Humboldt Broncos bus crash

Curious Cdn

Hall of Fame Member
Feb 22, 2015
37,070
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36
Good morning, Troll.
 

DaSleeper

Trolling Hypocrites
May 27, 2007
33,676
1,665
113
Northern Ontario,
Good morning, Troll.
B.T.W. I even troll in Jam sessions..Once at a festival I noticed this older .guy of a bit to the side was eying me and copying my finger positions on the guitar...
During a break in the music, I decided to Capo up...
I would play the same chords but different left hand finger position.
Well the guy who had to be tone deaf kept imitating my finger positions without a capo, much to the chagrin of the people playing besides him........
Now that's what I call a good troll!
 
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Curious Cdn

Hall of Fame Member
Feb 22, 2015
37,070
7
36
B.T.W. I even troll in Jam sessions..Once at a festival I noticed this older .guy of a bit to the side was eying me and copying my finger positions on the guitar...
During a break in the music, I decided to Capo up...
I would play the same chords but different left hand finger position.
Well the guy who had to be tone deaf kept imitating my finger positions without a capo, much to the chagrin of the people playing besides him........
Now that's what I call a good troll!
Try doing that while transposing it into a different key. They'll either put you in charge or show you the door.
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
36,540
3,155
113
Humboldt seeks new image to help city move on from Broncos tragedy
Canadian Press
Published:
September 6, 2019
Updated:
September 6, 2019 7:50 PM EDT
Humboldt is looking to re-vamp its image as a way of helping people move past the Broncos tragedy. Matthew Smith / THE CANADIAN PRESS
HUMBOLDT, Sask. — The Saskatchewan city of Humboldt is looking to revamp its image as a way of helping people move past the Broncos bus crash.
Spokeswoman Penny Lee says Humboldt became known to many as “the grieving city” after the April 6, 2018 collision.
Sixteen people died and 13 were injured when the driver of a semi-truck missed a stop sign at a rural intersection and drove into the path of the junior hockey team’s bus.
“Possibly everybody’s felt that, OK, Humboldt is just about the Broncos,” Lee said Friday.
“We’re so much more than that.”
Residents are being asked to fill out a survey that will be used to help the city craft a new look. It may include a new logo and tag line.
“We’ve actually heard businesses, local businesses, say that their suppliers are afraid to come to Humboldt because, ‘Oh no. They’re still grieving,”‘ Lee said.
“We want to get that message out that … it’s OK. We’re moving on and we want everybody else to move on, but not forget.”
Although many people still use the phrase “Humboldt Strong,” which emerged after the crash, Lee said she doesn’t think the city will adopt it as an official slogan because it may not make sense to residents in future years.
So far, she said, people who have responded to the survey say Humboldt is a clean and friendly place to be.
“To me, that’s exactly what it was before April 6.”
http://torontosun.com/news/national...age-to-help-city-move-on-from-broncos-tragedy
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
36,540
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'Are my friends all dead?' Nurse first on scene remembers Humboldt Broncos crash
Canadian Press
Published:
October 14, 2019
Updated:
October 14, 2019 2:50 PM EDT
Saskatchewan nurse Vivian York, visits Broncos player Ryan Straschnitzki in a Saskatoon hospital in April, 2018 as shown in this image provided by Ryan's father Tom Straschnitzki.Tom Straschnitzki / THE CANADIAN PRESS
Vivian York recalls that the debris was still flying when she drove up to an intersection where the Humboldt Broncos hockey bus and a semi-truck carrying peat moss had just collided.
The nurse was coming home from a haircut and was the first person at the chaotic scene on a highway north of Tisdale, Sask., on April 6, 2018. Sixteen people died and 13 others were injured.
She told The Canadian Press in a recent interview that she struggled after the accident and wondered if there was anything more she could have done. She regrets not having more time with each person she tried to help on that late afternoon.
“I didn’t have time to ask their names. When I look back and think, ‘This kid was dead or this kid had a head injury,’ then when I saw … their faces in the paper I thought, ‘Which one were you?”‘
York, who lives just a few kilometres from the crash site, said she dreams about the accident regularly.
“It’s on my mind every day. Every time I drive by there. I literally get … goosebumps and the hair on my arms stands up — even now talking about it.”
York, 59, said she intends to retire from nursing soon and move home to Alberta. Although she didn’t see a counsellor after her experience, she hopes to become one herself.
“It’s been life-altering for me and I’m glad I was there to do what I could. It always brings me to tears. Just the magnitude of it all.”
The first thing she can remember is seeing “the tires of the bus and a bunch of peat moss, so I thought it was just a truck rolled over. But as I went by I saw a person crawling on the ground.”
Pulling himself from the wreckage was player Nick Shumlanski, the only one not to be injured. She got him a blanket.
“I didn’t realize how bad it was until I turned around. All I could see were multitudes of bodies and blond hair everywhere. Lots and lots and lots of bodies. That’s when I started going from person to person to see what I could do,” York said.
“There was only about 12 or 13 in view that I had anything to do with. The rest were dead underneath the debris. The front end of the bus was gone, but all the seats were intact. There was one guy hanging out of the seat who was dead.”
Teammates had dyed their hair blond for the Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League playoffs.
“They all looked alike. They were all of an athletic build and … most of them didn’t have any shirts on because they were changing, apparently, and it was cold.
“I just concentrated on opening airways and warming people up and trying to get more help.”
York said several people, including some volunteer firefighters arrived, but it was 45 minutes before there were any ambulances.
It was frustrating, she said, because as a healthcare worker she knew what the victims needed but had nothing to work with.
One of the last people she tended to was Ryan Straschnitzki, a teen from Airdrie, Alta., who would be left paralyzed from the chest down.
“I could see Ryan sitting there in shock all by himself, so I went over to him. He just kept wanting me to lay him down because he was in so much pain, but I wanted to keep him upright.”
York said it appeared Straschnitzki, propped up against the truck’s undercarriage, had been thrown a long distance.
“He was thrown all the way over to where the truck was lying. All the debris and the bodies were in between.”
Straschnitzki kept drifting in and out of consciousness, she said.
“He knew he was paralyzed and his hockey career was over. He said to me, ‘Are my friends all dead?”‘
She visited him later in a Saskatoon hospital.
“He was still so swollen and he couldn’t move or anything, but he had one working arm and put it around me and gave me a hug. It just ripped my heart out.”
York ended up giving Straschnitzki a necklace with a half moon that she always wore. It now sits on his bedside table at home. And the pair keep in touch through monthly texts.
“Something just made me tell him to take it as a good-luck charm,” York said.
“I don’t know if it was a good-luck charm for me to be on scene that day wearing that necklace.”
http://torontosun.com/news/national...rst-on-scene-remembers-humboldt-broncos-crash
 

MHz

Time Out
Mar 16, 2007
41,030
43
48
Red Deer AB
What career, the players where not in the NHL.

Way to milk a disaster for all it's worth though. More like the 'hobby' killed any career they could have had. The hockey players that went onto become Chiefs for life were the dumbest people for that position. It appears hockey players are not the smartest people even when they are white.