What will change in Canada with the accession of King Charles?

Wise

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CBC News on Youtube shows that the death of Queen Elizabeth changed the line of succession with Charles now the monarch and Prince William the heir apparent. Professor of history, Barbara Messamore explains more.
 

Wise

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Mar 3, 2019
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Those currency changes will take some time. Canada is not ready to quickly immediately change faces on coins / papers.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/king-charles-canadian-money-1.6578839

The organizations responsible for the production of our money, the Bank of Canada and the Royal Canadian Mint, are staying mum on the future of Canadian currency as people mourn the death of our head of state. So, too, is the Department of Finance, which makes the final decision on any design updates.
 

Wise

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Here are some real wrongdoings that happened:

Man Arrested After Heckling Prince Andrew During Queen Elizabeth’s Funeral Procession

At least four people have been arrested while protesting or disrupting events for the late queen’s funeral and the new king’s accession, police say.


Sexual assault reported in the queue to view Queen Elizabeth II's coffin

A man has been charged after allegedly sexually assaulting two women in the queue for Queen Elizabeth II's lying in state in London on Wednesday, the Crown Prosecution Service told CNN.

A man has been charged after allegedly sexually assaulting two women in the queue for Queen Elizabeth II's lying in state in London on Wednesday, the Crown Prosecution Service told CNN.

A spokesperson for the Crown Prosecution Service said on Friday that the man was charged with two counts of breaching a sexual harm prevention order and two counts of sexual assault on a female.

Police arrested him after he allegedly exposed himself and pushed into the two women from behind, according to PA. The Metropolitan Police said the women had been queuing to see the Queen's coffin after Westminster Hall opened its doors Wednesday.
 
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Wise

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Queen Elizabeth's funeral on Monday will follow an elaborate and precisely detailed plan — one the monarch will have signed off on herself.

More than 2,000 people are expected inside Westminster Abbey in central London for the hour-long service, which will begin precisely — as royal events do — at 11 a.m. local time (6 a.m. ET) and be broadcast to an audience around the world.

At its heart is the traditional Church of England funeral service, along with elements of military pomp and circumstance that find their roots in how Queen Victoria wished to have her funeral unfold more than a century ago.
 

Wise

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Mar 3, 2019
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Interesting.

Why does the Queen face right on coins but left on postage stamps?

  • THE design of coins is determined by a tradition going back at least to the time of Charles II that the direction in which the head faces should alternate between the coinage of successive monarchs. The only exception to this has been the coinage of Edward VIII, who insisted on his likeness facing left. It is not clear whether this was an expression of rebellion against convention, or vanity, to show what he regarded as his better profile, containing his hair parting. Edward VIII abdicated before being crowned, and no new coinage was released into general circulation during his reign, although a few experimental pieces were produced. Some coins were issued in British colonies, but none with a likeness of the King, though an appropriate design (facing left) had been chosen. It was nevertheless determined that designs for the coinage of George VI, his successor, should be prepared as if that of Edward VIII had been produced and as if it had depicted him facing right, thus reinstating the original tradition. The coinage of Elizabeth II has been in accordance with tradition. Postage stamps are quite different. Ever since the first prepaid adhesive stamps were issued in 1840, all standard issues have shown the head of the reigning monarch in profile (except between 1953 and 1967, with a three-quarters view of Elizabeth II) and facing left. The direction appears to have been determined solely by the fact that the earliest were based upon a medal showing Victoria facing left: it is possible that the direction was selected to conform with the coinage then in circulation. The rule does not apply to commemorative issues: three such stamps were produced showing George VI and Queen Elizabeth; the couple are shown in full-face or in profile facing right. An early commemorative stamp of Elizabeth II also shows her full-face: commemorative issues since 1966 have usually shown a profile view based on the bust designed by Mary Gillick for the pre-decimal coinage. Regular issues have shown a crowned bust based upon a plaster cast by Arnold Machin, who also designed the decimal coinage. Since 1973, many have shown a profile silhouette of the Queen facing right. Certain postage stamps issued to commemorate royal weddings have not contained the Queen's head at all.
 

harrylee

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Mar 22, 2019
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This solves the ear problem.

That is a really bizzare fact I did not know before.
Ahhh, but now the nose comes into play.

 
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DaSleeper

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May 27, 2007
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Interesting.

Why does the Queen face right on coins but left on postage stamps?

  • THE design of coins is determined by a tradition going back at least to the time of Charles II that the direction in which the head faces should alternate between the coinage of successive monarchs. The only exception to this has been the coinage of Edward VIII, who insisted on his likeness facing left. It is not clear whether this was an expression of rebellion against convention, or vanity, to show what he regarded as his better profile, containing his hair parting. Edward VIII abdicated before being crowned, and no new coinage was released into general circulation during his reign, although a few experimental pieces were produced. Some coins were issued in British colonies, but none with a likeness of the King, though an appropriate design (facing left) had been chosen. It was nevertheless determined that designs for the coinage of George VI, his successor, should be prepared as if that of Edward VIII had been produced and as if it had depicted him facing right, thus reinstating the original tradition. The coinage of Elizabeth II has been in accordance with tradition. Postage stamps are quite different. Ever since the first prepaid adhesive stamps were issued in 1840, all standard issues have shown the head of the reigning monarch in profile (except between 1953 and 1967, with a three-quarters view of Elizabeth II) and facing left. The direction appears to have been determined solely by the fact that the earliest were based upon a medal showing Victoria facing left: it is possible that the direction was selected to conform with the coinage then in circulation. The rule does not apply to commemorative issues: three such stamps were produced showing George VI and Queen Elizabeth; the couple are shown in full-face or in profile facing right. An early commemorative stamp of Elizabeth II also shows her full-face: commemorative issues since 1966 have usually shown a profile view based on the bust designed by Mary Gillick for the pre-decimal coinage. Regular issues have shown a crowned bust based upon a plaster cast by Arnold Machin, who also designed the decimal coinage. Since 1973, many have shown a profile silhouette of the Queen facing right. Certain postage stamps issued to commemorate royal weddings have not contained the Queen's head at all.
This goes under the heading of totally useless information:D
 
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Taxslave2

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With luck this will bring an end to Canada having an unelected foreigner for head of state.