Non-Coalition Coalition that’s Definitely NOT a Coalition…

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
22,544
7,553
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
It ties into how many strikes there will be.
Ahhh….ok….& the NDP where the party Unions supported back when the NDP was Union friendly instead of the “Left of Left fringe party” before the Liberals began trying to ‘Out-Left’ them leading to the merger in all but name of the NDP/Liberals (or is it Liberal/NDP’ers?) back when they came out’a the closet before the Ottawa parking situation of early 2022 with Jagmeet & Justin finishing each other’s sentences….Before the announcement of their current supposedly temporary merger.
1707693727233.jpegSo we’re going to see demands for cost-of-living increases to try and not only keep up with the inflation in Canada (where they don’t count food or fuel as part of anything that’s been inflated) but outpace it, so that’ll be…whatever it’ll be I guess. Good times.
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Taxslave2

House Member
Aug 13, 2022
2,533
1,511
113
Federal Environment Minister Stephen Guilbeault, whose press secretary told the CBC:
“We welcome the NDP’s bill to the House. Advertisement has a big role to play in public perception, and the industry is racking in record profits. We will carefully assess their bill and look forward to productive debates and discussions around this important issue.”

Currently Chuck Angus and Gabrault are the best vote getters the Conservative Party has.
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
22,544
7,553
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
The NDP are trending up. Greens holding steady.
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A CTV News political analyst and former communications director to former prime minister Paul Martin — told Kapelos and the rest of the CTV’s Question Period strategists panel that the potential end of the supply-and-confidence deal doesn’t necessarily spell the end of the Liberal government.

“So If I were the Liberals, I think there's an opportunity to divorce themselves from this deal, get themselves away from the agenda, which I think is actually starting to harm them over time,” he said.
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petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
108,486
10,933
113
Low Earth Orbit
The NDP are trending up. Greens holding steady.
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A CTV News political analyst and former communications director to former prime minister Paul Martin — told Kapelos and the rest of the CTV’s Question Period strategists panel that the potential end of the supply-and-confidence deal doesn’t necessarily spell the end of the Liberal government.

“So If I were the Liberals, I think there's an opportunity to divorce themselves from this deal, get themselves away from the agenda, which I think is actually starting to harm them over time,” he said.
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Huge majority...
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
22,544
7,553
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
Singh's hopes appeared to be fading Tuesday as he explained what the NDP's relationship with the minority government will look like if the deal dies next month.

The NDP wouldn't automatically support the passage of government bills, and the Liberals would have to negotiate with them every time they want support, Singh said.

BUT….but his foot dragging & grumbling, if pushed…will back the Liberal/NDP’ers until the election in the Fall of 2025. The NDP:
1) can’t afford an election not financially
2) Jagmeet’s pension doesn’t come to fruition until the Spring of 2025
3) this is the closest the Federal NDP has come to actual power, or will come to power in the foreseeable future


"That doesn't mean we can't find ways to pass other bills that we still support. That doesn't mean that we can't continue to push ... things like the anti-scab legislation that we want to see happen," he said.

In other words, the other elements of the agreement aren't necessarily doomed if the deal falls apart.

When it comes to major votes that could trigger a snap election, such as on the budget, Singh said the NDP would have to figure it out on a case-by-case basis… meaning the NDP will back the Liberals no matter what until the Fall of 2025…

Pulling support from the Liberals if they don't meet the March 1 deadline is "not well thought out strategy," Liberal MP Hedy Fry chimed in on social media Tuesday.
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
108,486
10,933
113
Low Earth Orbit
Singh's hopes appeared to be fading Tuesday as he explained what the NDP's relationship with the minority government will look like if the deal dies next month.

The NDP wouldn't automatically support the passage of government bills, and the Liberals would have to negotiate with them every time they want support, Singh said.

