Ukraine Flight 752 "Crash" killing 176 innocent people

Why did flight 752 crash?

  • Tragic accident

    Votes: 2 13.3%
  • Shot down by Iranian missles

    Votes: 12 80.0%
  • Unsure

    Votes: 1 6.7%

  • Total voters
    15
  • Poll closed .

Twin_Moose

Hall of Fame Member
Apr 17, 2017
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Twin Moose Creek
Family of University of Alberta student killed in Flight 752 missile attack flees to Edmonton

The family of an Iranian graduate student at the University of Alberta who died when Iran shot down a commercial jet in January is now living in Edmonton, alleging they were forced to flee threats from Iranian authorities.
The parents, younger brother, and aunt of Amir Hossein Saeedinia arrived in Edmonton eight days ago and will seek refugee status, said Reza Akbari of the Iranian Heritage Society of Edmonton, which helped the family.
Akbari said the family had been pressured by Iran's Revolutionary Guard Corps not to speak publicly about the government's handling of the botched missile attack.
The attack killed 57 Canadians, 31 of which were from Alberta, including Saeedinia, who was pursuing a doctorate at the University of Alberta's Centre of Design of Advance Materials.
But Akbari said Saeedinia's mother, Leila Latifi, refused.
"She held her ground very tight and she was saying, 'I'm not going to be quiet,'" he said, adding later that the family wants accountability, "and obviously we know the government of Iran is not going to provide that and is just escalating pressure on them."
Akbari said the Iranian community in Edmonton first learned of the family's plight when they were preparing memorial services for those killed in the missile attack.
Community members raised money to help the family come to Canada and then reached out to the office of Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland.
Canada expedited visas
Akbari said that within 24 hours the Canadian government issued six-month visitors' visas for the family. The family first fled to Turkey, where they stayed for about 20 days, before travelling on to Edmonton.
Community members rented the family a place to stay and are helping the family — who speak no English — adapt to their new life in Canada after leaving everything behind.
"But I can tell you this family is very strong for only one reason; they want justice," Akbari said. The family wants to take Iran's Supreme Leader, Ali Khamenei, to the International Court.
"He [Khamenei] is in charge of the entire military operation in Iran," Akbari said.
Two missiles struck Ukraine International Airlines flight 752 shortly after it took off from Tehran airport on Jan. 8. Iran denied responsibility for several days until videos surfaced that provided irrefutable proof that the Revolutionary Guard had fired missiles at the plane.
The regime then claimed its military mistakenly believed the Boeing 737 was a warplane. All 176 people on board were killed.
The missile attack occurred while Iran was on high alert after the United States, in a drone strike, killed Qassem Sulaimani, the leader of a special branch of the Revolutionary Guard. The killing of Sulaimani by the U.S. was retaliation for the killing of an American translator in Iraq by Iranian-backed militias.
Canada has joined with other countries to insist on an independent investigation of the incident, and for reparations to be paid by Iran to the families of the victims.
Akbari said the family can't go back to Iran.
"They won't be safe," he said. "They would be detained and who knows what would happen to them.
 

spilledthebeer

Executive Branch Member
Jan 26, 2017
9,296
2
36
You would think a massive explosion might cause some sort of damage.




Oh yes!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Massive explosions ARE BAD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Just LOOK at the disorder of your thought process!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Poor hemrHOID.............................


your head is NOT NEARLY AS WELL ENGINEERED as a aircraft black box!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Was it a hammer or an anvil that fell on you????????????????????


Admit it now.....................................


when you were younger you endured one of those "Wiley Coyote" moments!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

spilledthebeer

Executive Branch Member
Jan 26, 2017
9,296
2
36
A self destruct charge?




IS IT NOT TERRIBLY SAD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


That a civilian airliner should suffer such a DISTRESSING ACCIDENT...............................


right after a regime full of MURDEROUS SWINE CHOSE...........................


to teach the DESPISED GODLESS INFIDELS A LESSON..............................


using the latest in military weapons purchased from the Russian Dictatorship!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


How such an UNFORTUNATE EVENT could possibly occur....................................


