Donald Trump Announces 2016 White House Bid

The_Foxer

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Here they would not be able to. In your country probably. Which is why verification is do important. Here, if you move, when you file your taxes you indicate the change. If you receive a "card" that doesn't belong to you ie. someone else's name on it or you didn't receive it by voting day you then must provide a current utility bill that matches your ID b4 voting. Whole there's always the chance of something going wrong, I believe the way our system is run is pretty secure.
Correct - there are a number of checks and balances here that prevent that. And if a person did vote twice there would be a record.

Suggestions of voter fraud do come up once in a while but when investigated they're extremely low. As in practically non existent. The us is actually worse for that but even then the amount of fraud is usually not enough to affect anything. But - mail in ballots change that picture, it's harder to verify and harder to even detect any voter fraud.

If someone forces someone else to go to a polling station and vote, they have no way of knowing how that person voted. If however they show up at someone's house and pressure them to send in a mail in ballot, they can see how the person voted before it's sealed or even "vote" themselves and send it in. Whole different class of voting.
 

Tecumsehsbones

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Here they would not be able to. In your country probably. Which is why verification is do important. Here, if you move, when you file your taxes you indicate the change. If you receive a "card" that doesn't belong to you ie. someone else's name on it or you didn't receive it by voting day you then must provide a current utility bill that matches your ID b4 voting. Whole there's always the chance of something going wrong, I believe the way our system is run is pretty secure.
We had that. The Republicans did away with it.
 

spaminator

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Trump fights Twitter ban at U.S. appeals court
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Mike Scarcella
Publishing date:Nov 14, 2022 • 20 hours ago • 1 minute read

Former U.S. President Donald Trump on Monday asked a U.S. appeals court to revive his lawsuit against Twitter Inc challenging his permanent suspension from the platform after his supporters attacked the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021.


Lawyers for Trump, a Republican, told the San Francisco-based 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in a filing that the ban from Twitter marked “overtly partisan censorship” and was “contrary to First Amendment principles deeply rooted in American history and law.”


His lawsuit seeks compensatory and punitive damages and a court order requiring Twitter to “immediately reinstate” his account that was permanently suspended on Jan. 8, 2021.

Trump has vowed to keep posting to his own Truth Social media platform. Twitter’s new owner, billionaire Elon Musk, has said that he would reinstate Trump’s account.

A spokesperson for Trump did not immediately respond to a message seeking comment, and a Twitter spokesperson did not immediately reply.


A lawyer for Trump, John Coale in Washington, told Reuters on Monday, “We want him to have the right to get back on” to Twitter.

Twitter said last year it had permanently suspended Trump’s account “due to the risk of further incitement of violence” after his supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol as it was preparing to certify Democrat Joe Biden’s presidential win.

San Francisco-based U.S. District Judge James Donato in May dismissed Trump’s claim that his ban from Twitter violated speech protections accorded under the U.S. Constitution’s First Amendment.

Donato also denied Trump’s claim that Twitter was serving as a “state actor” when it banned his account.
 

spaminator

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U.S. election denier Kari Lake loses Arizona governor's race, flipping state to Democrats
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Julia Harte
Publishing date:Nov 14, 2022 • 15 hours ago • 3 minute read

Kari Lake, one of the most high-profile Republican candidates in the midterm elections to embrace former President Donald Trump’s false claims of voter fraud in 2020, lost her bid to become the next governor of Arizona, Edison Research projected on Monday.

The closely fought governor’s race between Lake and Democrat Katie Hobbs was one of the most significant in the general election because Arizona is a battleground state and will likely play a pivotal role in the 2024 U.S. presidential election.


Lake’s loss is the latest defeat for a series of candidates endorsed by Trump, who on Tuesday is expected to announce another White House bid.


After the Arizona governor race was called, Hobbs wrote on Twitter: “Democracy is worth the wait.” Lake expressed disdain for the election calls, tweeting that “Arizonans know BS when they see it.”



Lake had vowed to ban the state’s mail-in voting, which conspiracy theorists falsely claim is vulnerable to fraud, fueling distrust among voters about the safety of a voting method used by hundreds of thousands of Americans.

Her defeat capped a triumphant week for Democrats, who defied Republicans’ hopes for a “red wave” in the midterm elections.

