Interference: 2019 Elections” went into some detail about the alleged network’s financing methods during the contest.

After Global first reported these briefings last November, Trudeau and several ministers insisted that the 2019 elections were not compromised. “Our integrity held,” the prime minister told Global News in December.

One official who was not authorized to speak publicly called it “inexcusable” that Trudeau’s office has yet to move forward with new laws despite years of “interactive” dialogue with senior intelligence officials regarding China’s incursions into Canadian elections.

“The floodgates have been opened in the last five years. There has been ample evidence placed in front of the Liberal Party of Canada, and they have done essentially nothing.”
 
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Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
23,069
7,964
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
What, exactly, did this "Chinese interference" consist of?
Good question. I’m assuming (supplemented by years of reading) that the Chinese preferred a certain outcome in Federal (& provincial & municipal) elections in Canada that would govern their “interference” accordingly…whatever it is/was.

The government (Canadian) would in turn base their reaction it seems upon the goal of the Chinese chosen outcome as to how to react to the Chinese “interference.”

In the nature of openness & transparency, with our Gov’t being so forthright on this topic, it has been shared openly with the public (not) the answer to your question.

To attempt to try to further answer your question, it would have to be determined what outcome the Chinese government was seeking in Canadian elections, and then look for “interference” on their part that would influence the outcome towards their goals. Clear as a Gov’t press release.
 

Tecumsehsbones

Hall of Fame Member
Mar 18, 2013
55,517
7,048
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Washington DC
Good question. I’m assuming (supplemented by years of reading) that the Chinese preferred a certain outcome in Federal (& provincial & municipal) elections in Canada that would govern their “interference” accordingly…whatever it is/was.

The government (Canadian) would in turn base their reaction it seems upon the goal of the Chinese chosen outcome as to how to react to the Chinese “interference.”

In the nature of openness & transparency, with our Gov’t being so forthright on this topic, it has been shared openly with the public (not) the answer to your question.

To attempt to try to further answer your question, it would have to be determined what outcome the Chinese government was seeking in Canadian elections, and then look for “interference” on their part that would influence the outcome towards their goals. Clear as a Gov’t press release.
I'm just suspicious of vague terms like "Chinese interference." It reminds me of when the Bush the Lesser administration latched on the the "WMDs" term. Classically, "WMDs" are "NBC weapons:" nuclear, biological, & chemical. The Bush the Smaller bunch took the fact that Saddam Hussein had chemical weapons (which we knew because we had the receipts) and bootstrapped that into "WMDs," then used that to imply that Saddam Hussein had or was on the verge of developing nuclear weapons (Condoleeza Rice's famous quote about "We don't want the smoking gun to be a mushroom cloud").

That's the technique. Take a fairly innocuous occurrence (for example, the Chinese government directing some Chinese organizations, government or private, to attempt to influence Canadian opinion with internet posts), give it a nice, generic term like "Chinese interference," and then darkly hint that they're using spy satellites and balloons to alter the ballot tallies.

So, the way to cut through this is to demand to know exactly what "the Chinese" did, and ask "Is that illegal?" If so, publicize it, warn the public about it, and prosecute it to the extent possible. If not, the government has better things to do. Like govern.
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
23,069
7,964
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
I hear you. I too, would like to know.

The concern, however, is that it’s a judgment call whether foreign interference in a Canadian federal election rises to the level of calling into question the overall results and the public has no way of knowing how that was determined, since we don’t know what the incidents of foreign interference were.
 
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