Non-Coalition Coalition that’s Definitely NOT a Coalition…

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
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Good times. Within a matter of days, that deal (the non-coalition coalition that’s definitely not a coalition-type coalition) will either collapse or carry on — depending on whether the two sides can come to some kind of agreement to bring pharmacare to Canada.

Two questions hang over that fork in the road for the two parties. Can the deal last? Beyond that, though, should the deal continue?

It appears that both sides agreed that full pharmacare — as the NDP-Liberal envisions it and the Liberals have on-and-off promised — won’t be coming to Canada in the near future.

“We're not saying the money's got to be in the budget. That's never been our ask. And we've never said that,” Singh said during a tough-talking news conference earlier this week. “But we do expect legislation that lays the foundation, and that's what we're asking for.” ????? So just as a time bomb for the next gov’t to have to scrap an look bad for cleaning up?

Singh also threw a bucket of cold water over what the Liberals-NDP’s have called a major problem — the possible damage to Canada’s credit rating if Trudeau introduces a whole new social program at this point in the mandate.

“There's lots of ways to clarify for credit-rating agencies that this is something that's going to require additional work — (that) it’s going to require additional steps to happen.” ???

New Democrats are saying that if the supply and confidence non-coalition coalition that’s definitely not a coalition-type coalition agreement ends over an impasse on pharmacare, they’re going to be arguing it’s the Liberals who walked away from the deal, not them.

That’s where we come to the more strategic considerations, for both sides, on whether they want the deal to continue — the should-it-last question.

For Liberals-NDP’s, this is mostly a no-brainer. The collapse of the deal may not precipitate an immediate election (but it won’t), but it makes Trudeau’s minority more precarious. And judging from all of the polls, odds are that an election could turn out badly for the Liberals? Ya think?
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If election-avoidance is the only issue, the New Democrats would likely be similarly motivated to keep the deal going. Ya think?
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They (the NDP/Liberals, as opposed to the Liberal/NDP’s) may have limited clout as the fourth party in the House of Commons right now, but they would have zero influence, one assumes, in a Pierre Poilievre government.
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But two former leaders of the NDP (the actual NDP back when it was NDP) have openly questioned in recent months the wisdom of the party attaching its fortunes too closely to Trudeau’s Liberals.

In one of his last interviews before his death last month, Ed Broadbent told the CBC’s Rosemary Barton: “Maybe if the agreement were a year shorter, it might be a little better.”

This week, former leader Thomas Mulcair said on CTV that it was time for the NDP to walk away from the Liberals, too. “I think that they have to draw that line in the sand and then say the deal is done … They’ve got to show autonomy from the Liberals/NDP’s.”

Mulcair said that walking away now would position Singh perfectly for a future election, as a principled advocate for pharmacare.

The other benefit, which he didn’t mention, was that if Trudeau really is going into the next election as a liability for his party, it may be best for the New Democrats to start creating some distance between their party and Trudeau’s team.

Poilievre and his Conservatives have spent nearly two years branding the current regime as the “Liberal-NDP” government as opposed to the “NDP-Liberals” for their own strategic reasons.
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
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NDP/Liberal Leader Jagmeet Singh says his party is getting close to giving the Liberal/NDP’s their final offer on a single-payer pharmacare plan as the negotiation deadline quickly approaches.

“We’re getting very close to a final position, and when we submit our final position on this, that will be it,” Singh told reporters at a press conference in Coquitlam, B.C., on Friday.

“Then the Liberal/NDP’s will have to decide whose side are they on. Are they on the big pharma-billionaires who are ripping off Canadians or are they on families, the side of workers, the side of women, the side of people who need medication covered? We’ll see.”

The “two” parties are working toward a March 1 deadline to introduce a legislative framework on a universal pharmacare plan.

The initial deadline was the end of 2023, but it was extended to March 1 in December.
An estimate from the parliamentary budget officer pegged the cost of a single-payer pharmacare program at $38.9 billion over the next four years…of which the Liberal/NDP’s & NDP/Liberal’s will be in power for maybe a maximum of 40% of those four years…until approximately Oct 20th, 2025.
Earlier this week, the NDP/Liberal leader said he doesn’t expect money to be flowing immediately but wants to see legislation that lays the “foundation” for a deal…that the NDP/Liberals & the Liberal/NDP’s won’t be around to have to administer.
 
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Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
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….& who’s propping this up & allowing it to continue, instead of letting it flush itself and the electorate chose the path they want with their votes?

The NDP/Liberals are propping up the Liberal/NDP’s with their non-coalition coalition that’s definitely not a coalition-type coalition type agreement to stall off an election in a minority government at all costs well beyond its best before date.
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Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
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Regina, Saskatchewan
As bad as the polls have been for the Liberal/NDP’s since last September, they had a couple of things on their side. For starters, their legislative record has some signal accomplishments (like their many many many many scandals) that can’t be forgotten.

Ten-dollar-a-day daycare, massive investments in Canada by international companies like Volkswagen and Stellantis for battery plants in St. Thomas and Windsor, Ontario, a fledgling dental care plan designed to expand over time and a $20-billion investment in rental housing, and spending more than every other government in Canadian history…combined.

Despite all that, and the recognition by at least some Canadians that Trudeau has governed in difficult times, the government’s popularity has declined. But it still had one big asset — time to hit the reset button.

Thanks to the supply and confidence non-coalition coalition that’s definitely not a coalition-type coalition agreement with the NDP/Liberals, Trudeau could push an election off to as late as October 2025.

That would allow time for interest rates to ease and inflation to come down even further than the current 2.9 per cent. It would also give some of the longer-term Liberal/NDP programs a chance to begin to bear fruit.