Democrats retained their control of the U.S. Senate after keeping seats in the swing states of Arizona and Nevada, with Vice President Kamala Harris holding the tie-breaking vote. The party could win outright majority control if Democratic Senator Raphael Warnock beats Republican challenger Herschel Walker in a Georgia runoff on Dec. 6, bolstering Democratic sway over committees, bills and judicial picks.


The Democratic victories in a swath of gubernatorial, congressional and statehouse elections defied expectations that voters would punish them for record inflation, including high gas and food prices. Instead, Democrats were able to curb their losses, in part by mobilizing voters angry over the U.S. Supreme Court decision to overturn the constitutional right to abortion.

Still, Republicans continued to edge toward control of the House of Representatives. As of Monday, Republicans had won 214 seats and the Democrats 207, with 218 needed for a majority. Control of the House would allow Republicans to stymie President Joe Biden’s legislative agenda.

It could take several days before the outcome of enough House races is known to determine which party will control the 435-seat chamber.


Lake, a former television news anchor, was one of a string of Trump-aligned Republican candidates who lost battleground state races. Voters in Pennsylvania, Michigan and Wisconsin also rejected election deniers in races for governor and other statewide election posts.

Biden narrowly beat Trump in Arizona in the 2020 election. Hobbs, Arizona’s current secretary of state, rose to national prominence when she defended the state’s election results against Trump’s claims of voter fraud.

On Monday, she won the seat currently held by Republican Governor Doug Ducey, who could not seek re-election because of term limits.

Vote-counting in Arizona continued for nearly a week after the Nov. 8 election. Arizona requires voters’ signatures on early ballots to be verified before they are processed. The counting was delayed this year because hundreds of thousands of early ballots were cast at drop boxes on Election Day, officials said.


Lake and Trump had pointed to temporary Election Day problems with electronic vote-counting machines in Maricopa County as evidence that Republican votes were being suppressed.

A judge denied a request to extend polling place hours, saying Republicans had provided no evidence that voters were disenfranchised by the issue.

In a Sunday appearance on Fox News, Lake said the lengthy counting process was “trampling” voters’ rights, and was further evidence of why election administration in Arizona needed to be reformed.

“We can’t be the laughing stock of elections any more here in Arizona, and when I’m governor, I will not allow it,” she said.
 

The_Foxer

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Denying the results of an election is just not a winning strategy. It wasn't for the democrats and it's not for the republicans.
 

Serryah

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Dec 3, 2008
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U.S. election denier Kari Lake loses Arizona governor's race, flipping state to Democrats
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Julia Harte
Publishing date:Nov 14, 2022 • 15 hours ago • 3 minute read

Kari Lake, one of the most high-profile Republican candidates in the midterm elections to embrace former President Donald Trump’s false claims of voter fraud in 2020, lost her bid to become the next governor of Arizona, Edison Research projected on Monday.

The closely fought governor’s race between Lake and Democrat Katie Hobbs was one of the most significant in the general election because Arizona is a battleground state and will likely play a pivotal role in the 2024 U.S. presidential election.


Lake’s loss is the latest defeat for a series of candidates endorsed by Trump, who on Tuesday is expected to announce another White House bid.


After the Arizona governor race was called, Hobbs wrote on Twitter: “Democracy is worth the wait.” Lake expressed disdain for the election calls, tweeting that “Arizonans know BS when they see it.”



Lake had vowed to ban the state’s mail-in voting, which conspiracy theorists falsely claim is vulnerable to fraud, fueling distrust among voters about the safety of a voting method used by hundreds of thousands of Americans.

Her defeat capped a triumphant week for Democrats, who defied Republicans’ hopes for a “red wave” in the midterm elections.

Democrats retained their control of the U.S. Senate after keeping seats in the swing states of Arizona and Nevada, with Vice President Kamala Harris holding the tie-breaking vote. The party could win outright majority control if Democratic Senator Raphael Warnock beats Republican challenger Herschel Walker in a Georgia runoff on Dec. 6, bolstering Democratic sway over committees, bills and judicial picks.


The Democratic victories in a swath of gubernatorial, congressional and statehouse elections defied expectations that voters would punish them for record inflation, including high gas and food prices. Instead, Democrats were able to curb their losses, in part by mobilizing voters angry over the U.S. Supreme Court decision to overturn the constitutional right to abortion.

Still, Republicans continued to edge toward control of the House of Representatives. As of Monday, Republicans had won 214 seats and the Democrats 207, with 218 needed for a majority. Control of the House would allow Republicans to stymie President Joe Biden’s legislative agenda.

