Suspected Anthrax Outbreak

CanadianLove

Electoral Member
Feb 7, 2009
504
4
18
I'm surprised that this didn't make it to the forum. Lets READ the american report at the end, and see how NORMAL this is.

Suspected anthrax outbreak claims
more bison in N.W.T.
Posted: Jul 10, 2012 4:42 PM CT
Last Updated: Jul 10, 2012 7:34 PM CT
Twenty-three bison carcasses have been found near Fort Providence, N.W.T., making a total of 151 bison that are suspected to have died from an anthrax outbreak.

Five of the 23 latest carcasses were found near the Deh Cho bridge construction site. An incident command team from the territory’s Department of Environment and Natural Resources is disposing of the carcasses by spraying them with formaldehyde and burning them.

The department sent samples from the carcasses to a Canadian Food Inspection Agency to determine the exact cause of death.Judy McLinton, the department's spokeswoman, said the test results should be available next week.

During a routine anthrax surveillance last week, 128 carcasses of the large animals were found near Mills Lake, which is about 30 kilometres northeast of the community.

In response to the find, the department issued an anthrax emergency response plan to deal with the potential outbreak last week. It sent samples from the dead animals to a Canadian Food Inspection Agency lab in Lethbridge, Alta., to determine the exact cause of death.

The public is advised not to approach or touch the carcasses. Anyone who comes across dead bison is asked to notify the Department of Environment and Natural Resources.

Anthrax occurs naturally in the area. In certain conditions — in particular, high water levels followed by hot, dry conditions — the anthrax spores in the ground become concentrated in low-lying areas. Bison can inhale the spores and become infected.



Anthrax likely killed 128 bison in the N.W.T.
Carcasses found close to Mills Lake during a routine anthrax surveillance flight
Posted: Jul 6, 2012 2:07 PM CT
Last Updated: Jul 6, 2012 7:38 PM CT


Anthrax is believed to have killed 128 bison northwest of Fort Providence, N.W.T.

The carcasses were found close to Mills Lake during a routine anthrax surveillance flight this week.

The Department of Environment and Natural Resources has issued an anthrax emergency response plan to deal with the potential outbreak.

“A field test on a couple of carcasses did turn out positive,” said Judy McLinton, the department’s spokeswoman. “Given the number of carcasses and the chance when they looked at them that it was probably or potentially anthrax, we activated our emergency response plan.”

On Thursday, the department sent samples from the dead animals to a Canadian Food Inspection Agency lab in Lethbridge, Alta. for testing, she said. They expect the results in a week’s time.

McLinton said the department will start disposing of the carcasses. Typically they burn carcasses that have died of anthrax but given the number, she said that could take up to six weeks.

“They’ll treat the carcasses with formaldehyde, tarp them, because we want to keep the anthrax spores intact, and then we’ll burn as we move along.”

McLinton said it’s not possible to vaccinate bison for anthrax because the spores are in the soil.
She said the wet weather followed by a hot, dry stretch, contributed to the outbreak.

“What happens is if you get the right environmental conditions, which we have right now, in that area, the spores are in the ground, the bison go in, start rolling around, wallowing in the mud near the water and the spores come up and [the bison] inhale it,” she said.

McLinton said the last large outbreak in the Mackenzie Bison Sanctuary was in 1993 when 172 animals died. She said anthrax killed nine bison in the Mills Lake area in 2009.

People with cabins in the area have been warned to stay away from the dead bison and the department said anyone who sees bison carcasses should call ENR right away.

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_health/emergingissues/downloads/finalanthraxnaturalterror.pdf
 

Sparrow

Council Member
Nov 12, 2006
1,202
23
38
Quebec
I'm surprised that this didn't make it to the forum. Lets READ the american report at the end, and see how NORMAL this is.

Suspected anthrax outbreak claims
more bison in N.W.T.
CBC News
Posted: Jul 10, 2012 4:42 PM CT
Last Updated: Jul 10, 2012 7:34 PM CT

Twenty-three bison carcasses have been found near Fort Providence, N.W.T., making a total of 151 bison that are suspected to have died from an anthrax outbreak.

