Hamas attacks Israel

Ron in Regina

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Apr 9, 2008
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KFAR AZA, Israel — They were childhood sweethearts. They’d been together since they were 16, when they met in high school, in Ashdod. On Oct. 7, 2023, they were murdered here in this old-style kibbutz, built more than 70 years ago in a grove of eucalyptus and tamarisk trees.

There is nothing exceptional about the story of Sivan Elkabets and Naor Hasidim. It’s just one heartbreaking story about two horrible deaths among 1,139 merciless and unspeakably cruel murders in a complex, meticulously planned and cunningly executed terror operation that has changed the world.

What happened on Oct. 7, four months ago this week, was the bloodiest single day in Jewish history since the Holocaust, and by far the worst act of terrorism in Israeli history.
Israel's chief military spokesperson Rear Admiral Daniel Hagari said on Tuesday that 31 of the remaining hostages held in Gaza were pronounced dead.

"We have informed 31 families that their captured loved ones are no longer among the living and that we have pronounced them dead," he told a regular media briefing.

Israel has said 136 hostages are still being held in Gaza.
Israel began its military offensive in Gaza after militants from Hamas-ruled Gaza killed 1,200 people and took 253 hostages in southern Israel on Oct. 7.

Saudi Arabia put U.S.-backed plans to normalise ties with Israel on ice, sources familiar with Riyadh's thinking told Reuters in Oct, 2023, as the war between Palestinian militant group Hamas and Israeli forces escalated.

Saudi Arabia has told the U.S. its position stands that there will be no diplomatic relations with Israel unless an independent Palestinian state is recognised on the 1967 borders with East Jerusalem, and Israeli "aggression" on the Gaza Strip stops, the Saudi foreign ministry said in a statement on Wednesday.
….& why 1967 borders with East Jerusalem?
Egyptian security sources told Reuters on Tuesday that Hamas' response showed “flexibility”, asking for a specific timeline for the ceasefire to end after the Muslim Eid al-Fitr holiday in early April. That would be appropriate, for Muslims, seeing as this war started on the Israeli holiday of Simchat Torah with the Hamas/Palestinian attack.
A ceasefire deal in Gaza is seen by the US as the most realistic way to reduce tensions further afield.

On Tuesday, Israel confirmed that 31 of the 136 remaining hostages in Gaza had been killed. During a week-long ceasefire in late November, 105 Israeli and foreign hostages were freed in exchange for 240 Palestinians held in Israeli jails.

The proposal was sent to Hamas around a week ago but a representative told the Reuters news agency it had taken them until Tuesday to respond because parts of it were "unclear and ambiguous."

Qatari Prime Minister Sheikh Mohammed Bin Abdulrahman al Thani has described Hamas's response as "positive" in general.
A top priority for Israel and the U.S. is releasing the remaining women hostages who were supposed to get out in November but were not freed as Hamas had promised.

Many of them were victims of sexual assault and other abuses, according to eyewitness testimony and other evidence Israel has been able to collect over the last two months, according to a diplomatic source.
Hamas responded to the latest Gaza cease-fire plan Tuesday, drawing reactions that termed its reply anywhere from "generally positive'' to "a little over the top,'' reflecting the complicated nature of the negotiations.

The militant group said it still seeks “a comprehensive and complete” cease-fire to end “the aggression against our people.” Hamas is also expected to demand the release of a “large” number of Palestinian prisoners, including high-profile militants, in exchange for the remaining surviving hostages.

Qatari Prime Minister Sheikh Mohammed bin Abdulrahman Al Thani, who has been a key mediator in the efforts to end Israel's war against Hamas in Gaza, said he was "optimistic" and noted that the Palestinian group's response to the blueprint had included some comments but "in general it is positive."

Hamas’ proposal would effectively leave the militant group in power in Gaza and allow it to rebuild its military capabilities, a scenario that Israel adamantly rejects.

