It's Official: Solar Is the Cheapest Electricity in History

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
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Moccasin Flats
Three Gorges Dam has the solar industry beat by itself. Heard it from the top that "water can be counted on". Also greener than the solar panel business.
3 Gorges dam is failing. A big ol mess isnt far off.

The big China disaster that you're missing​

  • This aerial photo taken on Aug. 23 shows water being released from China's Three Gorges Dam in Yichang, Hubei province. | AFP-JIJI This aerial photo taken on Aug. 23 shows water being released from China's Three Gorges Dam in Yichang, Hubei province. | AFP-JIJI
The world’s largest dam is under pressure in the massive flooding that’s wiping away billions of dollars of value in China. The predicament symbolizes a looming crisis for Beijing. Climate change is bringing more frequent and intense deluges that threaten the economic heartland, and infrastructure defenses installed with the disasters of previous eras in mind can’t keep up. There’s very little time to prepare for what’s coming.
The problem isn’t that China lacks water management projects. It has built hundreds of thousands of levees, dikes, reservoirs and dams on its seven major river systems. But many are struggling to cope with months of rain-fed flooding that has ravaged vast swathes of industrial and agricultural land and engulfed millions of homes. This past week, officials feared that the Three Gorges Dam on the mighty Yangtze was peaking and could overflow. Elsewhere, authorities have blown up barriers that were causing more damage than help.



China has experienced three of the world’s 10 most devastating floods since 1950. The limited number of deaths this time is a testament to how far the country has come, with officials saying that at least 219 people have died or disappeared. Yet flooding in cities is getting worse, a sign of rising populations and failure to execute urbanization policies.
Annual average losses from river inundations are the highest in the world. Flood policy hasn’t been made the a priority it should be given the high stakes. The Yangtze River Economic Belt is home to more than 40 percent of China’s population (about 600 million people) and accounts for almost 50 percent of export value and 45 percent of gross domestic product, according to China Water Risk. On its own, the region could be the third-largest economy in the world.

More severe disasters are anticipated. Hydroclimatologist Peter Gleick, a member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, told the South China Morning Post that climate change is increasing the risks of extreme rainfall events, making it “even more likely that dams like the Three Gorges will be unable to prevent the worst flooding from occurring in the future.”
A study has found that if temperatures rise by 2 degrees, flows around the Yangtze and other major world rivers will intensify, increasing the frequency of huge floods. Heavy rain days are already more numerous and intense inside cities compared to suburban areas along the Yangtze, a study using rainfall records over two periods between 1961 and 2010 found. Such days increase by 30 percent on average in places like Suzhou, near Shanghai, known for wedding gowns and bridal exports along with big tech factories.

China isn’t shy about deploying money. Last year, 726 billion yuan ($105 billion) was shoveled into water conservancy construction — the highest in history, according to CLSA Securities Ltd. Flood management has received 1.2 billion yuan in central government funds since the beginning of the rainy season. But there’s competition. Trillions of yuan are being spent to support a national recovery from COVID-19, including building massive 5G capacity to ensure future manufacturing capabilities.

