Kelly McParland: How decades of Liberal indifference created Danielle Smith

The_Foxer

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Well... not entirely wrong that's for sure. It is probably true that albertans demand more respect than they SHOULD get, and get less respect than they deserve.

Many think the feds make most of their money from alberta oil, which is no where remotely close to true. A large percent think somehow that albertans pay more into "equalization". This is false, equalization is paid from taxes and they pay the same tax rate as everyone else.

At the same time they're a "have" province that draws less in gov't transfers and money overall than most provinces, the success of their people means they normally pay higher than average income taxes due to their higher than average incomes and oil is an important strategic and economic resource that keeps our dollar stronger and such.

And alberta does get dumped on. Trudeau before getting elected said westerners and albertans were unfit to lead the country and it 'doesn't work' when they're allowed to try. The NEP was a horrid disaster for a generation of younger albertans. Alberta culture and heritage is utterly ignored other than to occasionally show up at a stampede.

So... this probably is the inevitalbe result which is a shame because it's the last thing alberta needs to be focused on right now.
 
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pgs

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The only thing Alberta should be focused on is readying for the eventual break up of Canada . Actually all provinces should be . If the last four years have taught us anything it is that Canada is irreparably broken .
 
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The_Foxer

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Well there's not really enough support for that right now even in Alberta. Which is surprising, i would have thought it would be at an all time high. Which i guess is why Smith is going for 'separation lite' as her pitch
 

pgs

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Well there's not really enough support for that right now even in Alberta. Which is surprising, i would have thought it would be at an all time high. Which i guess is why Smith is going for 'separation lite' as her pitch
It is no longer a matter of support , it is a matter of protecting when we come apart at the seams .
 
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Ron in Regina

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Meh….someone’s gotta bite on this thread. Here’s something I stumbled upon this morning in an Eastern Newspaper with an Eastern perspective (outside looking in):

For decades, a common lament in Alberta and Saskatchewan was the special treatment given to Quebec by the Confederation process.

It wasn’t just the equalization funds. It was everything that seemingly allowed the province to operate as its own entity within Canada. This was completely unfair, Alberta’s politicians railed for years. If Quebec didn’t like being part of Canada the way it was, then it should just bloody well leave, many in the Prairies screamed.

Well, times have changed. Now it’s Alberta and Saskatchewan’s turn to demand special treatment, vowing to solidify powers and authority over their provinces in a way we haven’t seen before. This portends extremely difficult times for the country.

In Alberta’s case, it started under Premier Jason Kenney, elected in 2019 on a promise to explore the ways in which his province could become more independent from the rest of Canada. He touted ideas such as creating an independent police force and pension plan. He oversaw a referendum on equalization.

Alas, he wouldn’t get a chance to realize his dreams because his own party quashed them by quashing him – or at least his leadership. Never fear, however, because the front-runner to replace him has even an even bolder vision.

By now, most have heard about Danielle Smith’s plan to introduce the Alberta Sovereignty Act as the first order of business upon being sworn in as premier, if she is elected the new leader of the United Conservative Party in October. This is a proposed law that says the Alberta government will effectively ignore any federal edict it believes is not in the best interests of the province.

While it has been written off by constitutional experts across the country as madness and, well, quite unconstitutional, Ms. Smith has since doubled down. In a recent op-ed, she argued that over the years, Alberta has tried to make it work with Ottawa only to be met with “a lawless federal government invading our jurisdiction.”

Presumably, this was not a problem during those years when a Conservative government was running the country. This lawlessness only runs rampant, we are to gather, when the Liberals are in charge – specifically, a Trudeau.

Next door in Saskatchewan, Premier Scott Moe has also declared war with Ottawa. Last November, the Premier said his government wanted to make the province “a nation within a nation” – borrowing language often associated with Quebec independence.

Mr. Moe’s Saskatchewan Party government has been conducting consultations throughout the summer on the “future of Canada’s economic sovereignty.” As part of this venture, it is looking into the ways in which Ottawa intrudes on Saskatchewan’s jurisdiction.


Anyone who thinks this is a joke should be disabused of this notion immediately. Just this week, the Saskatchewan government accused officials from the federal Ministry of Environment and Climate Change of trespassing on private property while taking water samples – something the department has been doing across the country for 50 years.

Mr. Moe’s cabinet even amended and later approved a change to the provincial trespassing laws. An addition was made that states a “person” caught trespassing can now include “the Crown in the right of Canada.” The “trespassers” in this case were federal water scientists taking a sample near a highway in Pense, Sask., while conducting pesticide testing.

