Ukraine Flight 752 "Crash" killing 176 innocent people

Why did flight 752 crash?

  • Tragic accident

    Votes: 2 13.3%
  • Shot down by Iranian missles

    Votes: 12 80.0%
  • Unsure

    Votes: 1 6.7%

  • Total voters
    15
  • Poll closed .

spaminator

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Iran rejects Canadian court ruling that Tehran liable for downed Ukrainian plane
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Publishing date:May 21, 2021 • 2 hours ago • 1 minute read • Join the conversation
A police officer stands guard as debris is seen from an Ukrainian plane which crashed in Shahedshahr, southwest of the capital Tehran, Iran, January 8, 2020.
A police officer stands guard as debris is seen from an Ukrainian plane which crashed in Shahedshahr, southwest of the capital Tehran, Iran, January 8, 2020. PHOTO BY EBRAHIM NOROOZI /THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
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Iran said on Friday an Ontario court has no jurisdiction to rule on a claim for damages over the crash of a Ukrainian passenger plane downed by Iran’s Revolutionary Guards last year.

The Superior Court of Justice ruled on Thursday that Iran owes damages to families who sued over the crash, which killed 176 people, 138 of them with ties to Canada.


“Everyone knows that the Canadian court has no jurisdiction over this air crash” since it occurred outside Canada, Iran’s Foreign Ministry spokesman Saeed Khatibzadeh told reporters. His comments were carried by the ministry’s Telegram channel.

Also, he said, the ruling “is not based on eyewitness evidence.”

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Ontario court finds Iran liable for downed Ukrainian plane
This handout photograph taken and released on Jan. 11, 2020, by The National Security and Defence Council of Ukraine, shows people standing and analyzing the fragments and remains of the Ukraine International Airlines plane Boeing 737-800 that crashed outside the Iranian capital Tehran on Jan. 8, 2020.
Trudeau, O'Toole demand accountability as Iranian officials indicted for PS752 crash

The Iranian government has said the jet’s downing in January 2020, soon after it took off from Tehran, was a “disastrous mistake” by forces who were on high alert during a confrontation with the United States.

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Foreign states are not typically within the jurisdiction of Canadian courts, but a 2012 Canadian law limited that immunity for countries listed as “foreign state supporters of terrorism,” including Iran.


The judge did not rule on damages, which will be dealt with at a future hearing. When it was first filed, the lawsuit sought at least $1.2 billion in compensation.

The lawsuit names Iran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, top commanders of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, and others.

Canada does not have formal diplomatic relations with Iran, and claiming damages will likely be lengthy and complex, but it has been done before.
 

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Human Rights Watch says families of Flight 752 victims harassed, intimidated by Iran
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Stephanie Taylor
Publishing date:May 27, 2021 • 6 hours ago • 2 minute read • Join the conversation
In this Jan. 8, 2020, file photo, rescue workers search the scene where an Ukrainian plane was shot down in Shahedshahr, southwest of Tehran, Iran.
In this Jan. 8, 2020, file photo, rescue workers search the scene where an Ukrainian plane was shot down in Shahedshahr, southwest of Tehran, Iran. PHOTO BY EBRAHIM NOROOZI /AP Photo
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OTTAWA — A human rights group says in a new report that Iran has harassed families of passengers killed aboard Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752.

Human Rights Watch says from last fall until January, it spoke with 31 family members of victims and “people with direct knowledge” of how Iranian authorities treated relatives.


In all, 176 people were killed when an Iranian surface-to-air missile shot down a passenger jet destined for Kyiv minutes after takeoff near Tehran on Jan. 8, 2020.

Among the dead were 55 Canadians and 30 permanent residents.

Human Rights Watch says those it spoke with say Iranian security agencies have mistreated victims’ families through arbitrary detainment, interrogation and intimidation.

It reports 16 people said security officials threatened them not to speak with foreign media or followed relatives and friends who attended memorials.


