Police say 5 pedestrians deliberately run down in London were targeted because they were Muslims

Blackleaf

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Oct 9, 2004
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It makes a nice change. It's usually Muslims mowing innocents down in the streets in cars.
 

Decapoda

Council Member
Mar 4, 2016
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It makes a nice change. It's usually Muslims mowing innocents down in the streets in cars.
That's only because ...as Jagmeet insists....Canada is a violent, racist country, where"Muslims can’t walk down the streets if they wear a hijab because THEY WILL BE KILLED!!!" What do you expect Muslims to do...just put up with being killed in the streets by average Canadians?

Truth is...Jagmeet's comments are irresponsible, insulting, incredibly dangerous, and his disgusting hate and hyped up antagonism creates the seeds for violence. He claims to be trying to fight for the cause, but in reality he's using this for political gain by dividing Canadians, creating hate and division, not speaking out against it. Talk like this does precisely nothing to contribute to a solution it only fires people up and puts more people in danger.
 

spaminator

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Oct 26, 2009
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Feds will soon crack down on online hate in wake of fatal attack: senior minister
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
David Ljunggren
Publishing date:Jun 09, 2021 • 16 hours ago • 2 minute read • 6 Comments
Canada will soon unveil measures to crack down on online extremism following the killing of a Muslim family earlier this week in London, Ont.
Canada will soon unveil measures to crack down on online extremism following the killing of a Muslim family earlier this week in London, Ont. PHOTO BY ELCO VAN BERKEL /iStock / Getty Images
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OTTAWA — Canada will soon unveil measures to crack down on online extremism following the killing of a Muslim family, a crime that police said was inspired by hate, a government minister said on Wednesday.

Four members of the family were killed on Sunday when a pickup truck jumped the curb and ran them over in London, Ont.


“Our government is continuing to do what is necessary, obviously working with the social media platforms, to combat online hate and we’ll have more to say on specific measures in the coming weeks,” Intergovernmental Affairs Minister Dominic LeBlanc told reporters.

There is no evidence that the suspect, Nathaniel Veltman, had any connection to hate groups.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, facing complaints from religious and ethnic communities that Ottawa has not done enough to combat bigotry and racism, promised on Tuesday to intensify efforts to fight far-right groups.

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“We don’t yet know all the causes or reasons, but there is probably an element of online incitation to violence,” Trudeau told a conference on digital governance on Wednesday.

In January, he asked Heritage Minister Steven Guilbeault to work with Public Safety Minister Bill Blair “to take action on combating hate groups and online hate.” Neither minister’s office was immediately available for comment.

In February, Canada named the far-right Proud Boys a terrorist entity, saying it posed an active security threat.

Stephanie Carvin, an assistant professor and security expert at Ottawa’s Carleton University, said the most likely short-term option was to ban more extremist organizations.


“The problem with targeting these ideologically motivated violent extremist groups is that they just resurface,” she said by phone, calling for policies to target the far-right movement as a whole.

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Christian Leuprecht, a politics professor and expert on security and terrorism at the Royal Military College of Canada, noted official data showed hate crimes reported to police fell in 2019 compared to 2018.

Rather than listing groups and broadening the definition of what behaviour is acceptable, Canada needs special policy tools to deal with the separate phenomena of hate, violent extremism and extremist violence, Leuprecht said.

“I am concerned that we are creating a very big hammer that conflates all of these … and which might score political points but doesn’t actually treat the problem,” he said in a phone interview.
 
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taxslave

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Feds will soon crack down on online hate in wake of fatal attack: senior minister
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
David Ljunggren
Publishing date:Jun 09, 2021 • 16 hours ago • 2 minute read • 6 Comments
Canada will soon unveil measures to crack down on online extremism following the killing of a Muslim family earlier this week in London, Ont.
Canada will soon unveil measures to crack down on online extremism following the killing of a Muslim family earlier this week in London, Ont. PHOTO BY ELCO VAN BERKEL /iStock / Getty Images
Article content
OTTAWA — Canada will soon unveil measures to crack down on online extremism following the killing of a Muslim family, a crime that police said was inspired by hate, a government minister said on Wednesday.

