It's Climate Change I tell'ya!! IT'S CLIMATE CHANGE!!

Serryah

Senate Member
Dec 3, 2008
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New Brunswick


I heard this on the news tonight.

And this is the part that has me wondering if the Pro Oil people will freak out still. I mean, if Alberta can switch to Hydrogen production instead of Oil...


The hydrogen economy

Hydrogen can be sourced through electrolysis, the process of using electricity to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. It can also be converted from natural gas — and Alberta is a leader in Canada when it comes to natural gas production. Both buses will use hydrogen produced in Alberta's Industrial Heartland.

In 2021, about 2.5 million tonnes of hydrogen were produced in the province, according to the Alberta Energy Regulator, and production is expected to ramp up to more than 3.5 million tonnes by 2031.


Eddie Robar is the branch manager of fleet and facility services for the City of Edmonton. (Peter Evans/CBC)
"Hydrogen is really this Swiss Army knife that Alberta already has a lot of expertise in, and given this global appetite for hydrogen, we can really be a global leader in this space," said Bryan Helfenbaum, executive director of advanced hydrocarbons with Alberta Innovates.

The element is predominantly used in industrial settings in Alberta right now, but there is an opportunity to apply it to broader markets, such as heating and power generation, said Helfenbaum.

"We already have the technologies in place to make it, to move it and to use it," he said.

A report published by the federal government in 2020 projected that hydrogen could deliver up to 30 per cent of Canada's end-use energy by 2050.

The report said that if the country seized on hydrogen opportunities, it could lead to more than 350,000 jobs and direct revenues of more than $50 billion a year by 2050.

Helfenbaum said hydrogen seems to be fashionable roughly every 20 years but he thinks the time is now ripe, considering the push to decarbonize the energy sector.

"There's a half a trillion dollars of projects that have been announced worldwide for various kinds of hydrogen supply, transportation, storage and end-use and accounting for up to one-quarter of the energy demand and millions of jobs," he said.

"Hydrogen is on fire right now globally."
 
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Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
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I heard this on the news tonight.

And this is the part that has me wondering if the Pro Oil people will freak out still. I mean, if Alberta can switch to Hydrogen production instead of Oil...
Why would they freak out if they’re already not only already doing this but are the leaders in this?
Hydrogen can be sourced through electrolysis, the process of using electricity to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. It can also be converted from natural gas — and Alberta is a leader in Canada when it comes to natural gas production. Both buses will use hydrogen produced in Alberta's Industrial Heartland.
Where would the electricity come from for the electrolysis to convert this product from Natural Gas (?) & would that extra step and required power actually make it “Greener” than Natural Gas?
In 2021, about 2.5 million tonnes of hydrogen were produced in the province, according to the Alberta Energy Regulator, and production is expected to ramp up to more than 3.5 million tonnes by 2031.
I’m sure Hydrogen along with Natural Gas and Oil and Nuclear and Hydro with a side of wind and solar and geothermal will all have a roll to play going forward.
 
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Serryah

Senate Member
Dec 3, 2008
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Why would they freak out if they’re already not only already doing this but are the leaders in this?

Because it's not Oil.

Hydrogen, as the article says, has been a 'thing' that ebbs and flows; twenty years ago we could have started doing this. But it was "too expensive".

Here's where I get pissed about that excuse; too expensive right then but if enough push was put into development, we could have gotten to this point SOONER and then maybe there wouldn't be the bullshit with the "Carbon Tax", and "Job loss in the oil sector" and maybe even more, longer lasting jobs.

But because it wasn't Oil, it feels like it was "who cares; we don't".

Where would the electricity come from for the electrolysis to convert this product from Natural Gas (?) & would that extra step and required power actually make it “Greener” than Natural Gas?

I'm not sure? It is something to look deeper into. I'd say though that even IF there are products that aren't so Enviro friendly now in the process of it, their addition of 'bad' to the planet is offset by the fact that you're cutting out other harmful products in the process of switching to Hydrogen. How much, again, not sure specifically.

I’m sure Hydrogen along with Natural Gas and Oil and Nuclear and Hydro with a side of wind and solar and geothermal will all have a roll to play going forward.

I'm always wary/leery of Nuclear; yes I know it's cleaner and all - supposedly - but to me the risks aren't worth it if things fail.

There's always risks I think with any energy production though I just think Nuclear is the worst of the bunch.
 
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Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
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Because it's not Oil.

Hydrogen, as the article says, has been a 'thing' that ebbs and flows; twenty years ago we could have started doing this. But it was "too expensive".

Here's where I get pissed about that excuse; too expensive right then but if enough push was put into development, we could have gotten to this point SOONER and then maybe there wouldn't be the bullshit with the "Carbon Tax", and "Job loss in the oil sector" and maybe even more, longer lasting jobs.

But because it wasn't Oil, it feels like it was "who cares; we don't".



I'm not sure? It is something to look deeper into. I'd say though that even IF there are products that aren't so Enviro friendly now in the process of it, their addition of 'bad' to the planet is offset by the fact that you're cutting out other harmful products in the process of switching to Hydrogen. How much, again, not sure specifically.



I'm always wary/leery of Nuclear; yes I know it's cleaner and all - supposedly - but to me the risks aren't worth it if things fail.

There's always risks I think with any energy production though I just think Nuclear is the worst of the bunch.
Nuclear is a risk with the best environmental return I’d wager. Hydro is a risk too with a big environmental footprint, but should we ban it (or just tax it into obscurity?). I think a mix of all of the above is the potential solution, at least in the foreseeable future.
 