“Family members said that in several instances, the authorities interfered with burial and memorial services, pressuring families to accept the government’s ‘martyrdom’ status for their loved ones, and published photos and videos without the permission of the families at services,” it read.

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One person taken into custody was also tortured, the report says, detailing how in at least three cases family members were told they would face consequences if they didn’t remove critical social media posts against the government.

In a statement issued late Thursday, Global Affairs Canada welcomed the report’s “efforts to investigate and publicize the completely unacceptable harassment of PS752 families by the Iranian regime.”

“The RCMP is aware of reports relating to victim experiencing threats, harassment and intimidation,” a spokesman wrote.

“The RCMP wants to ensure that anyone who is concerned for their own immediate safety should contact their local police.”


The downing of the flight happened after the United States killed a top Iranian military official, heightening tensions in the region.

Iran initially denied responsibility for the plane crash, but later said it was shot down after being misidentified as a hostile target and done in “human error.”

Canada is preparing to negotiate with Iran over repatriations.

Ontario’s Superior Court ruled last week that the downing of the jet was an act of terrorism, paving the way for relatives to seek compensation from Iran.
 

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Iran tampered with victims' electronic devices in aftermath of Ukrainian Airlines Flight 752 downing: Report

OTTAWA — A new report is accusing Iranian authorities of tampering with the electronic devices and misidentifying the remains of some of the passengers killed on Ukrainian Airlines Flight 752.

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The findings are among new revelations contained in a lengthy report by the Association of the Families of Flight PS752 Victims that examines the Jan. 8, 2020 shootdown of the commercial airliner by the Iranian military.


All 176 people on board the Kyiv-bound airliner were killed when the Boeing 737-800 was shot down by a surface-to-air missile fired by Iran’s Revolutionary Guard minutes after taking off from the Tehran airport.

Those killed included 55 Canadian citizens, 30 permanent residents and dozens of others bound for Canada, as well as nationals of Britain, Ukraine, Afghanistan and Sweden.

Iran initially lied about the cause of the tragedy in the days following but ultimately admitted to shooting down the plane.

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The new report says several mobile phones and tablets of dead passengers showed signs of tampering in what could have been an attempt to cover up the cause of the crash.

“One likely explanation is that these electronics may have been bulldozed over in an attempt to destroy any potential evidence that victims recorded in the last minutes of their lives,” the report says.

The families enlisted a retired Toronto police homicide detective, Mark Mendelson, whose consulting firm examined a laptop and cellphones returned to the families. He concluded the devices “showed evidence of human manipulation” and showed no evidence of burn patterns or other signs of damage consistent with the plane slamming into the ground.

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“The fact that these memory/data components are missing is not consistent with damage caused by a sudden and hard impact. Moreover, the fact that screws were removed and covers pried open strongly suggests that concerted efforts were made to extract these components, rendering a review of data impossible.”

The report also says Iranian authorities botched the identification of some of the victims, a revelation that will only increase the pain and suffering of their loved ones.

“The association has obtained evidence that DNA testing on some victims’ bodies did not match their stated identification by Iranian authorities,” the report says.

“This neglectfulness on the part of the government of Iran has had serious psychological consequences for families, some of whom did not receive the whole bodies of their loved ones and were given the remains of other victims instead.”

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The report accused Iranian authorities of a “systematic coverup” of the cause of the crash.


Foreign Affairs Minister Melanie Joly joined counterparts from Sweden, Ukraine and the United Kingdom, collectively known as the International Co-ordination and Response Group for the victims of Flight PS752, in criticizing Iran’s refusal to meet this week to negotiate reparations.

“We remind the Islamic Republic of Iran that it must fulfil its international legal responsibility to make full reparations to the group of countries and thus reiterate our call to negotiate in good faith and to do so before the end of the year,” the group said in a joint statement Wednesday.