It’s difficult not to be cynical about all this woe-is-me business coming out of Alberta and Saskatchewan these days. It’s not like they’ve been barely scraping by under the Constitutional rules as they are. Alberta has been an economic powerhouse for decades, even during oil’s down years. Saskatchewan has also enjoyed the bounty that high resource prices can bestow on a jurisdiction that has them. Both have been the economic envy of other provinces for years.

This is really about politics, about getting back at Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his Liberal government. This would not be happening if Stephen Harper was still the prime minister. Not a chance. And if Pierre Poilievre ever becomes prime minister, and Ms. Smith becomes premier, and Mr. Moe continues to serve as one, all this nation-inside-a-nation stuff will become nothing more than a soft murmur.

Still, it would be folly to write this all off as political nonsense we shouldn’t take seriously. We should. There are unquestionably tough times ahead that will test the mettle of this country. I don’t discount the possibility of irreparable harm being done.

Mr. Moe and Ms. Smith are deluding themselves if they think their perceived problems will disappear with Ottawa out of their lives.

It won’t fix anything. In fact, they will almost assuredly discover they didn’t have it so bad after all.
 

Tecumsehsbones

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Mar 18, 2013
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Meh….someone’s gotta bite on this thread. Here’s something I stumbled upon this morning in an Eastern Newspaper with an Eastern perspective (outside looking in):

For decades, a common lament in Alberta and Saskatchewan was the special treatment given to Quebec by the Confederation process.

It wasn’t just the equalization funds. It was everything that seemingly allowed the province to operate as its own entity within Canada. This was completely unfair, Alberta’s politicians railed for years. If Quebec didn’t like being part of Canada the way it was, then it should just bloody well leave, many in the Prairies screamed.

Well, times have changed. Now it’s Alberta and Saskatchewan’s turn to demand special treatment, vowing to solidify powers and authority over their provinces in a way we haven’t seen before. This portends extremely difficult times for the country.

In Alberta’s case, it started under Premier Jason Kenney, elected in 2019 on a promise to explore the ways in which his province could become more independent from the rest of Canada. He touted ideas such as creating an independent police force and pension plan. He oversaw a referendum on equalization.

Alas, he wouldn’t get a chance to realize his dreams because his own party quashed them by quashing him – or at least his leadership. Never fear, however, because the front-runner to replace him has even an even bolder vision.

By now, most have heard about Danielle Smith’s plan to introduce the Alberta Sovereignty Act as the first order of business upon being sworn in as premier, if she is elected the new leader of the United Conservative Party in October. This is a proposed law that says the Alberta government will effectively ignore any federal edict it believes is not in the best interests of the province.

While it has been written off by constitutional experts across the country as madness and, well, quite unconstitutional, Ms. Smith has since doubled down. In a recent op-ed, she argued that over the years, Alberta has tried to make it work with Ottawa only to be met with “a lawless federal government invading our jurisdiction.”

Presumably, this was not a problem during those years when a Conservative government was running the country. This lawlessness only runs rampant, we are to gather, when the Liberals are in charge – specifically, a Trudeau.

Next door in Saskatchewan, Premier Scott Moe has also declared war with Ottawa. Last November, the Premier said his government wanted to make the province “a nation within a nation” – borrowing language often associated with Quebec independence.

Mr. Moe’s Saskatchewan Party government has been conducting consultations throughout the summer on the “future of Canada’s economic sovereignty.” As part of this venture, it is looking into the ways in which Ottawa intrudes on Saskatchewan’s jurisdiction.


Anyone who thinks this is a joke should be disabused of this notion immediately. Just this week, the Saskatchewan government accused officials from the federal Ministry of Environment and Climate Change of trespassing on private property while taking water samples – something the department has been doing across the country for 50 years.

Mr. Moe’s cabinet even amended and later approved a change to the provincial trespassing laws. An addition was made that states a “person” caught trespassing can now include “the Crown in the right of Canada.” The “trespassers” in this case were federal water scientists taking a sample near a highway in Pense, Sask., while conducting pesticide testing.

It’s difficult not to be cynical about all this woe-is-me business coming out of Alberta and Saskatchewan these days. It’s not like they’ve been barely scraping by under the Constitutional rules as they are. Alberta has been an economic powerhouse for decades, even during oil’s down years. Saskatchewan has also enjoyed the bounty that high resource prices can bestow on a jurisdiction that has them. Both have been the economic envy of other provinces for years.