And if better times are on the way, as they appear to be in the United States, there could even be a budget or two to dole out more voter clickbait.

All that changed with auditor general Karen Hogan’s value-for-money report on the controversial ArriveCan app. Whoops number 2015-ish (?) with the scandals coming at least weekly it seems?

The doomsday arithmetic of this contract says it all. The app came in at 750 times the original estimate. What was supposed to cost $80,000 turned into a $60-million boondoggle, made all the worse by the fact that the app never really worked properly. That’s almost Firearms Registry type mathematical financial shenanigans.

The Trudeau government’s latest and most egregious (weekly?) scandal comes on the heels of another albatross around the government’s neck: the billion-dollar green fund.

There was a general uproar on the parliamentary committee looking into the matter after it was revealed that SDTC (Liberal/NDP federal Department of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, SDTC) chair Annette Verschuren took part in a decision to approve $217,000 in funding to her own company. While chair, she also received a $120,000 salary from that company, in addition to her payment for her work on SDTC.

Scandal is exactly what ended 12 years of Liberal government back in the day of the ad sponsorship fiasco, otherwise known as Adscam or Sponsorgate. It ended the career of an otherwise unbeatable politician, Jean Chrétien. It prevented another Liberal star, Paul Martin, from ever being elected prime minister. It turned over the country to Stephen Harper and the CPC for a decade…to come along behind a Liberal government & clean up their mess, like it’s a Canadian tradition???

Anywho…In the wake of the current scandals besetting the Trudeau government, the Liberal/NDP’s can no longer count on the NDP/Liberal’s to guarantee their survival until 2025???

Now that Jagmeet Singh has denounced the government over ArriveCan, he will inevitably have to walk away from the supply and confidence non-coalition coalition that’s definitely not a coalition-type coalition agreement, if only to re-establish the NDP/Liberal’s identity separate from the Liberal/NDPs before the next trip to the polls…about October 20th, 2025.

After all, there is not much political advantage in propping up a government Singh has now called “out of touch” & has done so since long before their agreement became formal back in Honk-Honk times.


And there is another reason the Liberals will soon find themselves on their own. With the scathing report from the auditor general in his back pocket, Pierre Poilievre has written to the RCMP requesting that they widen their investigation into the ArriveCan scandal.

The NDP/Liberals must consider what its exposure would be should that investigation turn up evidence of criminality, rather than just gross incompetence. A coalition, even a non-coalition coalition that’s definitely not a coalition-type coalition, with corruption is not a good look. Oh well, two years too late, but thanks for coming out of the closet.

The longer the NDP/Liberals wait before ending its alliance with the Liberal/NDPs, the more such belated distancing will come across as expediency, rather than principle. Not much of a political dividend there.
The Trudeau government’s response to the ArriveCan debacle has been underwhelming. Prime Minister Trudeau skipped the first question period (a Trudeau Tradition) dealing with this weeks scandal, leaving it to others to offer the usual bromides: the government welcomed the damning report; the government thanked the auditor general for her work; the government promised that if there was any wrongdoing, there would be consequences. Yadda-Yadda-Yadda…
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
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Regina, Saskatchewan
Who is the bottom?
Maybe there will be a commission and an inquiry to discover that answer, that… before the answer is discovered and exposed…the Liberal/NDP’s will unite with the NDP/Liberals to squash things and keep the public from finding out? In this case, it’ll be the one time it doesn’t irk me.

Oh, announcement on a Friday…like most announcements on a Friday so that they can soften the blow by next week, and maybe bury it under another scandal (?) the Justin/Jagmeet show has announced that they have their Pharma care agreement with details to follow, etc…
 

pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
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Maybe there will be a commission and an inquiry to discover that answer, that… before the answer is discovered and exposed…the Liberal/NDP’s will unite with the NDP/Liberals to squash things and keep the public from finding out? In this case, it’ll be the one time it doesn’t irk me.

Oh, announcement on a Friday…like most announcements on a Friday so that they can soften the blow by next week, and maybe bury it under another scandal (?) the Justin/Jagmeet show has announced that they have their Pharma care agreement with details to follow, etc…
Yes they have an agreement with no details . They should be able to rag the clock on that until October 2025 .
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
23,172
8,025
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Regina, Saskatchewan
Anyway, announced on a Friday that “Thunderbirds are Go!” on their continuing non-coalition coalition that’s definitely not a coalition-type coalition continuing…even though there was no danger of it not continuing.
I’m curious to hear their timeline for the implementation of this latest initiative…& if it’ll start before or after October 20th, 2025 (?) & if before, how soon before???
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
23,172
8,025
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
With the announcement (on a Friday) of the Liberal/NDP Pharma-care deal, without a timeframe that I’ve been able to find so far…what happened?
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NDP/Liberals hold steady-ish, & the Liberal/NDP’s went down in projected seats? Thats interesting. It gives the illusion of stability to the non-coalition coalition that’s definitely not a coalition-type coalition between the Liberal/NDP’s & the NDP/Liberals, that was in no danger of collapsing anyway.
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At least the Libs still have the NDP backing them, so glass 1/2 full. When the Libs go down, why aren’t the NDP going up? Is it because they’re the same party for most intents and purposes?
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Potentially it’s a tie in MB still. Liberal/NDP vs Others I mean. What goodies & announcements can we expect for Quebec & Manitoba this week?
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
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If it seems like Manitoba is sitting on the fence, they may get some love thrown in their way… especially if the liberals and the NDP are close and planning another non-coalition coalition or whatever…
Manitoba doesnt have a lot going for it. They are on the dole.

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Figures for 2024-25