COVID-19 'Pandemic'

spaminator

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Toronto health authorities investigate first suspected monkeypox case
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Publishing date:May 21, 2022 • 12 hours ago • 1 minute read • 16 Comments
This 2003 electron microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows mature, oval-shaped monkeypox virions, left, and spherical immature virions, right, obtained from a sample of human skin associated with the 2003 prairie dog outbreak. Toronto Public Health says it is investigating a first suspected case of monkeypox in the province. Health officials say it's a man in his 40s who had contact with someone who recently travelled to Montreal.
This 2003 electron microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows mature, oval-shaped monkeypox virions, left, and spherical immature virions, right, obtained from a sample of human skin associated with the 2003 prairie dog outbreak. Toronto Public Health says it is investigating a first suspected case of monkeypox in the province. Health officials say it's a man in his 40s who had contact with someone who recently travelled to Montreal. PHOTO BY AP-CDC, CYNTHIA S. GOLDSMITH, RUSSELL REGNER /THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Toronto Public Health says it is investigating Ontario’s first suspected case of monkeypox.


Health officials say the case is a man in his 40s who had contact with someone who had recently travelled to Montreal.

The man recovering in hospital and his condition is stable.

The risk posed by monkeypox is low, and thus far all five lab-confirmed cases in Canada are in Montreal, where health officials said Saturday there are 15 cases under investigation.

Monkeypox is a rare disease that comes from the same family of viruses that causes smallpox, which the World Health Organization declared eradicated around the globe in 1980.

In general, monkeypox does not spread easily between people and is transmitted through prolonged close contact, including direct contact with an infected person’s respiratory droplets, bodily fluids or sores.

Monkeypox is typically milder than smallpox and can cause fever, headache, muscle aches, exhaustion, swollen lymph nodes and lesions all over the body.
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pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
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Toronto health authorities investigate first suspected monkeypox case
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Publishing date:May 21, 2022 • 12 hours ago • 1 minute read • 16 Comments
This 2003 electron microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows mature, oval-shaped monkeypox virions, left, and spherical immature virions, right, obtained from a sample of human skin associated with the 2003 prairie dog outbreak. Toronto Public Health says it is investigating a first suspected case of monkeypox in the province. Health officials say it's a man in his 40s who had contact with someone who recently travelled to Montreal.
This 2003 electron microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows mature, oval-shaped monkeypox virions, left, and spherical immature virions, right, obtained from a sample of human skin associated with the 2003 prairie dog outbreak. Toronto Public Health says it is investigating a first suspected case of monkeypox in the province. Health officials say it's a man in his 40s who had contact with someone who recently travelled to Montreal. PHOTO BY AP-CDC, CYNTHIA S. GOLDSMITH, RUSSELL REGNER /THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Toronto Public Health says it is investigating Ontario’s first suspected case of monkeypox.


Health officials say the case is a man in his 40s who had contact with someone who had recently travelled to Montreal.

The man recovering in hospital and his condition is stable.

The risk posed by monkeypox is low, and thus far all five lab-confirmed cases in Canada are in Montreal, where health officials said Saturday there are 15 cases under investigation.

Monkeypox is a rare disease that comes from the same family of viruses that causes smallpox, which the World Health Organization declared eradicated around the globe in 1980.

In general, monkeypox does not spread easily between people and is transmitted through prolonged close contact, including direct contact with an infected person’s respiratory droplets, bodily fluids or sores.

Monkeypox is typically milder than smallpox and can cause fever, headache, muscle aches, exhaustion, swollen lymph nodes and lesions all over the body.
View attachment 13864
Head for the hills . We are all going to die .
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
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Rumour has it , that they all live in Nelson .
Not so much anymore. There are dozens of dope farms in foreclosure in the Kootenays. Both licensed and quasi "med" operations. I'm paying $50-$65 an oz for premo. There isn't any money in growing.

Day of reckoning’ coming for Kootenay cannabis growers as pressures mount​

By John Boivin, Local Journalism Initiative ReporterValley Voice
Thu., April 21,

Efforts to build a legal cannabis economy in the West Kootenay are faltering, and the legacy industry could face imminent collapse, say local industry insiders and analysts.

“We’re extremely concerned this whole industry is going to fold,” says Shannon Ross, CEO of Antidote Processing. “And with it there’ll be thousands of jobs lost in this region.”

“Have we hit the bottom? I think we’re close to it, and I certainly think we’re in for some pain for the next year, as more people close shop,” says Slocan Valley Economic Development Coordinator Ron LeBlanc.
 

Dixie Cup

House Member
Sep 16, 2006
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Edmonton
Not so much anymore. There are dozens of dope farms in foreclosure in the Kootenays. Both licensed and quasi "med" operations. I'm paying $50-$65 an oz for premo. There isn't any money in growing.