IS TRULY ONLY A MYSTERY TO STUPID LIE-berals!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

Twin_Moose

Hall of Fame Member
Apr 17, 2017
17,258
3,352
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Twin Moose Creek
Ukraine: it's too early to blame human error for downing of passenger plane in Iran

KYIV (Reuters) - Ukraine's foreign minister said on Tuesday it was soon to blame human error for the shooting down of a Ukrainian passenger airliner near Tehran in January, challenging the findings of Iran's Civil Aviation Organisation (CAO).

The CAO said in an interim report that the plane was accidentally downed, killing 176 people on board, because of a misalignment of a radar system and lack of communication between the air defence operator and his commanders.

But Ukrainian Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba told an online briefing that many questions remained unanswered.

"I want to clearly emphasise: it is early to say that the plane was shot down as a result of human error, as the Iranian side claims," he said. "We have many questions, and we need a large number of authoritative, unbiased, objective answers about what happened."

Iran's Revolutionary Guards shot down the Ukraine International Airlines flight with a ground-to-air missile on Jan. 8 shortly after the plane took off from Tehran. Iran later called it a "disastrous mistake" by forces who were on high alert during a confrontation with the United States.

Tehran said last month said it would send the black box flight recorders from the downed airliner to France for analysis and that experts from the United States, Canada, France, Britain and Ukraine would take part in the decoding.

Kuleba said an Iranian delegation was due to arrive in Kiev later this month to discuss compensation. Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy said in February Kiev was not satisfied with the size of compensation Iran had offered.
 

Hoid

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 15, 2017
20,408
2
36
France successfully downed the contents of the black box - a little over 6 months after the incident.

Although I believe the Ukraine had already been given access that took far too long because of politics. There are some things that should be above politics and international flight safety is one of them.

Iran and everyone else needs to be brought into the circle of nations in this regard.
 

Durry

House Member
May 18, 2010
4,648
211
63
Canada
How many of the Iranian students studying here in science and engineering were going back to Iran to work on Iran’s nuclear program?

I note that none of the students were here to learn about democracy.
 

Danbones

Hall of Fame Member
Sep 23, 2015
24,508
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iaea doesn't think so

5. On 5 January 2020, Iran announced that its nuclear programme would no longer be “subject to any restrictions in the operational sphere” and stated that it would continue to cooperate with the Agency “as in the past”. 6 In this reporting period, the Agency has not observed any change in the level of cooperation by Iran in relation to Agency verification and monitoring activities under the JCPOA


...but facts eh?
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
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Ottawa rejects Iran report that blames shootdown of plane on 'human error'
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Christopher Reynolds
Publishing date:Mar 17, 2021 • 14 hours ago • 4 minute read • comment bubbleJoin the conversation
This handout photograph taken and released on Jan. 11, 2020, by The National Security and Defence Council of Ukraine, shows people standing and analyzing the fragments and remains of the Ukraine International Airlines plane Boeing 737-800 that crashed outside the Iranian capital Tehran on Jan. 8, 2020.
This handout photograph taken and released on Jan. 11, 2020, by The National Security and Defence Council of Ukraine, shows people standing and analyzing the fragments and remains of the Ukraine International Airlines plane Boeing 737-800 that crashed outside the Iranian capital Tehran on Jan. 8, 2020. PHOTO BY STR /National Security and Defense Co
Article content
OTTAWA — Iran’s civil aviation authority is blaming “human error” as the reason why a passenger jet was shot down by the Iranian military in January 2020, outlining its findings in a report the Canadian government rejected outrightas insufficient.

Iran’s Revolutionary Guardfired two missiles at Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752 shortly after it took off from Tehran on Jan. 8 last year, when “the aircraft was misidentified as a hostile target by an air defence unit,” says the agency’s final report into the crash.


