Omnibus: Conservative Leadership Race

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
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Moccasin Flats
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Now think about the number of times Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has engaged in unethical conduct where Liberal cabinet ministers and MPs have never revolted.
They cant. Theyll be bullied into oblivion.
 
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spaminator

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Oct 26, 2009
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Conservative Party reviewing Patrick Brown’s appeal request
A spokesman for Brown said he won’t be making any decisions about running for re-election as Brampton mayor until he has time to talk with his friends and family.

Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Stephanie Taylor
Publishing date:Jul 11, 2022 • 15 hours ago • 2 minute read • 24 Comments

The Conservative Party of Canada has brought in independent legal counsel to help review whether one of its committees has the jurisdiction to hear Patrick Brown challenge his disqualification.


Brown has hired Marie Henein, a high-profile lawyer who successfully defended Jian Ghomeshi, among other clients.

Henein wrote to the party’s top brass last week requesting its dispute resolution appeal committee be convened and that an appeal date be set, asking to hear back no later than last Saturday.

Conservative spokesman Yaroslav Baran confirmed the party responded Friday night to say it has been looking into whether its appeals committee has the jurisdiction to field Brown’s bid.

“Independent counsel has therefore been retained to advise on this important question, which will guide the party’s response to Mr. Brown’s lawyers,” Baran wrote.

Brown’s campaign is considering what other avenues may exist to fight the party’s decision, which has seized its top officials since it was made.


A spokesman for Brown said over the weekend he won’t be making any decisions about running for re-election as Brampton mayor until he has time to talk with his friends and family.

Chisholm Pothier said Brown spent the weekend attending a multicultural festival in Brampton and celebrating the Muslim holiday of Eid al-Adha.

Brown entered the race without resigning his job as Brampton’s mayor, and previously said he would consider running again in October’s municipal election if he thought he couldn’t win the federal race.

He has until Aug. 19 to register as a mayoral candidate, but Brown’s position in the federal race changed dramatically last week when the party’s leadership election organizing committee voted to boot him from the contest.


Committee members ousted him in an 11 to six vote over an allegation that he breached federal election financing laws.

“He isn’t making any decisions until he has time to consult with friends and family,” Pothier wrote of Brown’s plans to seek a second term as mayor.

While the party didn’t release details behind the allegation, a longtime Conservative organizer came forward last week to say she reported Brown to the party, alleging he was involved in an arrangement that saw her get paid by a private company for doing work on his campaign.

Brown’s campaign said Conservative party brass refused to release the full details of the allegation, making it difficult to respond, and said it offered to reimburse the money paid to the organizer in question because it thought their work was done as a volunteer.


Since his disqualification, Brown has also accused the party of removing him to stack the odds in favour of longtime Ottawa-area MP Pierre Poilievre, seen as his main rival.

Both Poilievre and the party have dismissed his accusation.

Ian Brodie, chair of the leadership election organizing committee that voted to remove Brown, emailed party members last Friday to say Brown knew the allegations he was facing and the party needed to act because it couldn’t afford to have a candidate under investigation for breaking federal laws.

Meanwhile, the five remaining candidates in the race to become the party’s next leader flipped pancakes and greeted supporters at the Calgary Stampede, with less than two months to go until ballots are counted and the winner is named.
 

spaminator

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Oct 26, 2009
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Pierre Poilievre risks hefty fine with plan to skip Conservative leadership debate
Party rules mandate leadership candidates to attend official debates or be fined $50,000

Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Stephanie Taylor
Publishing date:Jul 21, 2022 • 1 day ago • 3 minute read • 132 Comments

OTTAWA — The campaign for Pierre Poilievre, the perceived front-runner in the federal Conservative leadership race, announced Thursday he won’t take part in the party’s third debate planned for August, facing the consequence of a $50,000 fine.

Jenni Byrne, a senior member of Poilievre’s team, released a scathing statement on Twitter explaining his decision after the party announced it would proceed with the debate in early August.

Conservative party rules say candidates must participate in official leadership debates or face an “automatic $50,000 penalty.”

“Participation is mandatory and no substitution will be permitted,” according to the rules.

Byrne’s statement noted Poilievre took part in the first two official debates in May, plus one put on by the Canada Strong and Free Network — an organization that promotes the conservative movement.



It also slammed the English-language debate the party held in Edmonton in May because it featured sound effects and a series of questions about the candidates’ taste in music and television.