Day of reckoning’ coming for Kootenay cannabis growers as pressures mount​

By John Boivin, Local Journalism Initiative ReporterValley Voice
Thu., April 21,

Efforts to build a legal cannabis economy in the West Kootenay are faltering, and the legacy industry could face imminent collapse, say local industry insiders and analysts.

“We’re extremely concerned this whole industry is going to fold,” says Shannon Ross, CEO of Antidote Processing. “And with it there’ll be thousands of jobs lost in this region.”

“Have we hit the bottom? I think we’re close to it, and I certainly think we’re in for some pain for the next year, as more people close shop,” says Slocan Valley Economic Development Coordinator Ron LeBlanc.
Why? What's the reason? Gov't regulations or something else?
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
100,854
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Moccasin Flats
Why? What's the reason? Gov't regulations or something else?
Simple reason for Govt. To take back the money made illegally for decades that is now wrapped up in turnkey operations sitting idle or losing money having to sell underground for $600 an lb.

Govt hates competition.
 
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Dixie Cup

House Member
Sep 16, 2006
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Edmonton
Simple reason for Govt. To take back the money made illegally for decades that is now wrapped up in turnkey operations sitting idle or losing money having to sell underground for $600 an lb.

Govt hates competition.
oh, so these are not "sanctioned" grow ops! Ah, I see! Makes sense now.
 

Dixie Cup

House Member
Sep 16, 2006
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Edmonton
This is so frustrating, I can't imagine what the growers are going through.

Because of some physical issues, I take CBD and THC on a daily basis. I didn't want to initially, but when I found out how much "chemical medications" I would need to take, I thought I'd try something else. It has been a lifesaver for me. The CBD helps with the stiffness I experience every day, especially first thing in the morning and the THC helps me with sleep which wasn't happening previously (due to the stiffness). Between the two of them, I can at least experience some activity & a reasonable quality of life. It did take me awhile to figure out the strain and the amounts but thankfully it's worked out.

How could have the government made things better (now or in future) ? Who knows - it was new to all of us. I suspect that regulations have a lot to do with the issues and that's what governments are good at - regulating, often for no reason whatsoever.

Now that cannabin is legal, WTF?? Regulations are needlessly arbitrary and often not required.
 
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spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
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Boris Johnson faces new threat of confidence vote over lockdown parties
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Andrew Macaskill
Publishing date:May 31, 2022 • 22 hours ago • 2 minute read • Join the conversation

LONDON — British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is facing the growing threat of a confidence vote as two more lawmakers suggested they had lost faith in his government over the “partygate” scandal and a former party leader said he could be challenged next week.


John Stevenson, a Conservative member of parliament, said he has been “deeply disappointed” by the rule-breaking parties during the COVID-19 national lockdowns and called for the prime minister to put himself forward for a vote of confidence as a way to “draw the line” under the issues.

“Sadly, the prime minister appears unwilling to bring matters to a head,” Stevenson said in a statement. “Therefore, the only option is for the Conservative MPs to facilitate a vote of confidence. I have already taken the appropriate action.”

A damning official report published last week detailed a series of illegal parties at Johnson’s Downing Street office during COVID-19 lockdowns, prompting a new wave of calls for the Conservative prime minister to step aside.


More than 25 Conservative lawmakers have called on Johnson to resign, while at least a further six have criticized his conduct but stopped short of saying he should resign.

Should Johnson lose a confidence vote, he would be removed as prime minister.

William Hague, who led the Conservative Party from 1997 to 2001, said Johnson is likely to face a vote of confidence by the end of June and could face one as early as next week when members of parliament return from recess.

Hague said the report by a senior civil servant into the illegal parties represented a kind of “slow fuse explosion” and with more Conservative lawmakers publicly criticizing Johnson “the fuse is getting closer to the dynamite.”

“Johnson is in real trouble here,” he told Times Radio. The party is “moving towards, either next week or around the end of June, they are moving towards having a ballot.”


Andrea Leadsom, a former Cabinet minister and prominent Brexiteer, accused Johnson of “unacceptable failings of leadership” and said it was “extremely unlikely that senior leaders were unaware of what was going on.”

Leadsom, the former business minister who twice ran to be Conservative Party leader, did not call for Johnson to resign but said individual lawmakers would need to decide how best to restore confidence in the government.

At least 54 Conservative members of parliament are required to formally request a confidence vote to the chairman of the party’s 1922 Committee for one to be triggered. The letters are confidential, so only the chairman of the committee knows how many have actually been submitted.

Science Minister George Freeman, asked on Sky News whether the prime minister would win a vote of no confidence next week, said: “I just don’t know.”

“I don’t know where backbench colleagues are,” he said.