It could take several days before the outcome of enough House races is known to determine which party will control the 435-seat chamber.


Lake, a former television news anchor, was one of a string of Trump-aligned Republican candidates who lost battleground state races. Voters in Pennsylvania, Michigan and Wisconsin also rejected election deniers in races for governor and other statewide election posts.

Biden narrowly beat Trump in Arizona in the 2020 election. Hobbs, Arizona’s current secretary of state, rose to national prominence when she defended the state’s election results against Trump’s claims of voter fraud.

On Monday, she won the seat currently held by Republican Governor Doug Ducey, who could not seek re-election because of term limits.

Vote-counting in Arizona continued for nearly a week after the Nov. 8 election. Arizona requires voters’ signatures on early ballots to be verified before they are processed. The counting was delayed this year because hundreds of thousands of early ballots were cast at drop boxes on Election Day, officials said.


Lake and Trump had pointed to temporary Election Day problems with electronic vote-counting machines in Maricopa County as evidence that Republican votes were being suppressed.

A judge denied a request to extend polling place hours, saying Republicans had provided no evidence that voters were disenfranchised by the issue.

In a Sunday appearance on Fox News, Lake said the lengthy counting process was “trampling” voters’ rights, and was further evidence of why election administration in Arizona needed to be reformed.

“We can’t be the laughing stock of elections any more here in Arizona, and when I’m governor, I will not allow it,” she said.

Considering the denial was even before the election was held, not sure why anyone's shocked.
 

spaminator

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New Pence book details split with Trump
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Jill Colvin
Publishing date:Nov 15, 2022 • 1 day ago • 5 minute read


NEW YORK — Former U.S. Vice President Mike Pence blames Donald Trump for endangering his family “and all those serving at the Capitol” on Jan. 6 in a new memoir released Tuesday.


In “So Help Me God,” Pence recounts, for the first time in his own words, the Republican former president’s extraordinary effort to push him to overturn the results of the 2020 election and shares his account of the day thousands of rioters stormed the Capitol, with some chanting “Hang Mike Pence.”


“They had come to protest the result of the election and to prevent Congress from fulfilling its responsibility to open and count the Electoral College votes,” Pence writes. “And, as I later learned, many had come looking for me.”

The book, which traces Pence’s life in politics – from serving as youth coordinator for a local Democratic Party to watching then-Vice President Al Gore certify his election loss days after Pence had been sworn in as a member of Congress – largely defends Trump, glossing over and whitewashing many of his most contentious episodes. “I had always been loyal to President Donald Trump,” the book begins.


But Pence, who spent years refusing to publicly criticize his old boss, makes clear that Jan. 6, 2021, was a breaking point in which, he writes, Trump’s “reckless words had endangered my family and all those serving at the Capitol.”

“For four years, we had a close working relationship. It did not end well,” Pence writes, summing up their time in the White House. Still, he adds, “we parted amicably when our service to the nation drew to a close. In the months that followed, we spoke from time to time, but when the president returned to the rhetoric that he was using before that tragic day and began to publicly criticize those of us who defended the Constitution, I decided it would be best to go our separate ways.”

The book, published by Simon & Schuster, comes as Pence appears increasingly likely to run for president in 2024, a move that would put him in direct conflict with Trump, who is expected to formally launch his own reelection campaign in Florida on Tuesday night.


Pence, who in the book never directly states that Democrat Joe Biden won fairly, writes that when Trump first suggested holding a rally in Washington on Jan. 6, the day Pence was set to preside over the election’s certification, he thought it was a good idea. “My first thought was that a rally that day might be useful as a way to call even more attention to the proceedings on the floor of the House and Senate,” he writes.

Instead, Pence describes sitting in the Senate chamber and presiding over the certification when the Senate parliamentarian leaned over to inform him that rioters had breached the building and a member of his Secret Service detail rushing over to insist they leave. Pence refused to vacate the building and was instead ushered to a Senate loading dock, where he spent hours, surrounded by staff and family members, making calls to military and congressional leaders to coordinate the government’s response, as the president – who never bothered to check in on Pence’s safety – sat cloistered, watching TV.


“All around was a blur of motion and chaos: security and police officers directing people to safety, staffers shouting and running for shelter. I could see the intensity in the eyes of the Secret Service detail; it was audible, too, in the voices of the Capitol Police. I could hear the fall of footsteps and angry chanting,” Pence writes. Still, Pence insists he was “not afraid,” only angry at what was unfolding.