Five of the 23 latest carcasses were found near the Deh Cho bridge construction site. An incident command team from the territory’s Department of Environment and Natural Resources is disposing of the carcasses by spraying them with formaldehyde and burning them.

The department sent samples from the carcasses to a Canadian Food Inspection Agency to determine the exact cause of death.Judy McLinton, the department's spokeswoman, said the test results should be available next week.

During a routine anthrax surveillance last week, 128 carcasses of the large animals were found near Mills Lake, which is about 30 kilometres northeast of the community.

In response to the find, the department issued an anthrax emergency response plan to deal with the potential outbreak last week. It sent samples from the dead animals to a Canadian Food Inspection Agency lab in Lethbridge, Alta., to determine the exact cause of death.

The public is advised not to approach or touch the carcasses. Anyone who comes across dead bison is asked to notify the Department of Environment and Natural Resources.

Anthrax occurs naturally in the area. In certain conditions — in particular, high water levels followed by hot, dry conditions — the anthrax spores in the ground become concentrated in low-lying areas. Bison can inhale the spores and become infected.



Anthrax likely killed 128 bison in the N.W.T.
Carcasses found close to Mills Lake during a routine anthrax surveillance flight
CBC News
Posted: Jul 6, 2012 2:07 PM CT
Last Updated: Jul 6, 2012 7:38 PM CT


Anthrax is believed to have killed 128 bison northwest of Fort Providence, N.W.T.

The carcasses were found close to Mills Lake during a routine anthrax surveillance flight this week.

The Department of Environment and Natural Resources has issued an anthrax emergency response plan to deal with the potential outbreak.

“A field test on a couple of carcasses did turn out positive,” said Judy McLinton, the department’s spokeswoman. “Given the number of carcasses and the chance when they looked at them that it was probably or potentially anthrax, we activated our emergency response plan.”

On Thursday, the department sent samples from the dead animals to a Canadian Food Inspection Agency lab in Lethbridge, Alta. for testing, she said. They expect the results in a week’s time.

McLinton said the department will start disposing of the carcasses. Typically they burn carcasses that have died of anthrax but given the number, she said that could take up to six weeks.

“They’ll treat the carcasses with formaldehyde, tarp them, because we want to keep the anthrax spores intact, and then we’ll burn as we move along.”

McLinton said it’s not possible to vaccinate bison for anthrax because the spores are in the soil.
She said the wet weather followed by a hot, dry stretch, contributed to the outbreak.

“What happens is if you get the right environmental conditions, which we have right now, in that area, the spores are in the ground, the bison go in, start rolling around, wallowing in the mud near the water and the spores come up and [the bison] inhale it,” she said.

McLinton said the last large outbreak in the Mackenzie Bison Sanctuary was in 1993 when 172 animals died. She said anthrax killed nine bison in the Mills Lake area in 2009.

People with cabins in the area have been warned to stay away from the dead bison and the department said anyone who sees bison carcasses should call ENR right away.

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_health/emergingissues/downloads/finalanthraxnaturalterror.pdf
Glad you posted this, I didn't know it occurred naturally. I like new subjects that I can research and this is a good one.
 

The Old Medic

Council Member
May 16, 2010
1,330
2
38
The World
Anthrax has been a scourge of all ungulate animals for many thousands of years. Anthrax that was developed for Weapons" was just a concentrated form of natural anthrax, put into spore form.

The ONLY safe way of disposing of it is to burn it. That's true in nature, and in the lab.
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
22,541
7,553
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
From what I recalled they just bury the carcasses- But the article states differently.


Anthrax they incinerate the carcasses. Hoof & Mouth they shoot & bury.
Mad cow (in Canada) is reported to shut down the export of cattle from
Canada....but sounds like (in the USA, & I'm ready to be corrected here)
it's a shoot'em-bury'em-& shut up thing to the south with the reported
cases only seeming to happen in Canada even with two way traffic in
that industry and only an imaginary line dividing Canada & the US.

My Mom used to talk about outbreaks of Hoof & Mouth in Saskatchewan
in the '40's & '50's and she still looked haunted by the telling decades
later. Digging a trench, shooting the cattle one by one and pushing them
into the hole....then shooting the family dog and throwing it on top of the
pile before buring the lot of them.