In the first 45-day phase, Hamas would release all remaining women and children, as well as older men and those who are ill, in exchange for the release of all the women, children, sick and older prisoners held by Israel. Israel would release an additional 1,500 Palestinian prisoners, including 500 specified by Hamas – likely high-profile militants serving life sentences.

Israel would withdraw its forces from population centers, halt aerial operations and allow in far more humanitarian aid and the start of reconstruction. It would also allow displaced people to return to their homes, including in northern Gaza, and open all crossings.

In the second phase, which would be negotiated during the first, Hamas would release the remaining hostages, mainly soldiers and civilian men, in exchange for more prisoners, and Israel would complete its withdrawal from Gaza. The two sides would exchange the remains of deceased hostages and prisoners in a third stage, which would give way to a long-term truce.

A Hamas official and two Egyptian officials confirmed the authenticity of the document published by Lebanon’s Al-Akhbar newspaper on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to brief media on the sensitive negotiations. The newspaper is close to Lebanon’s Hezbollah militant group, an ally of Hamas.
 
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Ron in Regina

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Speaking in Tel Aviv Wednesday, Blinken suggested negotiations could still move forward, saying he believed Netanyahu’s comments dismissing the Hamas proposal as “delusional” were referring to its “absolute non-starters.”

“Clearly, there are things that Hamas sent back that are absolute non-starters and I assume that’s what the prime minister was referring to, but I don’t want to speak for him,” Blinken said.

He added that there was “space to continue to pursue an agreement, and these things are always negotiations.”

“It’s not flipping a light switch. It’s not yes or no. There’s invariably back and forth,” Blinken said.
 

petros

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Nov 21, 2008
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Speaking in Tel Aviv Wednesday, Blinken suggested negotiations could still move forward, saying he believed Netanyahu’s comments dismissing the Hamas proposal as “delusional” were referring to its “absolute non-starters.”

“Clearly, there are things that Hamas sent back that are absolute non-starters and I assume that’s what the prime minister was referring to, but I don’t want to speak for him,” Blinken said.

He added that there was “space to continue to pursue an agreement, and these things are always negotiations.”

“It’s not flipping a light switch. It’s not yes or no. There’s invariably back and forth,” Blinken said.
Hamas doesn't want to give up the IDF brass they took hostage?
 

Ron in Regina

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Hamas doesn't want to give up the IDF brass they took hostage?
Or Hamas, on top of the other things they want, they want to exchange the remaining undead & dead hostages from Israel from Oct 7th for a couple thousand “Palestinians” (not all Palestinians are Hamas, but all Hamas are Palestinians, etc…) in Israeli prisons…including 500 “Hand-Picked” by Hamas…which probably aren’t in there for Jaywalking or unpaid parking tickets.

They (Hamas) also want to be left in charge of Gaza, their money for nothing, their chicks for free, Israel & the rest of the world to pay for the consequences of their actions for attacking Israel on October 7th, a military resupply for themselves with a side of humanitarian aid for the non-Hamas for optics (all Hamas are Palestinians, but not all Palestinians are Hamas), etc…

This isn’t exactly the middle ground between the nation they attacked, and Hamas being the ones that broke the cease-fire with their attack on Israel on a Jewish Holy-Day in the first place. Those might be some of the sticking points.
 
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justfred

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I think that Israel should be able to send a large invoice to Gaza for all the future work that Israel has created . Just think of all the brick layers, all the homes, all the apartments they need to build, all of the undertakers they need to train and who will have a job for life. Given that the Hamas started the fight, with the help of Iran (so we are told) Hamas can count on Iran for their water, food, power, and money to rebuild.
 

Tecumsehsbones

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I think that Israel should be able to send a large invoice to Gaza for all the future work that Israel has created . Just think of all the brick layers, all the homes, all the apartments they need to build, all of the undertakers they need to train and who will have a job for life. Given that the Hamas started the fight, with the help of Iran (so we are told) Hamas can count on Iran for their water, food, power, and money to rebuild.
Can we send one to Japan?
 