At 2:24 p.m., as Pence remained in hiding, Trump fired off that infamous tweet saying Pence “didn’t have the courage to do what should have been done to protect our Country and our Constitution.”

“I just shook my head,” Pence said he responded. “The truth was, as reckless as the president’s tweet was, I really didn’t have time for it. Rioters were ransacking the Capitol. … The president had decided to be part of the problem. I was determined to be part of the solution. I ignored the tweet and got back to work.”


Pence also describes Trump’s campaign to pressure him to reject the results of the election by rejecting Electoral College votes or sending them back to the states, even though the Constitution makes clear that the vice president’s role is purely ceremonial.

During one lunch on Nov. 16, 2020, Pence said he told Trump that “if the legal challenges came up short and if he was unwilling to concede, he could simply accept the results of the elections, move forward with the transition, and start a political comeback, winning the Senate runoffs in Georgia, the governor’s race in Virginia in 2021, and the House and Senate in 2022.”

“That accomplished, I said, he could run for president in 2024 and win,” Pence writes. “He seemed unmoved, even weary, at the prospect.”


“‘I don’t know, 2024 is so far off,”‘ Pence writes that Trump told him “before returning to the status of election challenges in various states.”

At another lunch, Pence said he encouraged Trump “not to look at the election ‘as a loss – just an intermission”‘ and said if he “still came up short” after exhausting every legal option, Trump should “take a bow” and later run again.

“He nodded, pointed at me as if to say, ‘That’s worth considering,’ and walked into the back hallway,” Pence writes. “I will always wish he had.”

But as the lawsuits Trump’s legal team was pushing continued to fail, Pence writes that Trump’s mood darkened and he became increasingly irate. Pence says Trump berated him, telling him, “You’re too honest,” and predicting that “hundreds of thousands are gonna hate your guts” and “people are gonna think you’re stupid.”


“As the days wore on, it was becoming clear that there would be a real cost to me politically when I presided over the certification of the 2020 election,” Pence writes. “I always knew that I did not possess the authority to overturn the election. I knew it would be hurtful to my friend for me to participate in the certification. But my duty was clear.”

After the Capitol was cleared of the rioters, Congress reconvened and Pence presided over the certification of his and Trump’s loss. For several days the two men did not speak. But when they finally met, five days later, Pence said they spent more than 90 minutes together, alone.

“I told him that I had prayed for him for the past four and a half years, and I encouraged him to pray,” Pence said he told Trump. “‘Jesus can help you through this,’ I said. ‘Call on Him.’ He didn’t say anything.”

“With genuine sadness in his voice, the president then mused, ‘What if we hadn’t had the rally? What if they hadn’t gone to the Capitol?’ Then he said, ‘It’s too terrible to end like this.”‘
 

spaminator

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Donald Trump defeats niece Mary Trump in lawsuit over inheritance
Case had roots in 1981 death of her father Fred Trump Jr., Donald Trump's older brother, who left Mary, then 16, a profitable real estate portfolio

Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Jonathan Stempel
Publishing date:Nov 15, 2022 • 1 day ago • 2 minute read

NEW YORK — Donald Trump defeated his niece Mary Trump in a lawsuit where she accused the former U.S. president and two of his siblings of defrauding her out of a multimillion-dollar inheritance.


In a decision on Monday, Justice Robert Reed of a New York state court in Manhattan said Mary Trump released her claims against her relatives in a 2001 settlement over the estate of Donald Trump’s father Fred Trump Sr.


Reed’s decision came the same day a federal judge in Manhattan handed Donald Trump another legal victory, dismissing a lawsuit by his former lawyer Michael Cohen over being returned to prison in alleged retaliation for writing a tell-all memoir.

Mary Trump’s case had its roots in the 1981 death of her father Fred Trump Jr., Donald Trump’s older brother, who left Mary, then 16, a profitable real estate portfolio.

Now a 57-year-old psychologist, Mary Trump claimed that her uncles Donald and Robert Trump and aunt Maryanne Trump Barry were supposed to protect her interests but instead “squeezed” her out of tens of millions of dollars.


She claimed she learned of the fraud only when the New York Times published a 2018 Pulitzer Prize-winning probe into Donald Trump’s finances, including his alleged efforts to avoid taxes.