“Should Iran continue to avoid negotiating with the group, the co-ordination group will have no choice but to seriously consider other actions and measures to resolve this matter within the framework of international law.”

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The airliner was shot down during a period of high tension after Iran launched missile attacks on bases in Iraq where American troops were stationed. Iran said it was retaliating for a U.S. drone strike that killed Iran’s top military commander days earlier.

The report says Iran’s claim that it closed its western skies as a preventive measure was false because flight tracking data showed other passenger planes in the air before the tragedy.

The report also says a leaked audio file of a meeting between Iran’s former foreign minister with other top officials, including senior military figures, shows an effort “to publicly propagate the narrative that Flight PS752 had crashed due to a technical failure.”

Wednesday’s report builds on previous criticism that Canadian authorities have heaped on the Iranian regime, including the fact it dragged its heels for months before releasing the flight recorders.

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In March, the Iranian Civil Aviation Organization blamed “human error” for the incident, saying an operator fired two surface-to-air missiles after misidentifying the Boeing 737-800 as a “hostile target” and despite not getting a green light from superiors, per procedure.

The Canadian government rejected the Iranian report, calling it as “incomplete” and devoid of “hard facts or evidence.”

“The families of the victims of Flight PS752 are resolute in finding the truth and seeking justice,” writes Hamed Esmaeilion, the president of the victims’ families association in Wednesday’s report.

In the report, he reiterates the view of the association that Canada and the other countries that lost nationals on the plane must use “all available means, including the International Court of Justice (ICJ) and the International Criminal Court (ICC), to bring the perpetrators of this crime to justice.”

Speaking at a news conference Wednesday to release the report, Esmaeilion said the association demands an impartial, international investigation.

“There are still numerous unanswered questions. We need to get the truth to get the closure. I cannot describe what we have been through over the last two years,” he said.
 
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spaminator

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Ontario court awards more than $107M to families over deadly Flight 752 shootdown

Author of the article:
Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Publishing date:
Jan 03, 2022 • 12 hours ago • 1 minute read •
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A woman cries in front of a huge screen bearing portraits of late crew members and passengers of Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752, which crashed in Iran a year before, during a commemorative ceremony on January 8, 2021 at the site of a future memorial on the Dnipro river bank in Ukraine's capital Kiev.
A woman cries in front of a huge screen bearing portraits of late crew members and passengers of Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752, which crashed in Iran a year before, during a commemorative ceremony on January 8, 2021 at the site of a future memorial on the Dnipro river bank in Ukraine's capital Kiev. Photo by GENYA SAVILOV /AFP via Getty Images
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OTTAWA — An Ontario court has awarded more than $107 million to families of six victims of the Iranian military’s downing of a passenger jet two years ago.
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The decision made public today follows a May ruling that the missile strikes amounted to an intentional act of terrorism, paving the way for relatives of those killed to seek compensation from Iran.

In the 2021 decision, Ontario Superior Court Justice Edward Belobaba found on a balance of probabilities that the missiles that shot down Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752 on Jan. 8, 2020, were fired deliberately at a time when there was no armed conflict in the area.

As a result, he found it constituted an act of terrorism that would invalidate Iran’s immunity against civil litigation.

While the State Immunity Act protects foreign states from legal claims, the Justice for Victims of Terrorism Act provides an exception in cases where the losses are caused by terrorist activity.

More than 100 of the 176 people killed in the plane crash had ties to Canada, including 55 Canadian citizens and 30 permanent residents.
 

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Canada, others seek formal arbitration with Iran over downed jet
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Ismail Shakil
Published Dec 28, 2022 • 2 minute read

OTTAWA — Canada, Britain, Sweden and Ukraine on Wednesday called on Tehran to settle a dispute over accountability and reparations for the downing of an airliner by Iranian forces nearly 3 years ago through arbitration under the rules of the 1971 Montreal Convention.