This is really about politics, about getting back at Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his Liberal government. This would not be happening if Stephen Harper was still the prime minister. Not a chance. And if Pierre Poilievre ever becomes prime minister, and Ms. Smith becomes premier, and Mr. Moe continues to serve as one, all this nation-inside-a-nation stuff will become nothing more than a soft murmur.

Still, it would be folly to write this all off as political nonsense we shouldn’t take seriously. We should. There are unquestionably tough times ahead that will test the mettle of this country. I don’t discount the possibility of irreparable harm being done.

Mr. Moe and Ms. Smith are deluding themselves if they think their perceived problems will disappear with Ottawa out of their lives.

It won’t fix anything. In fact, they will almost assuredly discover they didn’t have it so bad after all.
Well, I certainly hope THIS kind of thinking doesn't get traction!

I've got my popcorn ready to go for the Canadian Civil War.
 

The_Foxer

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In Alberta’s case, it started under Premier Jason Kenney,

This article is wrong in a large number of places. First off - this did NOT begin with Kenney. Hell - harper himself co-wrote the Alberta Firewall document before he even became prime minister.

The "lawlessness" issue isn't just under trudeau. In fact - seperation sentiment right now is LOWER than it was at the end of the chretien/ martin years. Back then even BC had had enough, polling damn near 50 percent in favour of seperation, which was higher than alberta's polling at the time.

So, the snide remark that it's all about punishing trudeau is completely indefensible.

The claim that we should ignore alberta and saskatchewan's complaints because they're financially not 'scraping by' is wrong on several fronts - the first being that people have rights regardless of whether or not they're doing well - it's still "theft" if you steal from a rich person vs a poor person, But most of all Quebec has enjoyed HUGE prosperity under our system and we listen to them all the time.

And lets not forget about the absolute STUPIDITY of wringing "This is a very serious issue" and following it with "We should just ignore the crybabies." If it's a serious issue you should be calling on the feds to work with the provinces to address these concerns. If all you're going to do is dismiss it as a bunch of crybaby farmers, then don't expect us to take it seriously.

Having said that by embarking on this the province is forgetting two things: The REASON that quebec has more power than alberta is that it's got twice as many seats. Even after the new allocations, alberta will have 37 seats compared to quebec's 78. There's 343 seats out there now - so a federal gov't can afford to ignore alberta entirely if it wants. Ignoring quebec is a little harder.

Even alberta and sask between them only have 51 seats. That's a little more weighty but it's still not a game change.

So what alberta and sask SHOULD be doing is working on an alliance with ALL the western provinces - or at least BC, AB and SASK. A "Western Confederaton" would have a total of 94 seats behind them - THAT gets a lot harder to ignore. THAT is a powerful lobbying group as far as votes go. If you added manitoba you'd be at a full third of the votes. Nobody can afford to ignore that. But even without manitoba you'd still be pretty damn hard to ignore.

And the people of BC have risen up against the Feds every bit as much as alberta has over the years - even going 3 years without transfer payments in the 90's over a dispute. Getting them on board with more power to the provinces wouldn't actually be that hard.

But alberta focuses on going alone and in the last 2 decades has actually tried to be hostile with BC for unknown reasons.

A united "western Canada soverignty' political alliance or council of the three provincial gov'ts could force a lot of real change.
 

pgs

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This article is wrong in a large number of places. First off - this did NOT begin with Kenney. Hell - harper himself co-wrote the Alberta Firewall document before he even became prime minister.

The "lawlessness" issue isn't just under trudeau. In fact - seperation sentiment right now is LOWER than it was at the end of the chretien/ martin years. Back then even BC had had enough, polling damn near 50 percent in favour of seperation, which was higher than alberta's polling at the time.

So, the snide remark that it's all about punishing trudeau is completely indefensible.

The claim that we should ignore alberta and saskatchewan's complaints because they're financially not 'scraping by' is wrong on several fronts - the first being that people have rights regardless of whether or not they're doing well - it's still "theft" if you steal from a rich person vs a poor person, But most of all Quebec has enjoyed HUGE prosperity under our system and we listen to them all the time.

And lets not forget about the absolute STUPIDITY of wringing "This is a very serious issue" and following it with "We should just ignore the crybabies." If it's a serious issue you should be calling on the feds to work with the provinces to address these concerns. If all you're going to do is dismiss it as a bunch of crybaby farmers, then don't expect us to take it seriously.