Foreign Affairs Minister Marc Garneau and Transport Minister Omar Alghabra largely dismissed the 145-page document, which was posted to the website of Iran’s Civil Aviation Organization.

“The report makes no attempt to answer critical questions about what truly happened. It appears incomplete and has no hard facts or evidence,” the ministers said in a statement Wednesday.

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“We remain deeply concerned about the lack of convincing information and evidence.”

All 176 people on board the jetliner were killed, including 55 Canadian citizens, 30 permanent residents and dozens of others bound for Canada. The Tehran-Kyiv route has been an inexpensive first leg of a trip from Iran to Canada.

The federalgovernment continuesto call for a “comprehensive and transparent” investigation conducted according to international standards.

Under international civil aviation law, the Iranian government led the probe.


The report, which Canada’s Transportation Safety Board says it will comment on at a news conference scheduled for Thursday, echoes what the Iranian military said last year: human error caused the tragedy — an explanation found wanting by multiple countries that lost citizens.

Iran initially denied responsibility for the crash, but three days later said the Kyiv-bound Boeing 737-800 was shot down by accident after being mistaken for a missile amid heightened tensions with the United States. The admission came after video footage on social media appeared to show at least one missile striking the jet.

The disaster unfolded hoursafter Iran launched missiles into Iraq at two American military bases in retaliation for the U.S. having killed top Iranian general Qassem Soleimani near the Baghdad airport by order of then-U.S. president Donald Trump.

A group representing families of the victims — 138 had ties to Canada — strongly rejected the report findings.

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“(They) appear to be mere fabrications and a continuation of a lie,” the Association of Families of Flight PS752 Victims said in a release.

“The contents published in this report, as with their previous reports, contain countless inconsistencies and are grossly inadequate to justify Iran’s claims about the causes of the downing.”

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A woman cries in front of a huge screen bearing portraits of late crew members and passengers of Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752, which crashed in Iran a year before, during a commemorative ceremony on Jan. 8, 2021 at the site of a future memorial on the Dnipro river bank in Ukraine's capital Kiev.
Canadians mark first anniversary of downing of Flight PS752 in Iran
A handout photo provided by the Iranian news agency IRNA on Jan. 8, 2020, shows rescue teams working at the scene of a Ukrainian airliner that crashed shortly after take-off near Imam Khomeini airport in the Iranian capital Tehran.
Goodale rejects Iran’s offer to compensate Canadian victims of downed Ukraine plane

Ralph Goodale, the former Liberal public safety minister who was named Canada’s special adviser on the response to the crash, called the report unconvincing, “shambolic” and “insulting” to loved ones.

It lacks hard evidence to back up its claims and overlooks Iran’s “very reckless decision” to keep most of its airspace open to commercial traffic despite having just launched a missile strike across the border, he said.

“They also failed to alert their own air-defence missile operators about the identities of those innocent aircraft that were taking off. It’s just a litany of failure that sounds very much like wanton disregard for human life,” Goodale said in an interview.

Without an honest assessment of what went wrong and how it’s been fixed, Iranian airspace remains as potentially dangerous today as it was in January 2020, he added.

Britain, Ukraine, Afghanistan and Sweden also lost citizens when the plane was destroyed, and the countries formed a coalition with Canada to deal with Iran.

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A series of mistakes led to the fatal missile launch, the Iranian investigation team found.

An incorrect read on the plane’s flight direction due to “human error” caused an operator to perceive the aircraft as flying northeast toward Tehran at a low altitude, rather than flying west away from the main airport, which it was.

The operator tried to alert the command centre to the apparent threat, “but the message was never relayed,” the report states.

“Without receiving a go-ahead or response from the command centre, he came to identify the target as a hostile one and fired missile (sic) at the aircraft against the procedure planned.”

The first warhead exploded near the aircraft, hurling more than 2,500 pieces of shrapnel toward it at nearly 6,500 km/h — more than five times the speed of sound — damaging the plane and aircraft systems but leaving its structural integrity intact, according to the report.