All four countries as well as Iran are signatories of the convention, an international treaty which requires states to prevent and punish offences against civil aviation. If the countries cannot settle their dispute within six months, Iran can be taken to the International Court of Justice.


Most of the 176 people killed when Iran shot down the Ukrainian jet near Tehran in January 2020 were citizens from those four countries, which created a coordination group that seeks to hold Iran to account.

“We … have taken concrete action today to ensure that our efforts to hold Iran to account for the unlawful downing of Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752 can progress to the dispute settlement phase,” the countries said in a joint statement.


“In particular, we have requested that Iran submits to binding arbitration of the dispute … pursuant to Article 14 of the Convention for the Suppression of Unlawful Acts against the Safety of Civil Aviation of 1971,” they said.

Direct talks with Iran broke down earlier this year, when the coordination group said its attempts to resolve the matter through negotiations had been “futile.”

Iran says Revolutionary Guards accidentally shot down the Boeing 737 jet and blamed a misaligned radar and an error by the air defence operator at a time when tensions were high between Tehran and Washington.

At the time, Iran was on edge about possible attacks after it fired missiles at Iraqi bases housing U.S. forces in retaliation for the killing days before of its most powerful military commander, Qassem Soleimani, in a U.S. missile strike at Baghdad airport.

Ottawa has said a special Canadian forensic team charged with examining all available information about the incident found no evidence that the downing of the plane had been premeditated.
 

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Canada, allies demand Iran submit to binding arbitration for downing of Flight PS752
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Published Dec 28, 2022 • 1 minute read

OTTAWA — Canada is among four countries calling on Iran to agree to binding arbitration for shooting down Flight PS752 nearly three years ago.


The group of nations — which also includes Britain, Sweden and Ukraine — made the request today through a United Nations convention designed to protect commercial aircraft from attack.


Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps shot down the Ukrainian Airlines flight just minutes after takeoff on Jan. 8, 2020, killing all 176 people on board.

The passengers included 55 Canadian citizens and 30 permanent residents, along with others with ties to Canada.

The call for binding arbitration follows years of unsuccessful negotiations with the Iranian government in terms of reparations and holding those responsible to account.

If Iran does not agree to the demand for binding arbitration within six months, the case can be referred to the International Court of Justice.
 

spaminator

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After three years, mourners of Flight PS752 victims still seek justice
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Dylan Robertson
Published Jan 07, 2023 • 5 minute read

OTTAWA — Grieving relatives will mark three years since the Iranian military shot down Flight PS752 on Sunday by holding rallies across the country and pushing Ottawa to take a tougher stance against Iran.


“It has been a long journey for the families, but we still have hope,” said Hamed Esmaeilion, head of the Association of Families of Flight PS752 Victims.


Esmaeilion’s wife and daughter were among the 176 people killed when Iranian officials shot down a Ukraine International Airlines jetliner in January 2020 shortly after its take-off from Tehran.


Most of the passengers were bound for Canada via Ukraine, including 55 Canadian citizens and 30 permanent residents.

In an interview, Esmaeilion thanked Canadians for their support over the past three years, as families fight for accountability and compensation.

“That was very heartwarming for every one of us, that we see people care.”

On Dec. 28, Canada joined peer countries in starting the process to send the Flight PS752 case to the International Court of Justice and attempt to force Iran to compensate victims’ families.


Ottawa had previously held off, arguing that allowing enough time for negotiations with Iran over reparations would bolster the case if it needed to be heard by a tribunal.

But with negotiations at a standstill, Canada helped issue a formal notice last month asking Iran to submit to binding arbitration in the case. The move kicks off a six-month period after which one of the plaintiff countries can take Iran to the International Court of Justice.

The Iranian regime has had shifting responses to the incident, at one point portraying it was an accident and then later claiming the plane had been moving suspiciously, which contradicts the findings of an investigation by the International Civil Aviation Organization.