Ron in Regina

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Apr 9, 2008
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You’d think, with the absolute billions syphoned off of “Palestinian aid” to Gaza by Hamas, it would be their turn to pony up & own up to the consequences of their own actions leading to what’s happened in Gaza in the last 4 months.
Hamas can put up the first 10 billion dollars, and once that money is spent, the rest of the world can look at what has been done and figure out what they will contribute on top of that if needed for actual Palestinian aid.
 
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spaminator

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B.C. minister Robinson stepping down over remarks that angered pro-Palestinian groups
Selina Robinson said Israel was founded on a 'crappy piece of land,' angering pro-Palestinian groups

Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Brieanna Charlebois, Chuck Chiang and Ashley Joannou
Published Feb 05, 2024 • Last updated 1 day ago • 5 minute read

VANCOUVER — British Columbia’s Post-Secondary Education Minister Selina Robinson is stepping down over her remarks that modern Israel was founded on “a crappy piece of land,” after her repeated apologies failed to quell the outcry from pro-Palestinian groups and others.


Premier David Eby said Robinson’s “belittling” remarks were incompatible with her remaining in cabinet, although she will stay in the NDP caucus.


“The depth of the work that Minister Robinson needs to do, in order to address the harms that she’s caused, is significant,” Eby told an impromptu news conference in Vancouver on Monday.

Eby told reporters Monday that Brenda Bailey, B.C.’s jobs minister, will immediately take over Robinson’s responsibilities, though no longer-term decisions have been made.

The premier had faced mounting calls for the removal of Robinson since the remarks last week that infuriated critics who called them racist and Islamophobic.

Representatives from more than a dozen B.C. mosques and Islamic associations wrote to Eby over the weekend calling for Robinson’s removal and banning NDP MLAs and candidates in the October provincial election from their sacred spaces until action was taken against her.


Bilal Cheema, a volunteer spokesman for the group, said Robinson’s exit prompted a “sigh of relief.”

Cheema said Robinson was welcome to be a part of important conversations with the community.

“Now she doesn’t have power over us being a cabinet minister. If she’s willing to engage, our doors are always going to be open,” he said.

“We welcome an opportunity to help her beat back her thinking, her beliefs, or understanding, on the difficult history of that region, or of how we are going to build and continue to sustain this mosaic that we’ve built here in British Columbia.”

But Ezra Shanken, CEO of the Jewish Federation of Greater Vancouver, said the departure of Robinson — who is one of the most prominent Jewish politicians in B.C. — was “shocking.”


“I think at a time when the intimidation of Jewish students on campus is as high as it’s ever been, to see a Jewish minister of advanced education stepping down sends really a chill down my spine,” he said.

“It’s obviously a very, very shocking thing to see, especially after Minister Robinson was apologetic and also came up with a plan for reconciliation.”

Eby said he and Robinson both agreed on her decision to quit, which came after two apologies from her, as well as a commitment that she would undertake anti-Islamophobia training.

“When you hurt somebody, you need to reach out to them and try to figure out what the best way is to reduce the harm and address the hurt that has been caused,” he said.

He said he and Robinson had been asking people “how to make things better,” and the decision Robinson had to go came after a “cumulative” process.


Robinson said in a statement she agreed her departure was for the best.

“This decision does not excuse my harmful comments, nor does it absolve me of the work I am committed to doing,” she said.

Robinson said she remained committed to her constituents, although she previously said she wasn’t running for re-election this year.

She made the original contentious remarks on Jan. 30 during a panel discussion with other Jewish politicians hosted by B’nai Brith Canada, in which she lamented a lack of knowledge by younger people about the foundation of modern Israel.

“They don’t understand it was a crappy piece of land with nothing on it. There were several hundred thousand people but other than that it didn’t produce an economy,” she said.


The remarks triggered a backlash from pro-Palestinian groups as well as from Robinson’s own party.