“(T)he three cockpit crew members were all still alive. They appeared to have sustained no physical injuries.”

The second missile “likely” did affect the aircraft, but the plane plummeted to the ground regardless, crashing near the airport and exploding on impact six minutes after takeoff and three minutes after the first missile detonated, the report said.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has urged Iran to provide justice and transparency to the victims and their families.

In December, Iran pledged to pay $150,000 to each family that lost someone on the plane, but Goodale rejected the offer at the time.

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He said Iran doesn’t have the right to offer compensation to victims’ families unilaterally and that the final amount will be subject to negotiations between Iran and Canada and the four other countries whose citizens were killed on the plane.

“There’s more to reparations than just compensation. They will pursue a formal explanation of the facts,” Goodale said of negotiators.

Trudeau has promised Canada will offer a pathway to permanent residency for some family members, while those already here could apply to stay if needed. He also designated Jan. 8 as the National Day of Remembrance for Victims of Air Disasters.

The federal government also said scholarships would be set up in memory of the victims.

— With files from Maan Alhmidi
 

spaminator

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Oct 26, 2009
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Iran's report on shootdown of Flight 752 doesn't explain why it happened: TSB
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Jordan Press and Maan Alhmidi
Publishing date:Mar 18, 2021 • 1 day ago • 4 minute read • comment bubble6 Comments
Red Crescent workers check plastic bags at the site where the Ukraine International Airlines plane crashed after take-off from Iran's Imam Khomeini airport, on the outskirts of Tehran, Iran Jan. 8, 2020.
Red Crescent workers check plastic bags at the site where the Ukraine International Airlines plane crashed after take-off from Iran's Imam Khomeini airport, on the outskirts of Tehran, Iran Jan. 8, 2020. PHOTO BY NAZANIN TABATABAEE / WEST ASIA NEWS AGENCY /REUTERS
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OTTAWA — Canada’s Transportation Safety Board says Iranian officials failed to provide evidence that a passenger jet was shot down by mistake early last year, leaving key questions unanswered as Iran’s military effectively investigated itself.

It is unusual for the TSB to comment on the results of a report into an incident that took place in another country.


Under international civil aviation rules, the country where the incident took place is in charge of the investigation and addresses questions and concerns from affected nations in its final report.

But board chair Kath Fox said the “unprecedented situation” where the Iranian military effectively oversaw the investigation compelled the agency to speak out Thursday, noting that dozens of its comments and questions went unanswered in the final report.

The final report from Iran’s civil aviation body blamed “human error” as the reason why the Revolutionary Guard shot down a jetliner minutes after it took off from Tehran on Jan. 8 last year.

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All 176 people on board were killed, including 55 Canadian citizens, 30 permanent residents and dozens of others bound for Canada.

The report didn’t provide a detailed explanation or evidence about the underlying factors that caused Iran’s military to fire two surface-to-air missiles at Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752.

Iranian officials only explained what happened, provided what Fox called a plausible explanation for the shootdown, and left unanswered questions about what actions Iran’s military has taken to prevent a repeat occurrence.


The TSB’s concerns added to a mountain of international criticisms about the report released Wednesday.

Domestically, the federal Liberals described the report as devoid of “hard facts or evidence.” Ralph Goodale, the former Liberal public safety minister who was named Canada’s special adviser on the response to the crash, called the report “shambolic” and “insulting” to loved ones.

Goodale previously recommended the government strike a special group of investigators to look into the incident. A report from that group, which is acting separately from the TSB, is expected in the coming weeks.

The investigation report from Iran’s Civil Aviation Organization said a military operator fired two surface-to-air missiles after misidentifying the Boeing 737-800 as a “hostile target” and despite not getting a green light from superiors, as per procedure.

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Iranian officials leading the investigation decided they couldn’t probe the military’s actions under international investigation rules, a determination Fox said the TSB rejects.


“This investigation needed to look into the military activities that led to their stated cause — which was a misalignment, a misidentification, a miscommunication, a breakdown in procedures — to support that scenario, which they haven’t done,” Fox said.