While it’s unclear whether the court would successfully compel Iran to provide compensation, the case would likely prompt more investigation and shed light on new information about what happened.

“This step was long overdue. But having said that, it’s a good step to take,” said Esmaeilion, who said he is buoyed by an Ontario court ruling in 2021 that said the downing was an intentional act of terrorism — not an accident.

“This senseless, merciless crime that they committed took all of them from us.”

He commended Ottawa for putting economic sanctions on 62 Iranian individuals and 25 entities last fall. Yet he says about one-third of the 30 people his group has identified as being involved in downing Flight PS752 have not been sanctioned.


He added that Iranian-Canadians are aware that former regime officials and their families still move about freely in the country, from Vancouver to Halifax.

Ottawa has promised to stand up a new sanctions bureau, allocating $76 million to better track those barred from dealings in Canada. But it’s unclear when new staff will be hired and trained.

Esmaeilion said he’s frustrated by bureaucrats who suggest that sanctions are less a way to punish specific individuals and more a way to nudge regimes into behaving better. He argued Iran will not improve the way it treats people unless it faces clear pushback, and noted that the regime has been responsible for killing Canadians in other cases.

Iranian officials “have no place in a free country like Canada,” he said.


In the fall, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau faced sustained pressure from the Iranian diaspora and the Opposition Conservatives to list the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps as a terrorist organization.

The force, which is part of Iran’s military, shot down Flight PS752 and is responsible for much of the regime’s violent meddling abroad.

It has also taken part in the ongoing crackdown on human-rights activists following the September death of 22-year-old Mahsa Amini in police custody, following her arrest by morality police for allegedly wearing her hijab improperly.

In October, Trudeau’s government barred more than 10,000 former IRGC members from entering Canada, but it has remained hesitant to list the entire corps as a terrorist organization because it could punish those conscripted into the force for non-combat roles.


Immigration lawyers have said that some Iranian-born Canadians already face difficulty boarding aircraft and entering the United States due to past IRGC membership.

Conservative MPs and activists like Esmaeilion have argued that Canada could find a legislative way to avoid punishing those drafted against their will.

They also point to reports from British media this month that suggest London is getting ready to list the force as a terrorist group, citing unnamed government sources. The reporting did not lay out a timeline or details on any provisions related to conscripts.

Kaveh Shahrooz, a senior fellow with the Macdonald-Laurier Institute, said Ottawa seems to be dragging its feet.

“Over the past three years, I think it’s been very slow movement,” said Shahrooz, who used to advise Global Affairs Canada on human-rights treaties.


He said the same was true on efforts to seek justice in the PS752 case while negotiations with Tehran were underway.

“There has been no criminal investigation by the RCMP,” Shahrooz said. “There’s no reason these things can’t move on parallel tracks.”

On Friday, Trudeau met with family members of Flight PS752 victims, alongside Foreign Affairs Minister Melanie Joly, Transport Minister Omar Alghabra and Canada’s High Commissioner in the United Kingdom, Ralph Goodale, who helped co-ordinate the government’s response.

“When I spoke with the families of the victims today, I promised them we’ll continue to be relentless in our fight for truth, justice and accountability,” Trudeau said on Twitter.

Some Liberal MPs have also started symbolically sponsoring Iranian dissidents, following a similar trend by European parliamentarians.


The MPs are committing to raising the cases of specific dissidents incarcerated in Iran to pressure Tehran not to execute them and, as one letter signed by MPs puts it, “remind the Iranian regime that we are watching, that the world is watching.”

Shahrooz has criticized the Liberals for what he sees as prioritizing symbolic gestures over policy changes. But he said this initiative can have a tangible impact for people at risk of death.

“Over the years, in speaking with former political prisoners, they’ve always told me that … when foreign officials speak about them, the situation tends to improve remarkably,” he said.