Federal NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh called them “offensive,” while the National Council of Canadian Muslims called them “horrendous.”

The announcement that Robinson was out came just a few hours after her second apology in five days.

“I am very sorry. I bear full responsibility,” said Robinson in the apology. “My words were inappropriate, wrong, and I now understand how they have contributed to Islamophobia and anti-Palestinian racism.”

But her critics were unsatisfied.

Dozens of protesters soon gathered outside an NDP caucus retreat in Surrey, B.C., where they tried to deliver a petition they said had 11,000 signatures calling for Robinson to be removed as a minister.


The protesters carrying signs saying “Selina must go” made their way into the Sheraton Vancouver Guildford Hotel before leaving the petition and documents about Palestinian history outside a meeting room.

Coquitlam resident Ramona Chu was at the Surrey protest.

She said Robinson’s original remarks made her feel sick, and that her apologies had felt “quite hollow.”

“It was framing that she made one mistake. But this is not one mistake. This is a pattern. It’s obviously a mindset,” Chu said of Robinson.

“I think, first of all, she needs to step down and give up her position of power and then she has to educate herself on colonialism. She needs to educate herself more about what’s going on in Palestine.”

Protester Jada-Gabrielle Pape, who said she was from the wu’Was’Ulwat’, Snuneymuxw and Saanich Nations, said Robinson’s comments were “egregious.”


“It’s hurtful to me as an Indigenous person to hear somebody speak of the land, to speak of the relatives that way. It violently dismisses the ongoing occupation and genocide for the Palestinian people in Gaza,” said Pape.

Eby said it is clear some protesters have an “agenda.”

“They want to divide. They want to split British Columbians apart and that is the complete opposite of what I want our government to do, and what Selina’s work is going to be going forward, which is to bring people together, and that is what informed this difficult decision today,” he said.

He called Robinson an “exceptional politician.”

The MLA for Coquitlam-Maillardville, east of Vancouver, is a former minister of finance, municipal affairs and housing, and citizens’ services.

Eby said the decision to keep Robinson in caucus is due to her extensive past work, but it doesn’t take away from the serious nature of her comments.

“She’s a representative of not just her own constituency, but of Jewish British Columbians and has absolutely done a ton of work with that community and more broadly, she’s a champion of the LGBTQ community and has stood up against bullies and spoken out for really vulnerable people,” said Eby.

“And she screwed up, she made a really significant error and so we need to address the harm that was caused by that.”

— With files from Nono Shen in Surrey
 

spaminator

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Michigan city ramps up security after op-ed calls it ’America’s jihad capital’
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Published Feb 05, 2024 • 1 minute read
Dearborn is ramping up its police presence in response to fallout from an opinion piece that described the city, which has the nation's highest Muslim population per capita, as "America's jihad capital." Hammoud, who is now the mayor of Dearborn, tweeted on Friday, Feb. 2, 2024, that city police increased security at places of worship and major infrastructure points as a "direct result" of the Wall Street Journal opinion piece titled, "Welcome to Dearborn, America's Jihad Capital."
Dearborn is ramping up its police presence in response to fallout from an opinion piece that described the city, which has the nation's highest Muslim population per capita, as "America's jihad capital." Hammoud, who is now the mayor of Dearborn, tweeted on Friday, Feb. 2, 2024, that city police increased security at places of worship and major infrastructure points as a "direct result" of the Wall Street Journal opinion piece titled, "Welcome to Dearborn, America's Jihad Capital."
DEARBORN, Mich. (AP) — Dearborn, Michigan, is ramping up its police presence in response to fallout from an opinion piece that described the city, which has the nation’s highest Muslim population per capita, as “America’s jihad capital.”


Dearborn Mayor Abdullah Hammoud on Friday tweeted that city police increased security at places of worship and major infrastructure points as a “direct result” of a Wall Street Journal opinion piece titled, “Welcome to Dearborn, America’s Jihad Capital.”