That’s certainly justifiable. Roads to nowhere aren’t. Past disasters tend to frame thinking about future ones. Yet threats aren’t static — climate change is speeding up the severity of flooding. Risk assessments need to factor in where China’s wealth is being built. For instance, quantifiable flood losses in heavily industrialized Guangdong province in 2015 reached around 30 billion yuan, but disruption to its concentration of roads and railways, ports and airports pushed costs far higher. The cities of southern China are at great jeopardy.
One example of how mitigation efforts are being outpaced is the strategy of diversion zones adopted two decades ago, setting aside areas where authorities released water to control excessive flow. Resettled people have since been driven further away from zones where they were supposed to live as ever-larger amounts of water need to be unleashed. Eventually, they end up on lands that aren’t eligible for compensation.
Beijing’s ministries have issued streams of climate change-related rules and targets, and China was at one point considered a leader. This was supposed to be the year that companies got better about environmental and social governance disclosures. Constrained coffers, the viral outbreak, trade war with the U.S., and slowing economic growth will make it harder to put future floods and the like front of mind. That needs a rethink.
Consider this knock-on effect. In theory, banks will likely take losses because of natural disasters; their clients will pass them along to insurers. In China, insurance companies aren’t well-prepared; statistics remain sparse and risk-modelling around flood events has become more difficult. In 2016, China’s nonlife insurers were hit with losses of more than 4 billion yuan related to floods and storms between June and August. This time, Fitch Ratings Inc. analysts expect claims “to continue to surge as the rainy season is not over yet in certain parts of China.” They noted on July 15 that insurers in Hubei, Guangxi and Jiangxi provinces had reported aggregate incurred losses of more than 500 million yuan as of a week earlier, including claims from motor, agricultural and property insurance.The last thing China’s burdened, state-run financial institutions need are continued natural disasters. As tough as this year has been, it may be time to re-calibrate priorities. Building 5G base stations and rail lines won’t matter if they get wiped out by floods again and again.
 
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bob the dog

Electoral Member
Aug 14, 2020
885
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3 Gorges dam is failing. A big ol mess isnt far off.

The big China disaster that you're missing​

  • This aerial photo taken on Aug. 23 shows water being released from China's Three Gorges Dam in Yichang, Hubei province. | AFP-JIJI's Three Gorges Dam in Yichang, Hubei province. | AFP-JIJI This aerial photo taken on Aug. 23 shows water being released from China's Three Gorges Dam in Yichang, Hubei province. | AFP-JIJI
  • BY ANJANI TRIVEDI

  • BLOOMBER Sep 1, 2020
The world’s largest dam is under pressure in the massive flooding that’s wiping away billions of dollars of value in China. The predicament symbolizes a looming crisis for Beijing. Climate change is bringing more frequent and intense deluges that threaten the economic heartland, and infrastructure defenses installed with the disasters of previous eras in mind can’t keep up. There’s very little time to prepare for what’s coming.
The problem isn’t that China lacks water management projects. It has built hundreds of thousands of levees, dikes, reservoirs and dams on its seven major river systems. But many are struggling to cope with months of rain-fed flooding that has ravaged vast swathes of industrial and agricultural land and engulfed millions of homes. This past week, officials feared that the Three Gorges Dam on the mighty Yangtze was peaking and could overflow. Elsewhere, authorities have blown up barriers that were causing more damage than help.



China has experienced three of the world’s 10 most devastating floods since 1950. The limited number of deaths this time is a testament to how far the country has come, with officials saying that at least 219 people have died or disappeared. Yet flooding in cities is getting worse, a sign of rising populations and failure to execute urbanization policies.
Annual average losses from river inundations are the highest in the world. Flood policy hasn’t been made the a priority it should be given the high stakes. The Yangtze River Economic Belt is home to more than 40 percent of China’s population (about 600 million people) and accounts for almost 50 percent of export value and 45 percent of gross domestic product, according to China Water Risk. On its own, the region could be the third-largest economy in the world.

More severe disasters are anticipated. Hydroclimatologist Peter Gleick, a member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, told the South China Morning Post that climate change is increasing the risks of extreme rainfall events, making it “even more likely that dams like the Three Gorges will be unable to prevent the worst flooding from occurring in the future.”
A study has found that if temperatures rise by 2 degrees, flows around the Yangtze and other major world rivers will intensify, increasing the frequency of huge floods. Heavy rain days are already more numerous and intense inside cities compared to suburban areas along the Yangtze, a study using rainfall records over two periods between 1961 and 2010 found. Such days increase by 30 percent on average in places like Suzhou, near Shanghai, known for wedding gowns and bridal exports along with big tech factories.

