Well, today is the Liberal/NDP Non-Coalition Coalition Budget Day!

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
24,346
8,708
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
It's in Singh's best interest you pull the plug. Numbers have him as opposition leader if we hit the polls. Today could be the non-confidence vote we've been waiting for.
🤞
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
24,346
8,708
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
Taxpayers should brace for impact based on the finance minister’s latest projections.

Interest charges on the federal debt will go from $47 billion this year to $61 billion in 2028-29, according to the budget update.

But what does $61 billion mean to you?

Sixty-one billion is the same amount the government plans to collect with the GST in 2028-29.

So, in a few short years, when you pay the GST on a hockey stick, a tank of gas or a bar of soap, every penny will go to interest charges on the federal debt.

In fact, interest charges will surpass federal health-care transfers next year.

Let the shock sink in just a little deeper. What could we do if it weren’t for the federal debt?

We could virtually double federal health spending.

Or we could completely eliminate the GST in a couple of years.

Somehow the government is communicating these perplexing projections with considerable calmness.

Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland claims “the foundation of our Fall Economic Statement is our responsible fiscal plan.”

But last year the government spent $474 billion. And this year the feds plan on spending $489 billion. By 2029, the government will be spending $595 billion a year.

Pro-tip for Freeland: when you spend billions of dollars more every year, you’re saving money wrong.
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
24,346
8,708
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
1702223903645.jpeg
(For some reason, when I see these side-by Hallway Synchronized Waddle Photoshoots, I mentally hear the below theme song playing)
1702223935010.jpegThe update adds $20.8 billion in new spending since the spring budget over five years, with some new measures designed to boost the housing supply, including rental units and affordable housing.

But much of the new spending is tied to policies and programs the federal government announced before Tuesday's fall economic statement, including billions of dollars for electric-vehicle battery plants.😉
1702224134979.jpeg
1702224387501.jpeg
1702224413151.jpeg
 
  • Sad
Reactions: Taxslave2

Taxslave2

House Member
Aug 13, 2022
3,199
1,924
113
  • Like
Reactions: Dixie Cup

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
24,346
8,708
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
All the result of poor economic policies by a party that doesn't care abut our money. I see, though, that politicians have received raises sufficient to more than cover the cost of living increases while no private sector employee has even come close, and pensioners are expected to live for a year on turdOWE's monthly food budget.
1702242315401.jpeg
 
  • Like
Reactions: petros

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
24,346
8,708
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
Pollara Strategic Insights’ class identity survey, involving 3,000 adult Canadians, showed that optimism has reached its lowest point in nine years. Less than 31 per cent of respondents said they are optimistic about the future of Canada’s middle class, marking a significant drop from 53 per cent in 2020.

About 43 per cent of self-identified middle-class respondents reported that they are merely managing to get by without any savings, and an additional 15 per cent are struggling to keep up with monthly expenses.
1703583622753.jpeg
The Salvation Army’s recently released annual report is even more troubling. It found that one in four Canadians are extremely concerned about having sufficient income to cover basic needs.

Those concerns were particularly acute among single parents, with nearly 40 per cent expressing extreme worry about meeting essential needs. One in five Canadians reported reducing meal sizes or skipping meals altogether due to financial constraints.
1703583678761.jpeg
The report also highlights the surge in food bank use. About 22 per cent of respondents said they visit food banks weekly, with nearly half of those being first-time users in 2023.
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
24,346
8,708
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland says the federal government is putting nearly $200 million in “new” (?) money toward supporting low-income renters and shelters….from…?

Ottawa is “pouring” (?) an additional $99 million into the Canada Housing Benefit, which offers financial support for low-income renters in partnership with provinces and territories.

Freeland says another $100 million will go toward emergency winter funding to help shelters to create more spaces for people without housing.
The measures come as the government faces increasing pressure to address skyrocketing rent prices and help communities struggling with homelessness.

Ministers with portfolios that touch on the economy have been holding almost-weekly news conferences since the fall as part of the Liberal government's effort to “sell” (?) policies that address cost-of-living issues.

(Data from Rentals.ca and market research firm Urbanation showed the average asking rent for December in Canada jumped 8.6 per cent year-over-year to a record high of $2,178 per month)
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
24,346
8,708
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
  • Like
Reactions: petros

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
110,746
11,983
113
Low Earth Orbit
  • Like
Reactions: Dixie Cup