Four members of the family were killed on Sunday when a pickup truck jumped the curb and ran them over in London, Ont.


“Our government is continuing to do what is necessary, obviously working with the social media platforms, to combat online hate and we’ll have more to say on specific measures in the coming weeks,” Intergovernmental Affairs Minister Dominic LeBlanc told reporters.

There is no evidence that the suspect, Nathaniel Veltman, had any connection to hate groups.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, facing complaints from religious and ethnic communities that Ottawa has not done enough to combat bigotry and racism, promised on Tuesday to intensify efforts to fight far-right groups.

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STORY CONTINUES BELOW

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“We don’t yet know all the causes or reasons, but there is probably an element of online incitation to violence,” Trudeau told a conference on digital governance on Wednesday.

In January, he asked Heritage Minister Steven Guilbeault to work with Public Safety Minister Bill Blair “to take action on combating hate groups and online hate.” Neither minister’s office was immediately available for comment.

In February, Canada named the far-right Proud Boys a terrorist entity, saying it posed an active security threat.

Stephanie Carvin, an assistant professor and security expert at Ottawa’s Carleton University, said the most likely short-term option was to ban more extremist organizations.


“The problem with targeting these ideologically motivated violent extremist groups is that they just resurface,” she said by phone, calling for policies to target the far-right movement as a whole.

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STORY CONTINUES BELOW

Article content
Christian Leuprecht, a politics professor and expert on security and terrorism at the Royal Military College of Canada, noted official data showed hate crimes reported to police fell in 2019 compared to 2018.

Rather than listing groups and broadening the definition of what behaviour is acceptable, Canada needs special policy tools to deal with the separate phenomena of hate, violent extremism and extremist violence, Leuprecht said.

“I am concerned that we are creating a very big hammer that conflates all of these … and which might score political points but doesn’t actually treat the problem,” he said in a phone interview.
The catch is who gets to decide what is online hate. And how that law will dovetail with our charter rights.
 

spaminator

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Oct 26, 2009
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'SHAKEN BUT UNBROKEN': Man charged in alleged hate crime against Muslim mom, daughter in Hamilton
PM Trudeau tweeted he strongly condemned such 'violent, hateful, and abhorrent behaviour'

Author of the article:Chris Doucette
Chris Doucette
Publishing date:Jul 14, 2021 • 19 hours ago • 2 minute read • 96 Comments
A Hamilton Police cruiser.
A Hamilton Police cruiser. PHOTO BY BRAD HUNTER /Toronto Sun
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A 40-year-old man is accused of almost running down a Muslim mother and daughter in Hamilton, then chasing after the pair, hurling racial slurs and threatening to kill them.

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Hamilton Police say the alleged hate crime — which comes five weeks after a pickup truck driver ran down a Muslim family in London, Ont., killing four people and seriously injuring a fifth — unfolded as the mother and daughter walked through a plaza parking lot in the Ancaster Meadowlands around 9:30 p.m. on Monday.


“An interaction occurred after a vehicle pulling out of a parking spot almost struck one of the victims,” police said in a statement. “The interaction escalated with the suspect uttering threats towards the victims while using racial slurs targeting the Muslim community.

“The victims ran across the street and hid behind some bushes while the suspect searched for them,” police said, alleging the man “eventually located them and threatened to kill them.”

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Police said one of the victims “ran screaming for help” and bystanders intervened as the motorist took off.

The National Council of Canadian Muslims posted a message on Twitter saying they are “deeply saddened to hear of yet another terrifying, seemingly Islamaphobia-motivated attack on two Muslim women wearing hijab.”


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The NCCM also released a statement from the family of the mother and daughter.

“We are shaken but unbroken after the attack on our family,” the statement reads. “Let us be clear: This individual attempted to terrorize our family.

“In light of the London attack, this is incredibly terrifying for our family,” the family says, before urging the government to “commit to taking stronger action.”

On Twitter, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said he was “deeply disturbed by reports of an Islamophobic attack on Muslim women in Hamilton” and he strongly condemned such “violent, hateful, and abhorrent behaviour.”