China isn’t shy about deploying money. Last year, 726 billion yuan ($105 billion) was shoveled into water conservancy construction — the highest in history, according to CLSA Securities Ltd. Flood management has received 1.2 billion yuan in central government funds since the beginning of the rainy season. But there’s competition. Trillions of yuan are being spent to support a national recovery from COVID-19, including building massive 5G capacity to ensure future manufacturing capabilities.

That’s certainly justifiable. Roads to nowhere aren’t. Past disasters tend to frame thinking about future ones. Yet threats aren’t static — climate change is speeding up the severity of flooding. Risk assessments need to factor in where China’s wealth is being built. For instance, quantifiable flood losses in heavily industrialized Guangdong province in 2015 reached around 30 billion yuan, but disruption to its concentration of roads and railways, ports and airports pushed costs far higher. The cities of southern China are at great jeopardy.
One example of how mitigation efforts are being outpaced is the strategy of diversion zones adopted two decades ago, setting aside areas where authorities released water to control excessive flow. Resettled people have since been driven further away from zones where they were supposed to live as ever-larger amounts of water need to be unleashed. Eventually, they end up on lands that aren’t eligible for compensation.
Beijing’s ministries have issued streams of climate change-related rules and targets, and China was at one point considered a leader. This was supposed to be the year that companies got better about environmental and social governance disclosures. Constrained coffers, the viral outbreak, trade war with the U.S., and slowing economic growth will make it harder to put future floods and the like front of mind. That needs a rethink.
Consider this knock-on effect. In theory, banks will likely take losses because of natural disasters; their clients will pass them along to insurers. In China, insurance companies aren’t well-prepared; statistics remain sparse and risk-modelling around flood events has become more difficult. In 2016, China’s nonlife insurers were hit with losses of more than 4 billion yuan related to floods and storms between June and August. This time, Fitch Ratings Inc. analysts expect claims “to continue to surge as the rainy season is not over yet in certain parts of China.” They noted on July 15 that insurers in Hubei, Guangxi and Jiangxi provinces had reported aggregate incurred losses of more than 500 million yuan as of a week earlier, including claims from motor, agricultural and property insurance.The last thing China’s burdened, state-run financial institutions need are continued natural disasters. As tough as this year has been, it may be time to re-calibrate priorities. Building 5G base stations and rail lines won’t matter if they get wiped out by floods again and again.
Doesn't mention the structure is failing, just that there is too much water.

They need to get the Manitoba NDP in there to dig a diversionary relief channel
 

taxslave

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 25, 2008
34,611
3,091
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Vancouver Island
In the case of Three Gorges, flooded villages as well.

Strategically located and planned they have less impact and can pack a big punch.
That happens everywhere dams are built. Still far superior to nukes. or windfarms.or solar farms. We have a few solar lights in the driveway. Only charge enough for about 4 hrs of lights.
 
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Gilgamesh

Council Member
Nov 15, 2014
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It's Official: Solar Is the Cheapest Electricity in History​


View attachment 3037

The International Energy Agency (IEA) says the cost per megawatt to build solar plants is below fossil fuels worldwide for the first time.Public success stories like Elon Musk's solar and wind battery farm in Australia have helped move public sentiment.All four IEA scenarios include a mix of renewables as well as nuclear and the world's remaining fossil fuel plants.

In a new report, the International Energy Agency (IEA) says solar is now the cheapest form of electricity for utility companies to build. That’s thanks to risk-reducing financial policies around the world, the agency says, and it applies to locations with both the most favorable policies and the easiest access to financing. The report underlines how important these policies are to encouraging development of renewables and other environmentally forward technologies.

Carbon Brief (CB) summarizes the annual report with a lot of key details. The World Energy Outlook 2020 “offers four ‘pathways’ to 2040, all of which see a major rise in renewables,” CB says. “The IEA’s main scenario has 43 [percent] more solar output by 2040 than it expected in 2018, partly due to detailed new analysis showing that solar power is 20 [to] 50 [percent] cheaper than thought.”