“It was not the campaign’s fault that the party’s Edmonton debate was widely recognized as an embarrassment … candidates were given ping-pong paddles to hold up when they wanted to speak. It was more of a game show than a debate,” the statement read.

“And it happened despite strong cautions to the party about both the moderator and format — all of which were ignored.”

The debate was hosted by former veteran political journalist Tom Clark, who Poilievre’s campaign criticized as a “Laurentian elite liberal media personality.”


A request for comment from Clark has not yet been returned.

Party spokesman Yaroslav Baran said he understands “there are multiple views on the debates held to date,” and highlighted how race rules say attendance is mandatory.

Byrne’s statement said the party’s plan for a third debate comes as the Poilievre campaign works to get out the vote among Conservative members.

Party members have until the beginning of September to return their ballots before the results are unveiled in Ottawa on Sept.10. Voting is already underway with most of the more than 670,000 ballots having been mailed to members.

“The sole objective of the campaign now is to get new members and existing members to fill out their ballots and submit them before the September deadline. Pierre will be on the road again, without interruption, to help make that happen,” Poilievre’s campaign said.


The statement goes on to attack fellow leadership candidate Jean Charest’s repeated calls for a third debate, saying the ex-Quebec premier couldn’t draw the same crowd sizes as Poilievre during the phase of the race when candidates were selling memberships to supporters.

“That is why he wants another debate — to use Pierre’s popularity with members to bring out an audience he can’t get on his own.”

Besides Charest, candidates Scott Aitchison and Roman Baber had also expressed support for another debate.

The campaign of Leslyn Lewis had said she would attend as required.

Poilievre’s decision to skip the debate means there will be not one, but two fewer candidates on the stage, given the recent disqualification of Patrick Brown over an allegation he may have breached federal elections laws.

Brown has denied that accusation.

The party says the decision to host a debate in August came after it surveyed members last week, with a majority of the 24,000 who responded expressing support for another debate.

The decision to proceed was made Wednesday night by the party’s leadership election organizing committee.

Although officials and campaigns have just weeks to plan for the event, campaigns had been informed earlier in the race that their candidates could be called back for a debate in early August at the party’s discretion.
 

spaminator

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Oct 26, 2009
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Charest's team won't say if he'll stay in Conservative Party if he loses leadership
Strategists warn the messages being put out by Charest's camp are potentially confusing for the membership.

Author of the article:La Presse Canadienne
La Presse Canadienne
Michel Saba
Publishing date:Jul 21, 2022 • 1 day ago • 2 minute read • 28 Comments

As rumours of the possible creation of a centre-right federal party spread, Conservative leadership candidate Jean Charest’s team is refusing to clarify whether the former Quebec premier will remain with the party should he lose his bid to lead it.


“Mr. Charest is a longtime Conservative party member. He is entirely invested in the current leadership race, which he intends to win on Sept. 10,” said Charest press attaché Laurence Tôth in response to repeated questions by Presse Canadienne on whether the candidate will remain with the party in the event of a defeat. Charest also declined to be interviewed about his future within the conservative movement.

In her recently published book, political commentator and Charest campaign co-chair Tasha Kheiriddin cited the possibility of the creation of a “liberal-conservative” party if the plan to unite the Conservatives fails. However, in a recent interview with Radio-Canada she insisted she is not promoting such an idea.


Meanwhile, Conservative strategists interviewed by Presse Canadienne say the messages being put out by the Charest camp are potentially confusing for the party membership.

Marc-André Leclerc, who was an adviser to former Conservative leader Andrew Scheer, said he thinks Charest would do well to remain in the party, since “he’s already been criticized for not having been seen in the party over the past few years.”

Leclerc said the current lack of clarity could see some party members ask if Charest is “just passing through.” He also described Kheiriddin’s comments as “a bit bizarre,” given that the leadership vote has yet to be held. “You’re in the process of suggesting a new party will be formed while (the leadership race) is still going on.”


Rodolphe Husny, a former adviser in Stephen Harper’s government, said Kheiriddin should clarify whether she was expressing her own point of view as an author or speaking as Charest’s campaign co-chair. He said the presence of two contradictory narratives — ” ‘we think we have a chance to win’ (versus) ‘maybe there’s a Plan B with a coalition’ — creates confusion and sows doubt over the real chances of success.”

However, Husny believes it to be “quite normal” for Charest and the other candidates to state that victory is possible if only to motivate their supporters to get out and vote, an operation that will continue for another month.