“Interrogators back off; often times, torture stops and the regime remembers these prisoners have defenders outside.”
 

spaminator

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Jail terms for those behind downing of Ukraine flight
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Published Apr 16, 2023 • 1 minute read

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates — An Iranian court has sentenced an air defence commander allegedly responsible for the deadly downing of a passenger plane amid Iran-U.S. tensions several years ago, a state news agency reported Sunday.


Iran’s paramilitary Revolutionary Guard mistakenly shot down the Ukraine International Airlines flight in January 2020. The missile strike killed all 176 people on board and came as Tehran and Washington teetered on the brink of war.


The Guards commander who officials purport ordered the strike was sentenced to 13 years in prison, the official judiciary news outlet said.

Mizan said the commander did not follow protocols in the moments leading up to the shooting down of the plane. The commander was ordered to pay fines to families of victims, the report added.

Mizan said the court also sentenced two personnel allegedly involved in running the surface-to-air missile system Tor M-1 to one year in prison each.

After a lengthy series of hearings, the court sentenced at least seven other personnel and air defence officers to up to three years in prison. According to Mizan, the verdicts are appealable within 20 days.


The report did not identify any of the defendants by name or further details.

The judiciary news agency also said Iran’s government plans to pay $150,000 for each victim to their families. It did not elaborate on how this money will be delivered to the families.

The hearing sessions have faced international criticism since starting in 2021. At that time, an association of the victims’ families also criticized the hearing and cast doubts on the court’s legitimacy. The group also alleged that none of the defendants were present at hearings.

Just hours before the shootdown in January 2020, Iran had fired ballistic missiles at American bases in Iraq in retaliation for the U.S. drone strike that killed top Iranian general Qassem Soleimani in Baghdad.
 

Ron in Regina

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Apr 9, 2008
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Re: Ukraine Flight 752


PM Blackface just said the Iranians shot the plane down.
Re: Ukraine Flight 752




Because they did.

Not that it matters, until he gets cooperation for "a full and complete investigation" from Iran, gropey's coming up empty, he's got nothing.
Re: Ukraine Flight 752


Well, at least we're reassured that it will be both full AND complete.

Probably until they come to their last AND final conclusion.
Re: iranian plane "crash"

Link: http://www.cjme.com/2020/01/11/under-pressure-iran-admits-it-shot-down-jetliner-by-mistake/

TEHRAN, Iran — Iran's Revolutionary Guard on Saturday acknowledged that it accidentally shot down the Ukrainian jetliner that crashed earlier this week, killing all 176 aboard, after the government had repeatedly denied Western accusations that it was responsible.
Re: Ukraine Flight 752


Meanwhile in war mongering Ottawa..

The response from Ottawa has been more muted, with Foreign Affairs Minister François-Philippe Champagne saying Soleimani's “aggressive actions have had a destabilizing effect in the region and beyond.”

But a former senior Canadian intelligence official was more explicit.

“Qassem Soleimani was a brutal yet talented terrorist leader,” Andrew Ellis told Global News in an interview. “That’s the best way I can describe him.”
An Iranian-American activist is accusing Prime Minister Justin Trudeau of “empty words” and “cliché” over the federal government’s handling of alleged Iranian agents operating on Canadian soil.

Masih Alinejad, a Brooklyn-based journalist and women’s rights activist, told The West Block host Mercedes Stephenson that the Canadian government must do more to address threats against Iranian Canadians from the Islamic republic’s agents.
“Iranian-Canadians in Canada, we love Canada. We love peace and security and democracy. We love Canada to be a shelter for, you know, decent people. And you’re putting the lives of Canadians in danger,” Alinejad said in an interview at the Halifax International Security Forum.
“That’s what I can say, because otherwise he’s going to come up with a lot of empty words saying that you stand with the people of Iran. Now, please sit down and make decisions. How to protect human rights, how to protect democracy in Canada. That’s very important.”