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“It has no place in our country or any of our communities,” Trudeau tweeted. “We will continue to stand together and take action.”

NDP Leader Andrea Horwath also took to Twitter to denounce Islamophobia.

“My heart is with the women who endured this hateful attack, their family & Muslim communities across #HamOnt & Ontario,” Horwath said. “Everyone deserves to walk down the street in peace, without fear.”

“Urgent government action to fight Islamophobia is long overdue & desperately needed.”


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In a video posted on Twitter, Hamilton Police Chief Frank Bergen said he is outraged by the “blatant acts of hatred” that have left the city’s Muslim community “feeling unsafe.”

“We stand with the Muslim community here in Hamilton and across the country in condemning Islamophobia,” Bergen said. “These incidents are taken seriously and then fully investigated.”


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“As chief, I am offering my support and assurance that Hamilton police will continue to do everything we can to ensure your safety,” he added.

Vince Licata, of Cambridge, is charged with three counts of uttering threat to cause death, two counts of assault with a weapon, dangerous operation of a motor vehicle and failure to comply with a probation order.


Police ask any witnesses to this incident to call the investigator at 905-546-3851 or Crime Stoppers anonymously at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477).

cdoucette@postmedia.com

On Twitter: @SunDoucette
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spaminator

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Cambridge mosque vandalized in suspected hate crime
The alleged attack comes as more hate crimes are being reported

Author of the article:Scott Laurie
Publishing date:Jul 15, 2021 • 3 hours ago • 2 minute read • 28 Comments
Images released by the Ahmadiyya Muslim Jama'at Canada of vandalism committed at the Baitul Kareem Mosque in Cambridge.
Images released by the Ahmadiyya Muslim Jama'at Canada of vandalism committed at the Baitul Kareem Mosque in Cambridge. PHOTO BY HANDOUT
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Leaders of a mosque in Cambridge are picking up the pieces after vandals caused tens of thousands of dollars in damage in what Muslim community leaders say was an act of hate.

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“Because of recent incidents across the country, I would assume people are disappointed and upset that these types of things are happening in Canada,” said Asif Khan, spokesperson for Ahmadiyya Muslim Jama’at.


Leaders of the Baitul Kareem Mosque in Cambridge believe the vandalism happened Wednesday between 2 and 4 p.m.

They say an imam was about to enter the building when he heard a commotion and left to call police.

When officers arrived, no one was inside. But the damage was extensive, with appliances ripped apart and literature strewn about.


“We are deeply troubled to learn of this attack on the Baitul Kareem Mosque,” said Lal Khan Malik, national president of the Ahmadiyya Canada. “Our mosques have always served as symbols of peace in the community, and it is hurtful for us to see our mosque attacked and vandalized in this fashion.”

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Police are investigating.

“We are deeply disturbed by this senseless criminal act and the significant destruction towards the Baitul Kareem Mosque in Cambridge,” Waterloo Regional Police Chief Bryan Larkin said. “Places of worship are sacred, and this criminal act cannot and will not be tolerated in Waterloo Region.

“Rest assured, we are actively investigating, and committing appropriate resources to this investigation. My thoughts are with our Muslim community as they cope with this destructive and hateful crime.”

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“I can’t say for sure whether this is Muslim hate or is this just something very unfortunate.” Khan said, adding, “These rising trends of hate, prejudice, racism is on the rise and it’s unfortunate. We hope that these are trends that don’t continue.”

On June 6, four members of the Afzaal family in London, Ont. were killed when they were allegedly deliberately run down by a truck driver in what police there called an act of hate. Only 9-year-old Fayez Afzaal survived.

On Monday, Hamilton Police announced they had arrested a 40-year-old Cambridge man after an alleged hate crime attack on a mother and daughter walking through a plaza parking lot. Police say the suspect uttered threats while using slurs against the Muslim community.


The Ahmadiyya Muslim Jama’at – with 65 chapters across the country — says it has heightened security measures at its mosques and prayer centres.

“Our hope and prayer is that these are one-offs and this will dissipate,” Khan said. “But at the same time I guess we all have to be a bit more aware.”

slaurie@postmedia.com
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