Interestingly, soon after this Presse Canadienne report was first published online, Charest took to his Twitter account to apparently address the concerns expressed in it.



Conservative Party of Canada members will fill out a ballot on which they indicate their choice by order of preference. Apart from Charest, the candidates are perceived frontrunner Pierre Poilievre, Leslyn Lewis, Scott Aitchison and Roman Baber.

Ballots must be mailed in and the results will be announced Sept. 10 in Ottawa.
 
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spaminator

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Conservative party says it had evidence to disqualify Brown, releases new allegations
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Publishing date:Jul 22, 2022 • 9 hours ago • 4 minute read • 29 Comments

OTTAWA — A Conservative committee reviewing Patrick Brown’s disqualification from the leadership race has concluded the party had the evidence it needed to recommend he be removed from contention.


Its decision, released late Friday, contains new allegations Brown used money orders to purchase memberships and allowed non-compliant membership sales through a portal.

“Mr. Brown was afforded ample opportunity to address these serious concerns,” Ian Brodie, chair of the party’s leadership election organizing committee, said in a statement.

The party says decisions made by its dispute resolution appeals committee are final.

The committee stunned party members and Canadians alike earlier this month when it voted 11-6 to remove Brown from the race. Brown has since launched his campaign for re-election as mayor of Brampton, Ont.

Brown hired Marie Henein, one of Canada’s best-known defence lawyers, who filed a notice of appeal of the decision to oust him. The party then hired an outside lawyer to review that appeal request, and was bracing for additional legal action.


The party said the decision to disqualify Brown was based on a recommendation from its chief returning officer. A dispute resolution appeals committee had to decide whether the officer possessed the evidence to recommend his removal.

It says evidence included allegations Brown allowed more than 500 non-compliant membership sales.

“Correspondence on this issue from the candidate indicates both an unwillingness and an inability to provide the (chief returning officer) with information about the individuals who were accessing the portal to register memberships the (party) had found to be non-compliant,” the decision says.

It said Brown left the issue unresolved for two weeks and gave “evasive responses.”


In a statement Friday, Brown’s campaign called the ruling unjust and “an affront to democracy.”

“Also in their ruling the party has significantly changed their story on why they disallowed Patrick Brown as a candidate, now that their first story has fallen apart,” his campaign office said. “Originally the party was telling the media it was because of improper corporate donations, which have since been found to be bogus claims. Now the party is saying, in their ruling, that the reason was because they received 500 suspicious memberships … and claim, without any evidence or supporting documentation, that the memberships were brought in by the Patrick Brown campaign.”

Brown is to continue to pursue legal action,the statement said.


“This is absurd and makes clear this was a rigged race from the start to install their chosen candidate, Pierre Poilievre, as leader.”

The decision also addresses an allegation that Brown may have broken federal election law, which was brought to the party by a whistleblower.

After Brown’s ousting, Debbie Jodoin, a longtime organizer with the party, came forward as the one who spoke up, alleging Brown arranged for a third-party corporation to pay her to work on his campaign.

Brown has denied wrongdoing and said the party didn’t provide his campaign enough details for him to properly respond.

In its decision, the dispute committee says the party offered Brown a chance to provide exculpatory evidence. “He did not,” the decision says.


“Instead, the candidate offered the explanation of an innocent mistake and an offer to reimburse any implicated corporation expenses. That is an excuse, not exculpatory evidence.”

The decision says the party considered the allegations Brown faced, and also the way he responded.

When it came to issues surrounding money orders, the dispute committee says the party received 78 money orders attached to membership forms that appeared to come from the same person.

The decision says Brown told the party he raised the issue with the individual in question, who said the allegation was false.

It says the party was left with information that Brown’s campaign had improperly bought memberships.

“When confronted with this evidence, the candidate chose simply to deny the allegation without providing any satisfactory explanation,” the decision says.


BROWN CAMPAIGN STATEMENT

This is unjust and an affront to democracy. Also in their ruling the Party has significantly changed their story on why they disallowed Patrick Brown as a candidate, now that their first story has fallen apart. Originally the Party was telling the media it was because of improper corporate donations, which have since been found to be bogus claims. Now the Party is saying, in their ruling, that the reason was because they received 500 suspicious memberships (out of roughly 400,000+ new memberships that came into the party) and claim, without any evidence or supporting documentation, that the memberships were brought in by the Patrick Brown campaign. This is absurd and makes clear this was a rigged race from the start to install their chosen candidate, Pierre Poilievre, as Leader.