“It would be very challenging for any state to investigate its own military activities in such a case, but I think it’s important for public confidence in the findings of the report to delve into those areas so that there can be confidence that if it was, in fact, an error, it won’t happen again.”

Iran initially denied responsibility but three days later said the Kyiv-bound aircraft was accidentally shot down after being mistaken for a missile amid heightened tensions with the United States. The admission came after video footage on social media appeared to show at least one missile striking the jet.

The disaster unfolded hours after Iran launched missiles into Iraq at two American military bases in retaliation for the U.S. having killed top Iranian general Qassem Soleimani near the Baghdad airport by order of then-U.S. president Donald Trump.

The report only partially explains why the airspace remained open and active for commercial airlines after the military action, Fox said. She also said the TSB, Canada’s air-safety investigator, does not believe the risk to commercial airlines operating in Iran’s airspace has been reduced.

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MORE ON THIS TOPIC

This handout photograph taken and released on Jan. 11, 2020, by The National Security and Defence Council of Ukraine, shows people standing and analyzing the fragments and remains of the Ukraine International Airlines plane Boeing 737-800 that crashed outside the Iranian capital Tehran on Jan. 8, 2020.
Ottawa rejects Iran report that blames shootdown of plane on ‘human error’
A handout photo provided by the Iranian news agency IRNA on Jan. 8, 2020, shows rescue teams working at the scene of a Ukrainian airliner that crashed shortly after take-off near Imam Khomeini airport in the Iranian capital Tehran.
Goodale rejects Iran’s offer to compensate Canadian victims of downed Ukraine plane

Kourosh Doustshenas, whose partner Forough Khadem was one of victims, said the final report was disappointing but not unsurprising. He said the investigation team wasn’t capable of producing an independent report, calling the final product “full of lies and misrepresentations.”

“I can’t really move on,” he said in an interview. “This report, it doesn’t help (in) any way or shape to tell the truth, or provide any kind of justification of what happened.”

He, like other families, wants to know what the federal government plans to do.

The families, in a statement, called on the Liberal government to push Iran to release more information from the investigation, including through economic sanctions on the Revolutionary Guard, and then consider taking the regime to the International Court of Justice if talks stretch beyond three months.

“We want to know what is the roadmap going forward,” Doustshenas said.

— With files from Christopher Reynolds
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
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Ontario court finds Iran liable for downed Ukrainian plane
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Publishing date:May 20, 2021 • 13 hours ago • 1 minute read • Join the conversation
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TORONTO — A court in the Canadian province of Ontario ruled on Thursday that Iran owes damages to families who sued after Iran’s Revolutionary Guards shot down a Ukrainian passenger plane in January 2020, soon after it took off from Tehran.

Ontario’s Superior Court of Justice found that “on a balance of probabilities” the missile attack was an intentional act of terrorism, based mainly on written evidence provided by lawyers representing families of some of the victims.


Iran did not defend itself in court. Calls and an email to the office in Washington that handles consular affairs for Iranians in Canada were not immediately answered.

As many as 138 of the 176 people killed on the flight had ties to Canada.

The judge did not rule on damages, which will be dealt with at a future hearing. When it was first filed, the lawsuit sought at least C$1.5 billion in compensation.

The Iranian government has said the jet’s downing was a “disastrous mistake” by forces who were on high alert during a confrontation with the United States.

Foreign states are not typically within the jurisdiction of Canadian courts, but a 2012 Canadian law limited that immunity for countries listed as “foreign state supporters of terrorism,” including Iran.


Canada does not have formal diplomatic relations with Iran, and claiming damages will likely be lengthy and complex, but it has been done before.

The lawsuit names Iran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, top commanders of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, and others.

Mark Arnold, one of the lawyers for the plaintiffs, has represented clients in other lawsuits against Iran, including a 2017 decision that led to the seizure of some Iranian assets in Canada.