Nonsense. Just declaring it, (as they have been for years) does nor make it so,. A decade or so when advanced solid state batteries are cheap then maybe, but not right now..
 
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Gilgamesh

Council Member
Nov 15, 2014
1,081
46
48
That happens everywhere dams are built. Still far superior to nukes. or windfarms.or solar farms. We have a few solar lights in the driveway. Only charge enough for about 4 hrs of lights.
Your dismissal of nukes shows an abysmal ignorance. Pity.
 

bob the dog

Electoral Member
Aug 14, 2020
885
694
93
Your dismissal of nukes shows an abysmal ignorance. Pity.
I agree about nuclear power but don't know the actual megawatt count. Nuclear has had it's chances but the industry suffers from gigantic setbacks time after time and everyone hates uranium. Maybe someday there will be no other answer and people get on board.

One thing about Three Gorges failing is the world will be a different place. Imagine that and the Lebanon explosion happening at the same time. A fat guy farts in Alaska and that's it. Just a planet.
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
98,845
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Moccasin Flats
SK will start pumping out dirt cheap geothermal power in the next 16-24 months.

Successful tests allow DEEP to plan 20 MW geothermal power plant in Saskatchewan

Alexander Richter
Alexander Richter

3 months ago

Canadian geothermal developer DEEP Earth Energy Production Corp. today announced that its spring/summer flow testing program indicates the temperature and flow rates from the geothermal reservoir in the Deadwood Formation are sufficient to support multiple geothermal power facilities. DEEP will commence drilling this month with the deepest horizontal well to date in Saskatchewan’s history, allowing for the installation of a large diameter submersible pump. This initial horizontal well will be the first step in constructing the first geothermal power facility in Canada. Early power generation technology is being sourced for immediate selfgeneration, supplying power for drilling, testing and construction activities for the Williston Basin’s first 20 MegaWatt (MW) geothermal power plant, which can supply enough power for approximately 20,000 households.
Thermal imaging video captured by drone on August 20th , showing the production and injection loop test between wells Border-3 and Border-1 can be viewed here below.
In addition to geothermal power generation, DEEP is pursuing the utilization of waste oilfield flare gas and solar generation to power the facility’s internal and external parasitic power requirements (cooling towers, lighting, pumps). This globally unique power hub will produce clean baseload power while significantly reducing fossil fuel emissions. Utilizing local world class oilfield drilling expertise, this project is a first step in Canada’s significant energy transition to clean power. This first 20 MW field would offset approximately 114,000 metric tonnes of CO2 /year, equal to removing 32,000 cars off the road annually.
Major private and public sector greenhouse developments that support research into diverse high-value crops, increase farm profitability and supply locally grown produce will utilize waste heat from the project, providing major local employment opportunities and addressing national food security concerns. “DEEP’s vision to build 100 MW of geothermal power and greenhouse development could be a new $1 billion industry for Southeast Saskatchewan,” said Kirsten Marcia, DEEP President & CEO.
“This is a first for Canada – and it’s the beginning of something big. Geothermal energy can create lots of jobs in Western Canada and across the country – all while helping us get to net zero,” noted The Honourable Seamus O’Regan, Minister of Natural Resources Canada.
Previous winter drilling and testing demonstrate that the vast and predictable hot sedimentary aquifer at the base of the Williston Basin can support multiple 20 MW baseload geothermal power facilities. Flow tests and injection tests have demonstrated consistent and repeatable results in the Deadwood Formation sandstone. Testing of the Border-4 well, located 7 kilometres to the west of the main project site, demonstrated the same consistent production rates.
As shown in the video above, the first geothermal production and injection “loop” test of its kind in Canada has been in operation since July 31, 2020, using Border-3 as the production well and Border-1 as the injection well. The reservoir and the wells – which are about 750 m apart are performing at or above expectations with no operational issues. Hot (122°C) brine is brought to the surface from a vertical depth of approximately 3,500 metres (m) using an electric submersible pump (ESP) installed at a depth of 2,800 m. At surface, the brine flows through containment tanks before being re-injected back into the same formation. A chemical tracer injected into Border-1 at the start of the loop test and daily water sampling are providing valuable data to better understand fluid flow dynamics and reservoir parameters.