But the judge said the settlement, which gave Mary Trump more than $2.7 million, was neither unfair, nor “a case where defendants’ alleged threats precluded the exercise of plaintiff’s free will.”

He also said the settlement “clearly and unambiguously” released the defendants from Mary Trump’s claims.

“Yesterday’s decision is both incorrect and disappointing,” Mary Trump’s lawyer Roberta Kaplan said in a statement. “Given the age of the defendants, not to mention the fact that one of them intends to announce today that he is running again for President, we intend to seek an expedited appeal.”


Donald Trump is 76, and Barry, a retired federal judge, is 85. Robert Trump died in August 2020.

James Kiley, a lawyer for Donald Trump and Robert Trump’s estate, said in a statement that “despite the plaintiff’s thinly veiled attempt to try the case in public and politicize her cause,” the court correctly followed decades of precedents and “dispensed justice blindly without fear or favour.”

Barry’s lawyer Gary Freidman declined to comment.

Some of Mary Trump’s allegations about Donald Trump were in her own 2020 tell-all, “Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World’s Most Dangerous Man.” Her book and Cohen’s “Disloyal: A Memoir” were best-sellers.

Trump has accused his niece of trying to cash in on the family name.

He is separately suing Mary Trump, the Times and three reporters for more than $100 million, saying they plotted to exploit his tax records to fulfill personal vendettas and their desires for acclaim and money at his political expense.

The cases are Mary L. Trump v Donald J. Trump et al, New York State Supreme Court, New York County, No. 654698/2020, and Donald J. Trump v Mary L. Trump et al in the same court, No. 453299/2021.
 
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spaminator

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Donald Trump launches 2024 U.S. presidential run, getting jump on rivals
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Steve Holland and Andy Sullivan
Publishing date:Nov 15, 2022 • 23 hours ago • 4 minute read
Former U.S. President Donald Trump announces that he will once again run for U.S. president in the 2024 U.S. presidential election during an event at his Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Fla., Nov. 15, 2022.
Former U.S. President Donald Trump announces that he will once again run for U.S. president in the 2024 U.S. presidential election during an event at his Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Fla., Nov. 15, 2022.
PALM BEACH — Donald Trump, who has mounted relentless attacks on the integrity of U.S. voting since his 2020 election defeat, on Tuesday launched a bid to regain the presidency in 2024, aiming to pre-empt potential Republican rivals.


Seeking a potential rematch with Democratic President Joe Biden, Trump made his announcement at his Mar-a-Lago estate in Florida a week after midterm elections in which Republicans failed to win as many seats in Congress as they had hoped.


In a speech lasting little more than an hour, Trump spoke to hundreds of supporters in a ballroom decorated with chandeliers and lined with American flags.

“In order to make America great again, I am tonight announcing my candidacy for president of the United States,” Trump said to the phone-waving crowd, which included family members, donors and former staffers.

Trump steered clear of the name-calling that has marked other public appearances, opting instead for a critique of Biden’s presidency and a review of what Trump said were the policy achievements of his own time in office.


“Two years ago we were a great nation and soon we will be a great nation again,” he said.

Trump laid out familiar dark themes from his playbook, denouncing migrants – “We’re being poisoned” – and portraying American cities as crime-ridden “cesspools of blood.”

He said he would push for the death penalty for drug dealers and rehire members of the military who had been dismissed for refusing to get the COVID-19 vaccine.

Although he assailed the U.S. election process, Trump did not use his speech to revive his false claims of massive voter fraud in 2020 and did not mention the violent attempt by his supporters on Jan. 6, 2021, to prevent Congress from certifying Biden’s victory.

On a trip to Indonesia, Biden said “not really” when asked if he had a reaction to Trump’s announcement. On Twitter, he posted a video criticizing Trump’s record in office.


LONG ROAD
There is a long road ahead before the Republican nominee is formally selected in the summer of 2024, with the first state-level contests more than a year away.

Trump’s announcement comes earlier than usual even in a country known for protracted presidential campaigns, and signals his interest in discouraging other possible contenders such as Florida Governor Ron DeSantis or his own former vice president, Mike Pence, from making a bid for the Republican Party’s nomination.

DeSantis handily won re-election as governor last week. Pence has sought to distance himself from Trump while promoting a new book. Other potential Republican presidential hopefuls include Virginia Governor Glenn Youngkin, Texas Governor Greg Abbott, former South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley and former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo.