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pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
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Because it's not Oil.

Hydrogen, as the article says, has been a 'thing' that ebbs and flows; twenty years ago we could have started doing this. But it was "too expensive".

Here's where I get pissed about that excuse; too expensive right then but if enough push was put into development, we could have gotten to this point SOONER and then maybe there wouldn't be the bullshit with the "Carbon Tax", and "Job loss in the oil sector" and maybe even more, longer lasting jobs.

But because it wasn't Oil, it feels like it was "who cares; we don't".



I'm not sure? It is something to look deeper into. I'd say though that even IF there are products that aren't so Enviro friendly now in the process of it, their addition of 'bad' to the planet is offset by the fact that you're cutting out other harmful products in the process of switching to Hydrogen. How much, again, not sure specifically.



I'm always wary/leery of Nuclear; yes I know it's cleaner and all - supposedly - but to me the risks aren't worth it if things fail.

There's always risks I think with any energy production though I just think Nuclear is the worst of the bunch.
Oil is not a dirty word , and Natural gas is not oil either .
 
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Taxslave2

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Most of the really ardent oil spitters are just shills for nuke plants. They really want to kill the planet in a big hurry.
 

IdRatherBeSkiing

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spaminator

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Valley fever could be spreading across the U.S by climate change: Report
Author of the article:postmedia News
Published Feb 03, 2023 • 2 minute read

A fungal infection that predominately lives in soil in the southwestern United States could be spreading, with a study predicting it is likely to be found as far north as the U.S.-Canada border due to climate change.


Valley fever is an infection caused by the breathing in of a fungus called coccidioides, and is known to live in the soil in the southwestern U.S. and parts of Mexico and Central and South America.


According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control’s website, most people who breathe in the spores don’t get sick, while people who do get sick will recover on their own within weeks to months, but some will need antifungal medication.

While the fungus generally prefers warm, arid climates in the southwest, a 2019 GeoHealth study believes weather caused by climate change could spread the fungus into northwestern states, extending to the Canadian border before the end of the century.

“As the temperatures warm up, and the western half of the U.S. stays quite dry, our desert-like soils will kind of expand and these drier conditions could allow coccidioides to live in new places,” Morgan Gorris, who led the GeoHealth study while at the University of California, Irvine, told Today.com.


“We have seen a gradual increase in cases over the last five years, and a greater number of patients are coming into our clinic for diagnosis and treatment,” California-based Dr. George Thompson told Fox News Digital.

In response to the GeoHealth study, Thompson, a professor at UC Davis Health and co-director of the Center for Valley fever in Sacramento, said he was skeptical at first, “but I’ve recently heard about new cases emerging in Nebraska and even Missouri, so I think it’s in the realm of possibility.”

Symptoms of valley fever include fatigue, cough, fever, shortness of breath, headache, night sweats, muscle aches or joint pain, and rash on the upper body or legs.

About 20,000 cases of the infection were reported to the CDC in 2019, with 97% of cases found in Arizona and California. Rates of infection are highest among people 60 and older.

The CDC says about 200 people die from valley fever each year.

The most common way to diagnose the illness is through a blood test that detects antibodies, but health-care providers may do imaging tests such as chest X-rays or CT scans of the lungs to look for valley fever pneumonia, according to the CDC.

There is currently no vaccine to prevent valley fever.
 

Dixie Cup

House Member
Sep 16, 2006
4,859
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113
Edmonton

I heard this on the news tonight.

And this is the part that has me wondering if the Pro Oil people will freak out still. I mean, if Alberta can switch to Hydrogen production instead of Oil...


The hydrogen economy

Hydrogen can be sourced through electrolysis, the process of using electricity to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. It can also be converted from natural gas — and Alberta is a leader in Canada when it comes to natural gas production. Both buses will use hydrogen produced in Alberta's Industrial Heartland.

In 2021, about 2.5 million tonnes of hydrogen were produced in the province, according to the Alberta Energy Regulator, and production is expected to ramp up to more than 3.5 million tonnes by 2031.


Eddie Robar is the branch manager of fleet and facility services for the City of Edmonton. (Peter Evans/CBC)
"Hydrogen is really this Swiss Army knife that Alberta already has a lot of expertise in, and given this global appetite for hydrogen, we can really be a global leader in this space," said Bryan Helfenbaum, executive director of advanced hydrocarbons with Alberta Innovates.


The element is predominantly used in industrial settings in Alberta right now, but there is an opportunity to apply it to broader markets, such as heating and power generation, said Helfenbaum.

"We already have the technologies in place to make it, to move it and to use it," he said.

A report published by the federal government in 2020 projected that hydrogen could deliver up to 30 per cent of Canada's end-use energy by 2050.

The report said that if the country seized on hydrogen opportunities, it could lead to more than 350,000 jobs and direct revenues of more than $50 billion a year by 2050.

Helfenbaum said hydrogen seems to be fashionable roughly every 20 years but he thinks the time is now ripe, considering the push to decarbonize the energy sector.

"There's a half a trillion dollars of projects that have been announced worldwide for various kinds of hydrogen supply, transportation, storage and end-use and accounting for up to one-quarter of the energy demand and millions of jobs," he said.

"Hydrogen is on fire right now globally."
Trudeau will likely nix it so I'm not overly optimistic, especially if it's beneficial to anyone other than Quebec. Sorry, not likely to happen unless we get rid of the scum that supposedly represents us.
 
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