An investigation by Global’s current affairs program The New Reality – which spoke to Iranian Canadians, security and intelligence sources, and legal experts – suggested that there were upwards of 700, possibly more, of potentially dangerous Iranian-regime-connected individuals in Canada.

It also documented threats and intimidation of Iranian Canadians, allegedly conducted by individuals in Canada connected to Tehran. It’s not quite Chinese Police Stations in Canada but it’s interesting.

The Global News investigation revealed the FBI, who protected Alinejad 24 hours a day, subsequently told her to avoid traveling to Canada. If she was going, it would take months to come up with a plan to ensure her safety.

Alinejad is pushing the Canadian government to add the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corp (IRGC) as a terrorist entity, which would impose penalties on people and organizations dealing with the IRGC in Canada and bar members of the military branch from entering Canada. The U.S. labeled the IRGC a terrorist group in 2019.

The federal Liberals have sanctioned members of the IRGC, but has so far resisted calls to officially designate the organization a terrorist group under Canadian law.

“We continue to watch and make sure that we’re able to do everything we can that is responsible against the impact of the IRGC,” Trudeau told reporters Tuesday in Maple Ridge, B.C.
“As I have said many, many times, the Iranian regime responsible for shooting down of PS-752, the killing of its own citizens and killing of Canadian citizens, its sponsorship of terror around the world, means that we will continue to do everything necessary both to hold that regime to account … and to protect Canadians.”

Conservative Leader Pierre Poilievre was more direct.

“To learn from (Global’s) report that (there is) 700 (regime-connected individuals) was staggering, and it requires immediate action to kick them out,” Poilievre said in an interview last week.
The Conservative leader said he wants to see the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps. listed as a terrorist entity in Canada, more sanctions against Iran, and the creation of a foreign agent registry.
 

petros

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More muddled east posturing. Iran & Qatar fund many on the Islam baddies list for the West…& others are try’n to get permission to get from Afghanistan to Gaza to fight against Israel (ISIS & some other…), etc…to cut across other countries to get to Gaza.
Have you looked beyond Gaza to the attacks leading to deaths on US bases and navy in the ME?
 

spaminator

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Flight PS752 victims’ families say they’re not sorry to hear of Iran president death
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Published May 21, 2024 • 1 minute read
Members of a Canadian group representing families of those killed when Iranian officials shot down Flight PS752 in January 2020 say they are not sorry to hear of the death of the country's president in a helicopter crash.
Members of a Canadian group representing families of those killed when Iranian officials shot down Flight PS752 in January 2020 say they are not sorry to hear of the death of the country's president in a helicopter crash.
Members of a Canadian group representing families of those killed when Iranian officials shot down Flight PS752 in January 2020 say they are not sorry to hear of the death of Iran’s president.


President Ebrahim Raisi and Iran’s foreign minister were found dead Monday, hours after their helicopter crashed in fog.


Iran has offered no cause for the crash nor suggested sabotage brought down the helicopter, which fell in mountainous terrain in the country’s northwest.

Kouroush Doustshenas, whose fiancee was among the 176 people killed when the 2020 flight was shot down, says Raisi is known to many as the “butcher of Tehran” and kept skies open to civilian aviation during the firing of missiles at flight PS752.

Doustshenas says Raisi was also known for his role in the 1998 mass killings of peaceful protesters, the 2019 Bloody November massacres, and a vicious crackdown on the Woman, Life, Freedom movement that began in September 2022.


Fifty-five Canadian citizens and 30 permanent residents were among the 176 people killed on the Ukrainian International Airlines flight that was shot down by Iran’s Revolutionary Guard shortly after takeoff from Tehran’s Imam Khomeini Airport on Jan. 8, 2020.

In a statement Monday, the Association of Flight PS752 Victims said, “We vehemently sought to bring (Raisi) to justice for his crimes in a fair trial so that he could face the consequences of his heinous actions. We feel that we are robbed of such an opportunity, but we are not sorry about his death.”

— With files from The Associated Press.