Having said that by embarking on this the province is forgetting two things: The REASON that quebec has more power than alberta is that it's got twice as many seats. Even after the new allocations, alberta will have 37 seats compared to quebec's 78. There's 343 seats out there now - so a federal gov't can afford to ignore alberta entirely if it wants. Ignoring quebec is a little harder.

Even alberta and sask between them only have 51 seats. That's a little more weighty but it's still not a game change.

So what alberta and sask SHOULD be doing is working on an alliance with ALL the western provinces - or at least BC, AB and SASK. A "Western Confederaton" would have a total of 94 seats behind them - THAT gets a lot harder to ignore. THAT is a powerful lobbying group as far as votes go. If you added manitoba you'd be at a full third of the votes. Nobody can afford to ignore that. But even without manitoba you'd still be pretty damn hard to ignore.

And the people of BC have risen up against the Feds every bit as much as alberta has over the years - even going 3 years without transfer payments in the 90's over a dispute. Getting them on board with more power to the provinces wouldn't actually be that hard.

But alberta focuses on going alone and in the last 2 decades has actually tried to be hostile with BC for unknown reasons.

A united "western Canada soverignty' political alliance or council of the three provincial gov'ts could force a lot of real change.
B.C. does not want to play .
 
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Jinentonix

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Sep 6, 2015
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Meh….someone’s gotta bite on this thread. Here’s something I stumbled upon this morning in an Eastern Newspaper with an Eastern perspective (outside looking in):

For decades, a common lament in Alberta and Saskatchewan was the special treatment given to Quebec by the Confederation process.

It wasn’t just the equalization funds. It was everything that seemingly allowed the province to operate as its own entity within Canada. This was completely unfair, Alberta’s politicians railed for years. If Quebec didn’t like being part of Canada the way it was, then it should just bloody well leave, many in the Prairies screamed.

Well, times have changed. Now it’s Alberta and Saskatchewan’s turn to demand special treatment, vowing to solidify powers and authority over their provinces in a way we haven’t seen before. This portends extremely difficult times for the country.

In Alberta’s case, it started under Premier Jason Kenney, elected in 2019 on a promise to explore the ways in which his province could become more independent from the rest of Canada. He touted ideas such as creating an independent police force and pension plan. He oversaw a referendum on equalization.

Alas, he wouldn’t get a chance to realize his dreams because his own party quashed them by quashing him – or at least his leadership. Never fear, however, because the front-runner to replace him has even an even bolder vision.

By now, most have heard about Danielle Smith’s plan to introduce the Alberta Sovereignty Act as the first order of business upon being sworn in as premier, if she is elected the new leader of the United Conservative Party in October. This is a proposed law that says the Alberta government will effectively ignore any federal edict it believes is not in the best interests of the province.

While it has been written off by constitutional experts across the country as madness and, well, quite unconstitutional, Ms. Smith has since doubled down. In a recent op-ed, she argued that over the years, Alberta has tried to make it work with Ottawa only to be met with “a lawless federal government invading our jurisdiction.”

Presumably, this was not a problem during those years when a Conservative government was running the country. This lawlessness only runs rampant, we are to gather, when the Liberals are in charge – specifically, a Trudeau.

Next door in Saskatchewan, Premier Scott Moe has also declared war with Ottawa. Last November, the Premier said his government wanted to make the province “a nation within a nation” – borrowing language often associated with Quebec independence.

Mr. Moe’s Saskatchewan Party government has been conducting consultations throughout the summer on the “future of Canada’s economic sovereignty.” As part of this venture, it is looking into the ways in which Ottawa intrudes on Saskatchewan’s jurisdiction.


Anyone who thinks this is a joke should be disabused of this notion immediately. Just this week, the Saskatchewan government accused officials from the federal Ministry of Environment and Climate Change of trespassing on private property while taking water samples – something the department has been doing across the country for 50 years.

Mr. Moe’s cabinet even amended and later approved a change to the provincial trespassing laws. An addition was made that states a “person” caught trespassing can now include “the Crown in the right of Canada.” The “trespassers” in this case were federal water scientists taking a sample near a highway in Pense, Sask., while conducting pesticide testing.

It’s difficult not to be cynical about all this woe-is-me business coming out of Alberta and Saskatchewan these days. It’s not like they’ve been barely scraping by under the Constitutional rules as they are. Alberta has been an economic powerhouse for decades, even during oil’s down years. Saskatchewan has also enjoyed the bounty that high resource prices can bestow on a jurisdiction that has them. Both have been the economic envy of other provinces for years.