Trump played an active role in the midterms, recruiting and promoting candidates who echoed his false claims that the 2020 election was stolen from him through widespread voting fraud.

But many of his candidates in key battleground states lost, prompting some prominent Republicans to openly blame him for promoting weak candidates who derailed the party’s hopes of taking control of the Senate.

Control of the House of Representatives remains up in the air, but Republicans are on track to win a razor-thin majority.

Trump will seek his party’s nomination even as he faces trouble on several fronts, including a criminal investigation into his handling of government documents, a congressional subpoena related to his role in the Jan. 6, 2021, assault. Trump has called the investigations politically motivated and has denied wrongdoing.


Trump, 76, is seeking to become only the second U.S. president in history to serve non-consecutive terms, after Grover Cleveland, whose second stint ended in 1897. Biden, 79, said last week he intends to run for re-election and will likely make a final decision by early next year.

In an Edison Research exit poll, seven out of 10 midterm voters expressed the view that Biden, who remains deeply unpopular, should not run again. In the same poll, six of 10 respondents said they had an unfavourable opinion of Trump.

TRUMP’S PRESIDENCY
During his turbulent 2017-2021 presidency, Trump defied democratic norms and promoted “America First” nationalism while presenting himself as a right-wing populist. He cut taxes and secured a conservative majority on the Supreme Court. He alienated U.S. allies and praised authoritarian leaders, including Russia’s Vladimir Putin.


He became the first U.S. president to be impeached twice, though congressional Democrats failed to remove him from office.

At a rally that preceded the Capitol attack, Trump urged supporters to march on Congress to “stop the steal,” but the mob that subsequently stormed the Capitol failed to prevent Congress from certifying Biden’s election victory.

Even though court and state election officials rejected Trump’s false election claims, about two-thirds of Republican voters believe Biden’s victory was illegitimate, according to Reuters/Ipsos polling.

Trump has elicited passionate support from many Americans, especially white men, Christian conservatives, rural residents and people without a college education. Critics accuse Trump of pursuing policies built around “white grievance” in a nation with a growing non-white population.

The political landscape has changed dramatically since he won the presidency in 2016 and some in his party, including major donors, are exhausted by the drama surrounding him.

Ivanka Trump was not at the event, although her husband Jared Kushner was along with her brothers Don Jr. and Eric. She issued a statement saying: “I do not plan to be involved in politics. While I will always love and support my father, going forward I will do so outside the political arena.”
 
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spaminator

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Ivanka Trump bows out of politics as father runs for third bid for president
'While I will always love and support my father, going forward I will do so outside the political arena'

Author of the article:Bang Showbiz
Bang Showbiz
Publishing date:Nov 16, 2022 • 1 day ago • 2 minute read

Ivanka Trump has quit politics as her father, Donald Trump, confirmed he’s running for U.S. president again.


The former senior White House adviser in Trump’s administration will not be involved in his latest campaign to run for the White House in 2024, as she wishes to “prioritize” her children and continue to lead a “private life.”


“I love my father very much. This time around, I am choosing to prioritize my young children and the private life we are creating as a family. I do not plan to be involved in politics,” Ivanka Trump announced on Instagram.

Ivanka Trump says she will not be involved in her father’s latest campaign to run for the White House in 2024.
Ivanka Trump says she will not be involved in her father’s latest campaign to run for the White House in 2024.
“While I will always love and support my father, going forward I will do so outside the political arena.

“I am grateful to have had the honor of serving the American people and I will always be proud of many of our Administration’s accomplishments. (sic)”

The 41-year-old businesswoman’s spouse, Jared Kushner, also acted as a senior White House adviser, but it’s not known if he will continue in the role.


The former United States President, who held office from 2017 to 2021, promised to “fight like no one has ever fought before” during an impassioned speech at his Mar-a-Lago estate on Tuesday night.

“In order to make America great and glorious again, I am tonight announcing my candidacy for president of the United States,” he said.

Trump, 76, took aim at current president Joe Biden, saying the country had endured “pain, hardship, anxiety and despair” under his leadership.

“Two years ago we were a great nation and soon we will be a great nation again,” he added.

His paperwork to confirm his candidacy, which comes after some of his aides and allies urged him to wait until after the midterm election results, was filed with the Federal Election Committee just before his speech.


This marks Trump’s third run for the presidency, after winning in 2016 and then losing to Biden four years later.