Hammoud posted on the X platform, formerly known as Twitter, that the item published Friday “led to an alarming increase in bigoted and Islamophobic rhetoric online targeting the city of Dearborn.”

Steven Stalinsky, executive director of the Middle East Media Research Institute, who authored the opinion piece in the Wall Street Journal, said in an interview with The Associated Press that he wanted to draw attention to protests in Michigan and elsewhere across the U.S. in which people have expressed support for Hamas since the start of the war with Israel.

More than 27,000 Palestinians, mostly women and minors, have been killed in Gaza since Hamas attacked Israel on Oct. 7, according to the Health Ministry in the Hamas-ruled territory. Hamas killed more than 1,200 people and kidnapped about 250 more, mostly civilians, in the attack.


“Nothing in my article was written to instigate any sort of hate,” Stalinsky said. “This is a moment for counterterrorism officials to be concerned.”

The Wall Street Journal did not immediately respond Sunday to requests for comment left by The Associated Press via email and voicemail. An email sent to a Dearborn spokeswoman also was not immediately returned Sunday.



In a tweet referencing Dearborn on Saturday, President Joe Biden condemned “hate in all forms.”

“Americans know that blaming a group of people based on the words of a small few is wrong,” Biden’s post read. “That’s exactly what can lead to Islamophobia and anti-Arab hate, and it shouldn’t happen to the residents of Dearborn — or any American town.”
 

spaminator

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Michigan city ramps up security after op-ed calls it ’America’s jihad capital’
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Published Feb 05, 2024 • 1 minute read
Dearborn is ramping up its police presence in response to fallout from an opinion piece that described the city, which has the nation's highest Muslim population per capita, as "America's jihad capital." Hammoud, who is now the mayor of Dearborn, tweeted on Friday, Feb. 2, 2024, that city police increased security at places of worship and major infrastructure points as a "direct result" of the Wall Street Journal opinion piece titled, "Welcome to Dearborn, America's Jihad Capital."
Dearborn is ramping up its police presence in response to fallout from an opinion piece that described the city, which has the nation's highest Muslim population per capita, as "America's jihad capital." Hammoud, who is now the mayor of Dearborn, tweeted on Friday, Feb. 2, 2024, that city police increased security at places of worship and major infrastructure points as a "direct result" of the Wall Street Journal opinion piece titled, "Welcome to Dearborn, America's Jihad Capital."
DEARBORN, Mich. (AP) — Dearborn, Michigan, is ramping up its police presence in response to fallout from an opinion piece that described the city, which has the nation’s highest Muslim population per capita, as “America’s jihad capital.”


Dearborn Mayor Abdullah Hammoud on Friday tweeted that city police increased security at places of worship and major infrastructure points as a “direct result” of a Wall Street Journal opinion piece titled, “Welcome to Dearborn, America’s Jihad Capital.”


Hammoud posted on the X platform, formerly known as Twitter, that the item published Friday “led to an alarming increase in bigoted and Islamophobic rhetoric online targeting the city of Dearborn.”

Steven Stalinsky, executive director of the Middle East Media Research Institute, who authored the opinion piece in the Wall Street Journal, said in an interview with The Associated Press that he wanted to draw attention to protests in Michigan and elsewhere across the U.S. in which people have expressed support for Hamas since the start of the war with Israel.

More than 27,000 Palestinians, mostly women and minors, have been killed in Gaza since Hamas attacked Israel on Oct. 7, according to the Health Ministry in the Hamas-ruled territory. Hamas killed more than 1,200 people and kidnapped about 250 more, mostly civilians, in the attack.


“Nothing in my article was written to instigate any sort of hate,” Stalinsky said. “This is a moment for counterterrorism officials to be concerned.”

The Wall Street Journal did not immediately respond Sunday to requests for comment left by The Associated Press via email and voicemail. An email sent to a Dearborn spokeswoman also was not immediately returned Sunday.