BUT….but his foot dragging & grumbling, if pushed…will back the Liberal/NDP’ers until the election in the Fall of 2025. The NDP:
1) can’t afford an election not financially
2) Jagmeet’s pension doesn’t come to fruition until the Spring of 2025
3) this is the closest the Federal NDP has come to actual power, or will come to power in the foreseeable future


"That doesn't mean we can't find ways to pass other bills that we still support. That doesn't mean that we can't continue to push ... things like the anti-scab legislation that we want to see happen," he said.

In other words, the other elements of the agreement aren't necessarily doomed if the deal falls apart.

When it comes to major votes that could trigger a snap election, such as on the budget, Singh said the NDP would have to figure it out on a case-by-case basis… meaning the NDP will back the Liberals no matter what until the Fall of 2025…

Pulling support from the Liberals if they don't meet the March 1 deadline is "not well thought out strategy," Liberal MP Hedy Fry chimed in on social media Tuesday.
Weird suit. Bulletproof plates? Kevlar wrap?

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Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
22,544
7,553
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
The Liberal minority government will lose (maybe) its supply-and-confidence non-coalition coalition that’s definitely not a coalition-type coalition deal with the New Democrats if it doesn’t deliver a pharmacare bill that includes plans for a single-payer, universal system to cover prescription medications, New Democrat Leader Jagmeet Singh says.

At a Tuesday press conference on Parliament Hill, Mr. Singh made his strongest comments yet about what his party expects from the promised legislation. The bill is a key part of the agreement that the NDP struck with the government nearly two years ago to keep the Liberals in power no matter what.

Through it, the NDP agreed to support the Liberals in the House of Commons until 2025 in exchange for policy concessions such as anti-scab legislation, dental care, pharmacare, & the illusion of relevance.

Under the original agreement, the government said it would pass a Canada Pharmacare Act by the end of 2023 as part of its progress toward a universal national program. However, the NDP granted the government an (the first one so far) extension on that pledge, and the Liberals now only need to introduce the bill by March 1…

“If they don’t make this deadline again, then they would have broken the agreement,” (again?) Mr. Singh said, adding the NDP expects the pharmacare bill to include a legal framework and “it has to be single-payer, universal.”
The government relies on the supply-and-confidence non-coalition coalition that’s definitely not a coalition-type coalition deal with the NDP to ensure their policy agenda gets through the House of Commons and doesn’t get bogged down by Opposition delay tactics. For example, the NDP votes with the Liberals to shut down democratic debate and force votes.
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Bloc Leader Yves-François Blanchet said Tuesday that he hopes the deal is ripped up as of March 1, so that Parliament returns to functioning as a true minority, where the government needs to negotiate support for bills on a case-by-case basis.

If the deal is broken, Mr. Singh said his party would no longer provide such support automatically, though he also said he wouldn’t necessarily (meaning at all before the Fall of 2025) force an election either…

The Liberal government is politically weaker than it was when it signed the “Honk-Honk Handshake” deal with the NDP in 2022, and the New Democrats are now raising the stakes (in Poker it’s called Bluffing) and asking for more to keep their support, said Karl Bélanger, president of Traxxion Stratégies and former NDP national director. He said the brinksmanship comes with risks because he doesn’t believe it’s in either party’s interest for their agreement to fall apart.
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Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
22,544
7,553
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
The end of the (Non-coalition coalition that’s definitely not a coalition-type coalition) accord wouldn’t automatically (or at all) mean a snap election.
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In addition, does the NDP really want to provoke an election now, which if the polls are accurate, would result in a huge Conservative majority where the NDP would have no say? I’d say big nope.
 

Dixie Cup

Senate Member
Sep 16, 2006
5,666
3,547
113
Edmonton
Federal Environment Minister Stephen Guilbeault, whose press secretary told the CBC:
“We welcome the NDP’s bill to the House. Advertisement has a big role to play in public perception, and the industry is racking in record profits. We will carefully assess their bill and look forward to productive debates and discussions around this important issue.”

OMG they're actually considering g it. Don't know why I'm surprised