He is the only president to be impeached twice, with the first coming in 2019 after the House of Representatives impeached him over his dealings with Ukraine.

The following year, he was acquitted by the Senate, and then in January 2021 he was impeached again and charged with “incitement of insurrection” over the Capitol riot.

Trump, who is also the first president to be acquitted twice, had insisted without evidence that the 2020 election was stolen from him, and his followers then stormed the Capitol building in an attempt to stop Congress from certifying the results in Biden’s favour.

Trump, who lost by more than seven million votes and hasn’t been able to provide evidence of widespread fraud, has continued to claim he won the 2020 election.
1668714128692.png
 
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spaminator

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'The Simpsons' predicted Donald Trump's 2024 presidential run
'In order to make America great again, I am tonight announcing my candidacy'

Author of the article:Mark Daniell
Publishing date:Nov 16, 2022 • 1 day ago • 3 minute read
The Simpsons predicted Donald Trump would run for the 2024 presidency of the United States back in 2015.
The Simpsons predicted Donald Trump would run for the 2024 presidency of the United States back in 2015. PHOTO BY AL JEAN /Twitter
There’s no end to The Simpsons’ crystal ball when it comes to predicting the future.

On Wednesday, Al Jean, producer on the long-running animated series, tweeted how the show forecast Donald Trump’s announcement that he will run for president in 2024 by sharing an image of Homer Simpson and a campaign sign that read “Trump 2024.”




“As predicted in 2015,” the producer tweeted.

Following his 2020 defeat, Trump launched a bid to regain the presidency in 2024 on Tuesday night.

“In order to make America great again, I am tonight announcing my candidacy for president of the United States,” Trump said to supporters.

On social media, one fan reacted to the prophecy by tweeting, “I need The Simpsons to predict the following: world peace … an end to world hunger and inequality, an end to billionaires.”

“How does The Simpsons keep predicting this s—?” another person noted. “It honestly kinda scares me at this point.”

The Simpsons has an eerie track record when it comes to predicting the future. In a 2000 episode, titled Bart to the Future, the show teased Trump’s first presidency.


In the flash-forward episode, Bart takes a trip to the White House to visit his sister, Lisa, who has grown up to become “the first straight female” president of the United States.

Lisa is meeting with her inner circle in the Oval Office when Bart visits, and can be heard complaining about the state her predecessor, a “President Trump,” left the country’s economy in.

Elsewhere, in March 2020, fans pointed to a May 6, 1993, episode titled Marge in Chains — which featured a fictitious disease dubbed the “Osaka Flu” that everyone contracts after an ill factory worker in Japan coughs on boxes that are shipped to Springfield — as proof that the series saw the coronavirus pandemic coming.

Later in that same episode, when the townspeople of Springfield demand a cure, they accidentally topple a crate marked “Killer Bees” — which some fans took as proof the series also foresaw “murder hornets.”


Bill Oakley, a co-writer on the show, downplayed the notion that the series acts as a modern-day Nostradamus telling The Hollywood Reporter, “It’s mainly just coincidence because the episodes are so old that history repeats itself. Most of these episodes are based on things that happened in the ’60s, ’70s or ’80s that we knew about.”

But over the years, The Simpsons has seemed to have had a crystal ball when it comes to foretelling current events. In addition to name-checking Trump in a 2000 episode, the program is credited with predicting smart watches (1995’s Lisa’s Wedding), Lady Gaga’s Super Bowl performance (2012’s Lisa Goes Gaga), a Beatle responding to overdue fan mail (1991’s Brush with Greatness), the Siegfried and Roy tiger attack (1993’s $pringfield) and the U.S. winning gold in curling at the 2018 Olympics (2010’s Boy Meets Curl).

But show writers haven’t always been right. While 1999 episode floated the possibility that the San Francisco 49ers would win the 2020 Super Bowl, they lost that year to the Kansas City Chiefs.

Created by Matt Groening, The Simpsons, which is the longest running scripted series airing in primetime, is currently in its 34th season.

mdaniell@postmedia.com


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spaminator

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New York Post trolls Trump announcement to run for president again
Florida Man meme used to mock former U.S. president

Author of the article:postmedia News
Publishing date:Nov 16, 2022 • 23 hours ago • 1 minute read


Donald Trump’s announcement to run for U.S. president again barely made the front page of the New York Post on Wednesday.


Instead of being massive news, the type Trump so craves, Trump instead was mostly covered for the low-key reaction to his announcement, made Tuesday in Palm Springs, Florida.