Patrick Brown is alleged to have broken rules, with no evidence, while Pierre Poilievre is blatantly breaking the rules by refusing to participate in a mandatory debate — yet all he is getting is a monetary fine. That is further proof of how corrupt this race is.

Patrick Brown will continue to pursue legal action to address this injustice, but it is clear he will not be reinstated to the contest for leadership of the Conservative Party. He has announced his intention to re-offer for Mayor of Brampton and will be focusing his efforts on that. In the meantime, he will be voting for Jean Charest in the Conservative Party leadership contest, as the candidate that best represents his vision of a modern, inclusive party. He encourages his supporters to support any of the other candidates that best reflect their views, other than Pierre Poilievre whose bigoted and racist policies are a threat to the fabric of this great country.
 

Dixie Cup

House Member
Sep 16, 2006
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Edmonton
Conservative Party reviewing Patrick Brown’s appeal request
A spokesman for Brown said he won’t be making any decisions about running for re-election as Brampton mayor until he has time to talk with his friends and family.

Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Stephanie Taylor
Publishing date:Jul 11, 2022 • 15 hours ago • 2 minute read • 24 Comments

The Conservative Party of Canada has brought in independent legal counsel to help review whether one of its committees has the jurisdiction to hear Patrick Brown challenge his disqualification.


Brown has hired Marie Henein, a high-profile lawyer who successfully defended Jian Ghomeshi, among other clients.

Henein wrote to the party’s top brass last week requesting its dispute resolution appeal committee be convened and that an appeal date be set, asking to hear back no later than last Saturday.

Conservative spokesman Yaroslav Baran confirmed the party responded Friday night to say it has been looking into whether its appeals committee has the jurisdiction to field Brown’s bid.

“Independent counsel has therefore been retained to advise on this important question, which will guide the party’s response to Mr. Brown’s lawyers,” Baran wrote.

Brown’s campaign is considering what other avenues may exist to fight the party’s decision, which has seized its top officials since it was made.


A spokesman for Brown said over the weekend he won’t be making any decisions about running for re-election as Brampton mayor until he has time to talk with his friends and family.

Chisholm Pothier said Brown spent the weekend attending a multicultural festival in Brampton and celebrating the Muslim holiday of Eid al-Adha.

Brown entered the race without resigning his job as Brampton’s mayor, and previously said he would consider running again in October’s municipal election if he thought he couldn’t win the federal race.

He has until Aug. 19 to register as a mayoral candidate, but Brown’s position in the federal race changed dramatically last week when the party’s leadership election organizing committee voted to boot him from the contest.


Committee members ousted him in an 11 to six vote over an allegation that he breached federal election financing laws.

“He isn’t making any decisions until he has time to consult with friends and family,” Pothier wrote of Brown’s plans to seek a second term as mayor.

While the party didn’t release details behind the allegation, a longtime Conservative organizer came forward last week to say she reported Brown to the party, alleging he was involved in an arrangement that saw her get paid by a private company for doing work on his campaign.

Brown’s campaign said Conservative party brass refused to release the full details of the allegation, making it difficult to respond, and said it offered to reimburse the money paid to the organizer in question because it thought their work was done as a volunteer.


Since his disqualification, Brown has also accused the party of removing him to stack the odds in favour of longtime Ottawa-area MP Pierre Poilievre, seen as his main rival.

Both Poilievre and the party have dismissed his accusation.

Ian Brodie, chair of the leadership election organizing committee that voted to remove Brown, emailed party members last Friday to say Brown knew the allegations he was facing and the party needed to act because it couldn’t afford to have a candidate under investigation for breaking federal laws.

Meanwhile, the five remaining candidates in the race to become the party’s next leader flipped pancakes and greeted supporters at the Calgary Stampede, with less than two months to go until ballots are counted and the winner is named.
 

Dixie Cup

House Member
Sep 16, 2006
4,399
2,418
113
Edmonton
I wouldn't have an issue if Lewis won the leadership race. But then, I'm not a Conservative member so I can't vote anyway.
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
17,609
3,358
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
Ironically, I can see a general freak out about this endorsement from a former Canadian PM….from those that don’t have an issue about Obama (a former foreign President who didn’t endorse Joe Biden) endorsing Justin Trudeau.
 
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