Iceland's volcano

Socrates the Greek

I Remember them....
Apr 15, 2006
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Just like Krakatoa in 1883.



Small sea level oscillations from Krakatoa's explosion were recorded by tide gauges as far away as Hawaii, the American West Coast, South America, and even as far away as the English Channel, in France and England. It took 12 hours for the tsunami from Krakatoa's explosion to reach Aden on the southern tip of the Arabian Peninsula, some 3800 nautical miles away.

KRAKATOA (KRAKATOA VOLCANO) - THE GREAT TSUNAMI OF AUGUST 26, 1883 FROM THE EXPLOSION OF THE KRAKATAU VOLCANO ("krakatoa") IN INDONESIA - by Dr. George Pararas-Carayannis
 

JLM

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 27, 2008
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Vernon, B.C.
The good news is: rift volcanoes aren't given to the violence of subduction zone volcanoes.

The bad news is: Volcanoes can't read....

Not to mention many people not dying in plane crashes everyday. Good thing actually - this business of riding around in planes has reached the point of stupidity anyway- how many tons of fossil fuels get burnt daily? thousands?
 

JLM

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 27, 2008
75,291
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Vernon, B.C.
Wonder where Suzuki and Gore and all their little rent a riot buds are with all this pollution going on.

This is a little different, this is natural pollution as opposed to all that man made pollution we've been putting up with.

The planet is likely better equipped to handle natural pollution. :smile:
 

Kreskin

Doctor of Thinkology
Feb 23, 2006
21,155
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Small sea level oscillations from Krakatoa's explosion were recorded by tide gauges as far away as Hawaii, the American West Coast, South America, and even as far away as the English Channel, in France and England. It took 12 hours for the tsunami from Krakatoa's explosion to reach Aden on the southern tip of the Arabian Peninsula, some 3800 nautical miles away.

KRAKATOA (KRAKATOA VOLCANO) - THE GREAT TSUNAMI OF AUGUST 26, 1883 FROM THE EXPLOSION OF THE KRAKATAU VOLCANO ("krakatoa") IN INDONESIA - by Dr. George Pararas-Carayannis
Remind me not to live in Indonesia. Does anything go right over there?
 

Blackleaf

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 9, 2004
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It's not just Iceland that is suffering from the volcano. It's almost the whole of Europe. As I write this, I am sitting under a huge cloud of volcanic ash that is not only covering the whole of the UK but is also covering the whole of northern Europe (Mount Eyjafjallajokull is only about 700 miles away).

All flights in the UK and almost the rest of Europe have been grounded for the first time since World War II, obviously leading to scenes of turmoil at airports when people are finding out they can't return home, go on holiday or go on a business trip or whatever.

Some of the volcanic ash has been settling on the ground and on people's vehicles in some areas, and there are warnings for people with respiratory conditions to not stay outside for too long if they start feeling ill.

The last time this Icelandic volcano erupted, in 1821, it erupted for two years, on and off. There were no aeroplanes in those days, so a similar length of eruption now would cause more havoc.

And when another Icelandic volcano, Laki, erupted in 1783, thousands of people were killed throughout Europe, including 8000 in Britain. People throughout the country reported strange, dazzling sunsets every evening.
 

JLM

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 27, 2008
75,291
538
113
Vernon, B.C.
It's not just Iceland that is suffering from the volcano. It's almost the whole of Europe. As I write this, I am sitting under a huge cloud of volcanic ash that is not only covering the whole of the UK but is also covering the whole of northern Europe (Mount Eyjafjallajokull is only about 700 miles away).

All flights in the UK and almost the rest of Europe have been grounded for the first time since World War II, obviously leading to scenes of turmoil at airports when people are finding out they can't return home, go on holiday or go on a business trip or whatever.

Some of the volcanic ash has been settling on the ground and on people's vehicles in some areas, and there are warnings for people with respiratory conditions to not stay outside for too long if they start feeling ill.

The last time this Icelandic volcano erupted, in 1821, it erupted for two years, on and off. There were no aeroplanes in those days, so a similar length of eruption now would cause more havoc.

And when another Icelandic volcano, Laki, erupted in 1783, thousands of people were killed throughout Europe, including 8000 in Britain. People throughout the country reported strange, dazzling sunsets every evening.

Maybe it's too much to hope for but it could just be Mother Nature's way of putting an end to this nonsense of people flying all over the place for no really valid reasons.