Most of the front page was taken up by coverages of crime stories in New York City. There was only a small, all-caps throw to deep in the paper at the bottom of the cover with the trolling words: “Florida man makes announcement.”

“Florida Man” is a popular internet meme referring to “an alleged prevalence of male persons performing irrational or absurd actions in the US state of Florida.”


By not even naming Trump and then using him as part of the meme, the paper mocked the former U.S. president.

And they weren’t done. They posted an online story Wednesday noting how little coverage the announcement got from media outlets.

“It was not must-see TV,” the article began. “Donald Trump’s prime-time declaration that he is running for president for the third straight time was ignored by network news outlets and only partially ran on CNN and Fox News Channel.

“The one-term president ended months of speculation about throwing his hat back in the ring and announced his intention to get his old job back in front of hundreds of cheering supporters at his Mar-a-Lago resort.”
 

spaminator

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Facebook still banning Trump - for now - despite campaign
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
David Klepper
Publishing date:Nov 16, 2022 • 18 hours ago • 2 minute read

Donald Trump may be running for president, but he still can’t use Facebook.


The social media platform has no plans to reinstate Trump’s account following the former president’s announcement that he will seek a second term in the White House, the company confirmed Wednesday. Trump was kicked off Facebook following the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the U.S. Capitol.


Trump may not have to wait long to get back on the site, however. His suspension from Facebook is set to be reconsidered in January, two years after it was first imposed.

One change will be immediate: As a candidate, Trump will no longer be subject to Facebook fact checks. That’s because under Facebook rules, comments by elected officials and candidates for office aren’t subject to fact checks on its site. The Associated Press participates in Facebook’s independent fact-checking program.


Throughout his tenure as president, Trump’s use of social media posed a significant challenge to major social media platforms trying to balance the public’s need to hear from their elected leaders with worries about misinformation, harassment and incitement of violence.

Following the Jan. 6 riot, Trump was also kicked off Snapchat, Twitter and Instagram, which is owned by Facebook parent company Meta. Trump’s ability to post videos to his YouTube channel was suspended.

YouTube spokeswoman Ivy Choi said Wednesday the company had no plans to lift the suspension.

Twitter’s new owner, Elon Musk, has said he disagreed with the platform’s decision to bar Trump following the Jan. 6 attack. Musk said no announcement about reinstating banned users will be made until a content moderation council has reviewed the issue


Twitter did not respond to questions about whether Trump’s candidacy will impact the decision. Since his suspension, Trump has started his own social media platform, TruthSocial, and said he has no plans to rejoin Twitter if allowed.

The platforms would be justified if they extend their restrictions on Trump or make them permanent, said Heidi Beirich, founder of the Global Project Against Hate and Extremism and a member of the Real Facebook Oversight Board, a group that has criticized Meta’s response to extremist content and misinformation.

“The big problem is treating candidates as if they’re in a special category and deserve special treatment,” Beirich said. “If you have a set of rules, it should apply to everyone. The decision shouldn’t be a struggle.”

Facebook initially placed a 24-hour suspension on Trump’s account on Jan. 6 after he praised the rioters who stormed the Capitol. Facebook creator and CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced an indefinite suspension on Jan. 7, adding that “the risks of allowing the President to continue to use our service during this period are simply too great.”

The company’s quasi-independent oversight board upheld the ban but directed Facebook to set a time limit. The ban is now set to expire Jan. 7, 2023.
 

The_Foxer

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I think he'll make a lot of splash and do his usual bull in a china shop routine ... but i don't think he'll win the nomination this time. I think ron will step in and trump will scare off most of the little guys this time out and in the end trump will just seem too divisive to too many republicans, and he'll lose (becuase it was RIGGED!! COUNT THE VOTES AGAIN!)

i think if he hadn't done the whole 'i never lost' thing he'd have had a much better chance.
 

Twin_Moose

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Twin Moose Creek
I think he'll make a lot of splash and do his usual bull in a china shop routine ... but i don't think he'll win the nomination this time. I think ron will step in and trump will scare off most of the little guys this time out and in the end trump will just seem too divisive to too many republicans, and he'll lose (becuase it was RIGGED!! COUNT THE VOTES AGAIN!)

i think if he hadn't done the whole 'i never lost' thing he'd have had a much better chance.
Trump will be nominated and the establishment (swamp) is scared shitless