In a tweet referencing Dearborn on Saturday, President Joe Biden condemned “hate in all forms.”

“Americans know that blaming a group of people based on the words of a small few is wrong,” Biden’s post read. “That’s exactly what can lead to Islamophobia and anti-Arab hate, and it shouldn’t happen to the residents of Dearborn — or any American town.”
if it makes america feel better, our country should be renamed shitholistan. :( ;)
 

spaminator

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‘Woke Kindergarten’ program teaches kids to confront white supremacy, disrupt racism
Author of the article:Denette Wilford
Published Feb 05, 2024 • Last updated 2 days ago • 2 minute read
Akiea "Ki" Gross, creator of Woke Kindergarten program being taught at Glassbrook Elementary in Hayward, Calif.
Akiea "Ki" Gross, creator of Woke Kindergarten program being taught at Glassbrook Elementary in Hayward, Calif.
A Bay Area elementary school spent $250,000 on a “Woke Kindergarten” program where teachers are trained to educate their students about uprooting white supremacy and disrupting racism and oppression.


But the program, funded through a federal program to help the country’s lowest–performing schools, is failing as the students’ literacy and numeracy rates have plummeted, the San Francisco Chronicle reported.


The program’s teachers are trained on specific concepts and curriculum, and available to any of the 474 students at Glassbrook Elementary in Hayward, Calif., about 30 kilometres southeast of Oakland.

However, student achievement has plunged, leaving some teachers questioning whether the money should have better spent on its students.

Less than 4% of the students are proficient in math and about 12% are proficient in English, a decline of about 4% in each category, according to the publication.


The philosophy of “Woke Kindergarten” is “abolitionist education,” teaching the children that the current state of the education system is steeped in racism and oppression and cannot be reformed.

Woke Kindergarten’s social media pages are not subtle about its beliefs, including posts of anti-Israel messages and the abolishment of police.



Students are also taught a “woke word of the day” to educate them on “language of the resistance” and to “introduce children to liberatory vocabulary in a way that they can easily digest, understand and most importantly, use in their critiques of the system.”

Woke Kindergarten was founded by non-binary early educator Akiea “Ki” Gross, who uses they/them pronouns.



On its Instagram account, the bio of which reads “abolitionist early learning ecosystem, all power to the little people,” Gross defined “ceasefire” as “an order for people with power in places to stop fighting and using weapons to hurt large groups of people. When people use weapons to hurt others, we call that ‘violence.’”

They explained: “One place that people are demanding a permanent ceasefire for is in Palestine because they are being occupied, or controlled, by a made up place called Israel that has settlers called Zionists who are harming and killing the Palestinian people who have always lived on the land.”



Tiger Craven-Neeley, a Glassbrook teacher and white gay man, told the Chronicle he was banned from the Woke Kindergarten training sessions after he asked a trainer what “disrupting whiteness” meant.

“I just want to know, what does that mean for a third-grade classroom?” he asked the publication.

Hayward Superintendent Jason Reimann defended the school’s decision to hire Woke Kindergarten.

“We are in favour 100% of abolishing systems of oppression where they hold our students back,” he told the Chronicle.

He clarified that the program isn’t intended to improve math and literacy scores but, rather, to help students “feel safe and whole” which is “is part and parcel of academic achievement.”
 

spaminator

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Jewish groups decry Robinson’s cabinet exit, as Eby slams ’hateful’ office vandalism
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Dirk Meissner
Published Feb 06, 2024 • Last updated 1 day ago • 4 minute read

VICTORIA — B.C. Premier David Eby has criticized what he’s calling the “hateful” vandalism of the constituency office of former minister Selina Robinson that came hours after she resigned from his cabinet over remarks that angered pro-Palestinian groups and others.


Her exit on Monday has been deplored by Jewish groups, but wasn’t enough to satisfy some of her critics.


Video on social media showed the office covered in signs calling for “intifada revolution” and Robinson’s removal from the NDP caucus, among other messages and Palestinian flags.