DEEP has completed a preliminary subsurface design that optimizes the well spacing and configuration to produce 20 MW of geothermal power using ten horizontal wells (6 producers and 4 injectors). Each well will be drilled to a vertical depth of approximately 3.5 kilometers (km) and a horizontal length of approximately 2 km.
The subsurface development area for each 20 MW block measures approximately 5 x 8 km, while the surface disturbance is approximately 300 x 300 metres. This innovative design was developed by Dr. Matthew Minnick (RESPEC Inc.) and Leo Groenewoud, DEEP’s Exploration and Geoscience Manager. Dave Brown (Frontier Project Solutions) has developed the preliminary well design, engineering and operational details associated with the development wells. To assess feasibility, reservoir engineering will be undertaken by GeothermEx, Inc. (a Schlumberger company) and surface facilities engineering will be undertaken by Enerpro Engineering, Inc.
The upcoming horizontal well – Border-5HZ – is designed to optimize flow rates and contact with the reservoir. After completing the current loop test, Border-3 will be converted for use as an injection well to enable the full-scale commercial loop test, producing from Border-5HZ and injecting into Border-1 and Border-3. Border-2B will be used as a monitoring well.
“We will produce enough high temperature volume from this first horizontal well to generate power utilizing Organic Rankine Cycle technology,” said Kirsten Marcia, DEEP President & CEO. “We are in the process of procuring a temporary 200-400 kilowatt system, providing onsite power during the upcoming construction phase. It’s an exciting step.”
The resource and surface facilities engineering work to confirm the feasibility of the first 20 MW project is expected to be complete in Q1 2021. The feasibility analysis will be based in large on the results of the large volume horizontal well loop test, leading to the final construction design in the Bankable Feasibility Report.
DEEP gratefully acknowledges the continued support from Natural Resources Canada for the funding announced in 2019 and for their ongoing support in the development of Canada’s first geothermal power project. By re-deploying world class oilfield expertise on a renewable energy project for the first time in Canada, this Federal funding is providing employment opportunities in a sector hard hit by job losses. New opportunities created from this geothermal power project, such as heating for greenhouses and aquaculture (fish farming), will be a welcome economic boost for the province.
We are also grateful to the Government of Saskatchewan for their continued support for the energy industry in the province. With their support, DEEP’s innovative clean energy project will demonstrate sustainable power for Saskatchewan, making progress on its emissions reduction goals. Like many other energy projects, progress on DEEP’s geothermal power project would not have gone forward without the support and guidance from the Ministry of Energy and Resources, the Ministry of Environment and SaskPower. Working together, regulatory and permitting processes for geothermal energy were developed, facilitating progress on geothermal power production and innovative uses of geothermal heat for sustainable food growing opportunities.
 

KylieParr

New Member
Mar 25, 2021
5
0
1
Hello everyone, most likely this is really one of the most economical devices that were created by Elon Musk in Australia. But not everyone can afford the money to have electricity coming to his house from this station since there are few of them in the world and there is a great demand for them. I recently came across https://www.simplyswitch.com/energy/guides/who-is-my-supplier/ here's a company like this and I still haven't figured it out, I see the positive sides, but there are not enough negative ones, it seems to me that there is some kind of catch here, don't you think?
 
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Blackleaf

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 9, 2004
46,527
1,378
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I'm not bothered. I don't pay the leccy bills for this house. I don't pay any bills at all, nor even council tax. So almost all of my monthly wages are for me to spend on what I want. The only think I do pay for is my TV licence.