This is really about politics, about getting back at Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his Liberal government. This would not be happening if Stephen Harper was still the prime minister. Not a chance. And if Pierre Poilievre ever becomes prime minister, and Ms. Smith becomes premier, and Mr. Moe continues to serve as one, all this nation-inside-a-nation stuff will become nothing more than a soft murmur.

Still, it would be folly to write this all off as political nonsense we shouldn’t take seriously. We should. There are unquestionably tough times ahead that will test the mettle of this country. I don’t discount the possibility of irreparable harm being done.

Mr. Moe and Ms. Smith are deluding themselves if they think their perceived problems will disappear with Ottawa out of their lives.

It won’t fix anything. In fact, they will almost assuredly discover they didn’t have it so bad after all.
As a near life-long resident of Ontario, that sure ain't the way I see it. Nor do I blame it all on Groper. Mulroney was no friend of any province that wasn't Quebec.
No, Alberta and SK have valid grievances that successive govts (with one exception) have by and large ignored. The big one is O&G. The govt, both currently and previously as the Official Opposition has done what it can to hem in Alberta oil. Yet Quebec's refining sector has been largely untouched and now this govt has approved a deep sea drilling project of the East Coast.

The problem goes wider. Successive govts have eaten away at provincial sovereignty while downloading their own responsibilities onto organizations that aren't elected and aren't answerable to the taxpayer, ie: the UN, the WEF, the courts and human rights tribunals.

Meanwhile Quebec has effectively separated from Canada while maintaining enough "association" that they can virtually dictate the direction Canada goes in.
But yeah, Western Canada are just a bunch of whiners.
 

Serryah

Senate Member
Dec 3, 2008
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As a near life-long resident of Ontario, that sure ain't the way I see it. Nor do I blame it all on Groper. Mulroney was no friend of any province that wasn't Quebec.
No, Alberta and SK have valid grievances that successive govts (with one exception) have by and large ignored. The big one is O&G. The govt, both currently and previously as the Official Opposition has done what it can to hem in Alberta oil. Yet Quebec's refining sector has been largely untouched and now this govt has approved a deep sea drilling project of the East Coast.

The problem goes wider. Successive govts have eaten away at provincial sovereignty while downloading their own responsibilities onto organizations that aren't elected and aren't answerable to the taxpayer, ie: the UN, the WEF, the courts and human rights tribunals.

Meanwhile Quebec has effectively separated from Canada while maintaining enough "association" that they can virtually dictate the direction Canada goes in.
But yeah, Western Canada are just a bunch of whiners.

You know Hell has frozen when I agree with Jin, for the most part.

And, TBH, I think what Quebec is doing now, gradually, is to separate as much of itself as it can from the rest of Canada (kind'a like how some states in the south US are trying), without actually breaking away and starting a counter protest like before.

And no, the West aren't the only provinces to "see" this. There's very little like/love for Quebec on the eastern side of it, either, and in NB it's strained as hell if only because of our OWN French issues.

Perhaps combining regions - not just the West but us here in the East, would be the best way to handle the power house that is Quebec and Ontario. At least a combined effort would put is in a more fighting change. And considering how many from the East go to work in the West - and either stay or sometimes return - there may just be more alliances made that way than not.

If the attitude were to change at least.
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
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Well, I certainly hope THIS kind of thinking doesn't get traction!

I've got my popcorn ready to go for the Canadian Civil War.
Don’t worry. It’s Western Canada. If things even look remotely serious (Honk-Honk), Trudeau will unleash the Emergencies Act faster that you can figure out how to pronounce “ Poutine“ backwards…
 

The_Foxer

House Member
Aug 9, 2022
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En-EET-oop.

What, will the Men of Westernesse not stand for the Seven Stars, Seven Stones, and One White Tree?

This is how y'all lost Numenor. Pussies.
We used to just summon a few eagles to deal with the mess but now they're on the 'at risk' species list and ... well..
 

The_Foxer

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70 years of experience gives one perspective .
I question your experience. In fact at many times bc has polled higher in favour of seperation than alberta. Not to mention the fact that bc's population has a HELL of a lot of albertans in it. BC is the only province that has more people moving TO it from alberta than are going from it to alberta. BC has gotten into serious fights with Ottawa at least as often as Alberta and won more than a few. British columbians are not more happy about the fact that the prime minister is often decided at least by minority before the polls close in manitoba.