“We refuse to have an MLA that’s a racist,” says a voice on the video, posted on Tuesday morning by an account called Canadian Antifa.

Eby responded with a plea for peaceful protest.

“Selina Robinson’s office was vandalized last night, which included hateful messages,” Eby said in a message posted on X, formerly known as Twitter, the same social media platform where the video of the office in Coquitlam, B.C., was shared.

“This is wrong. Peaceful protest cannot include spreading hate.”



Robinson, who is Jewish, stepped down as post-secondary education minister on Monday following a sustained outcry over her comments last week that modern Israel was founded on “a crappy piece of land.”

She announced her resignation from cabinet after critics called her comments racist and Islamophobic. Robinson and Eby said she would remain in the NDP caucus.

The resignation comes amid ongoing tensions and global protests over the Israel-Hamas war, in which thousands have died since Oct. 7, when Hamas militants killed 1,200 people in Israel and took another 250 hostage.

Officials at Robinson’s constituency office were not immediately available for comment.

Robinson’s exit from the NDP cabinet has caused deep concerns from some members of B.C.’s Jewish community who said they had lost an advocate who admitted her mistake and was willing to make amends.


Robinson apologized twice in the days before her resignation, saying “my words were inappropriate, wrong and I now understand how they have contributed to Islamophobia and anti-Palestinian racism.”

But it didn’t quell the criticism, or save her place in the cabinet.

Nico Slobinsky, Pacific vice-president of the Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs, said Robinson’s removal undermined the Jewish community’s confidence in B.C.’s government and signalled that Jewish leaders were held to different standards than others.

Slobinsky said in a statement the Jewish community had lost a strong voice at a time of increasing acts of antisemitism and anti-Israel protests.

“The community is both offended and hurt by what has happened to a great ally and British Columbian,” he said.


“Given this obvious double standard and loss of Jewish representation in cabinet, Premier David Eby must share what steps he is going to take to repair the relationship and restore the community’s trust in him and his government.”

The vandalism at Robinson’s constituency office and the calls for her to resign her seat appear to be organized attempts to force her to leave politics, Slobinsky said in an interview.

“She’s trying to make amends and a small, loud and very aggressive mob keeps harassing her because of being Jewish,” he said. “What that is sending is a chilling message that there is an orchestrated attempt to push Jewish people out of politics. That’s a very dangerous thing for all of us.”

The Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs says it’s a national, non-partisan, non-profit organization whose mission is to preserve and protect Jewish life in Canada and advance policy interests of Canada’s organized Jewish community.


Nine rabbis signed a letter to Eby on Tuesday supporting Robinson and expressing disappointment in the premier’s decision to accept her resignation.

Slobinsky said the rabbis are echoing the frustrations and concerns of the Jewish community to the premier.

“We believe you have capitulated to a small but loud group of people,” said the letter from the Rabbinical Association of Vancouver, chaired by Jonathan Infeld. “This is dangerous for our community and the strength of our province’s democracy.”

The rabbis highlighted an incident on International Holocaust Remembrance Day last month, when Eby’s social media accounts posted messages saying “we stand with the Muslim community throughout Canada on this sorrowful day of remembrance.”


Eby later called it a mistake by a staff member. The rabbis said they were deeply offended but accepted his apology.

Robinson, they said, “did not receive the same empathy.”

“We will remember this day the next time you ask for our trust and support,” said the rabbis.

Robinson triggered the uproar that ended her cabinet career with remarks on Jan. 30 during a panel discussion with other Jewish politicians hosted by B’nai Brith Canada.

She lamented a lack of knowledge by younger people about the foundation of modern Israel.

“They don’t understand it was a crappy piece of land with nothing on it. There were several hundred thousand people but other than that it didn’t produce an economy,” she said.

Eby said Monday that Robinson’s remarks were “belittling” and caused harms that were incompatible with her staying in cabinet.