And this is the problem. Rather than thinking it through or actually looking at what makes sense all together too many Albertans make weird assumptions and stick to ideology. Lets be honest - they must KNOW sask would likely go but they rarely reach out to them either. And despite the fact that bc has actually been very good neighbours and been in fights with ottawa and polled positively for seperation they assume for some insane reason bc would never go for it.

If alberta was serious about it's problems it would be working day and night to set up a western conference to present a united front, but they'd rather stomp their feet than roll up their sleeves and so nobody takes them seriously.
 

pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
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I question your experience. In fact at many times bc has polled higher in favour of seperation than alberta. Not to mention the fact that bc's population has a HELL of a lot of albertans in it. BC is the only province that has more people moving TO it from alberta than are going from it to alberta. BC has gotten into serious fights with Ottawa at least as often as Alberta and won more than a few. British columbians are not more happy about the fact that the prime minister is often decided at least by minority before the polls close in manitoba.

And this is the problem. Rather than thinking it through or actually looking at what makes sense all together too many Albertans make weird assumptions and stick to ideology. Lets be honest - they must KNOW sask would likely go but they rarely reach out to them either. And despite the fact that bc has actually been very good neighbours and been in fights with ottawa and polled positively for seperation they assume for some insane reason bc would never go for it.

If alberta was serious about it's problems it would be working day and night to set up a western conference to present a united front, but they'd rather stomp their feet than roll up their sleeves and so nobody takes them seriously.
That’s great , but the lower mainland and southern Vancouver Island are solidly behind confederation . There is support for separation in the North and central areas of the province . I do agree that we in the west should band together to counter Ottawa . I also believe the western provinces , all provinces for that matter , should be preparing for the inevitable break up of Canada . But that is just me.
 

Taxslave2

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Aug 13, 2022
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This article is wrong in a large number of places. First off - this did NOT begin with Kenney. Hell - harper himself co-wrote the Alberta Firewall document before he even became prime minister.

The "lawlessness" issue isn't just under trudeau. In fact - seperation sentiment right now is LOWER than it was at the end of the chretien/ martin years. Back then even BC had had enough, polling damn near 50 percent in favour of seperation, which was higher than alberta's polling at the time.

So, the snide remark that it's all about punishing trudeau is completely indefensible.

The claim that we should ignore alberta and saskatchewan's complaints because they're financially not 'scraping by' is wrong on several fronts - the first being that people have rights regardless of whether or not they're doing well - it's still "theft" if you steal from a rich person vs a poor person, But most of all Quebec has enjoyed HUGE prosperity under our system and we listen to them all the time.

And lets not forget about the absolute STUPIDITY of wringing "This is a very serious issue" and following it with "We should just ignore the crybabies." If it's a serious issue you should be calling on the feds to work with the provinces to address these concerns. If all you're going to do is dismiss it as a bunch of crybaby farmers, then don't expect us to take it seriously.

Having said that by embarking on this the province is forgetting two things: The REASON that quebec has more power than alberta is that it's got twice as many seats. Even after the new allocations, alberta will have 37 seats compared to quebec's 78. There's 343 seats out there now - so a federal gov't can afford to ignore alberta entirely if it wants. Ignoring quebec is a little harder.

Even alberta and sask between them only have 51 seats. That's a little more weighty but it's still not a game change.

So what alberta and sask SHOULD be doing is working on an alliance with ALL the western provinces - or at least BC, AB and SASK. A "Western Confederaton" would have a total of 94 seats behind them - THAT gets a lot harder to ignore. THAT is a powerful lobbying group as far as votes go. If you added manitoba you'd be at a full third of the votes. Nobody can afford to ignore that. But even without manitoba you'd still be pretty damn hard to ignore.

And the people of BC have risen up against the Feds every bit as much as alberta has over the years - even going 3 years without transfer payments in the 90's over a dispute. Getting them on board with more power to the provinces wouldn't actually be that hard.

But alberta focuses on going alone and in the last 2 decades has actually tried to be hostile with BC for unknown reasons.

A united "western Canada soverignty' political alliance or council of the three provincial gov'ts could force a lot of real change.
Unfortunately, the wet coast is so infested with extreme lefties, a Union with more advanced provinces is not going to happen in the foreseeable future. They are so far out of touch with reality, they actually believe socialism is a good thing and globull warming is a fact.