WE really need to get rid of this guy

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
23,827
8,394
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Regina, Saskatchewan
Liberal Budget, etc…

In 2015, Justin Trudeau “looked straight at Canadians” (his phrase) and in that soft, hushed, mellow tone he struggles to adopt when he’s about to burst from the magma force of his urgent sincerity, promised — “being honest the way I always have” — that by 2019 (four years back for those who are counting), Canada would have a “balanced budget.”

Balanced. By 2019. Zero deficit. That’s before COVID, etc…
 
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Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
23,827
8,394
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
It has been just over one year since the Liberal-NDP coalition formed a confidence-and-supply agreement. CBC News says this agreement could be “a model for the future.”

But it’s clear this non-coalition coalition has not been good for Canadians who don’t buy into a woke political agenda, including the “anti-woke left.”

Many of these voters on the anti-woke left live in the Greater Toronto Area. They are people who have voted for the Liberal party or NDP in the past, but don’t share the politicof Justin Trudeau or Jagmeet Singh today.

The anti-woke left is made up of small-L liberals who hold Jean Chretien’s views on fiscal responsibility and free speech and reject Trudeau’s reckless spending and internet censorship.

The anti-woke left also includes blue-collar workers who believe in the NDP’s past commitment to respecting unions but reject the NDP’s current commitment to accusing hard-working Canadians of being complicit in “systemic racism.”

CBC News celebrated the Liberal-NDP confidence-and-supply agreement on Sunday by arguing the Conservative Party of Canada will struggle to form a majority government as long as the Liberal-NDP coalition is in effect. But, with so many fair-minded Canadians being rejected by the Liberal-NDP non-coalition coalition, I’d argue the CBC is wrong (Surprise!).
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
23,827
8,394
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
If you were to try and be objective, and sit down and try and write up 10 major achievements of Justin Trudeau in the past decade, you would not get to 10. You wouldn’t. There simply haven’t been that many.

You might suggest that he did well during the COVID pandemic, until you remember that he got us vaccines much later than any of our allies. You might also suggest that he repaired frayed relationships with the provinces — until you remember that the Liberal brand has been effectively wiped out provincially, from coast to coast to coast.

You might even want to suggest that Quebec separatism has remained dormant during Trudeau’s tenure — until you recall that Western alienation is at an all-time high, and Quebec has been placated only because Trudeau has given it everything a separatist could possibly desire.

So, a top 10 list of achievements isn’t really possible. But a list of his top 10 failures over the past decade? That’s a lot easier to put together.

There’s been the scandals, from the Aga Khan to SNC-Lavalin to the WE “charity” to, now, allegedly covering up Chinese election interference and the venal Trudeau Foundation. There’s been $6,000-a-night hotel rooms. There’s been revelations about black face and groping women and surfing on a day set aside for reconciliation with Indigenous people.
1681658752614.jpeg

Here’s where it’s interesting. This is written by “Warren Kinsella” who was encouraged to run for the Liberals Federally….

Before all of the bad things happened, at the start of his tenure, legendary Liberal MP Dennis Mills and some others — a couple premiers, some senators, some Liberal luminaries — approached me to urge me to run under Trudeau’s Liberal banner in a Toronto-area riding.

I thought about it. I met with the local riding association, who seemed like nice people. But then I went to an event downtown, where Chrystia Freeland and Bill Morneau were on stage, were prostrating themselves to Gerald Butts and Katie Telford. They sounded like supplicants, not future cabinet ministers.

It revolted me. And I knew what it meant. Unlike Jean Chretien and unlike Dalton McGuinty, both of whom I had been proud to support, Trudeau’s Liberal Party would concentrate power in the hands of a few unelected children in PMO, and pay no heed to the voices of Members of Parliament — nor to the people who those Members of Parliament represent.

And that’s exactly what has happened. Liberal Party of Canada isn’t a political party anymore. It is, as Trudeau and Telford and Butts freely admit, a “movement.”

Political parties are bottom-up. Movements, like the cults that they so closely resemble, are top-down.

Inevitably, cults die off when the faults of the cult leader are exposed for all to see. And that is what has happened to Justin Trudeau’s movement: It has failed, and it is failing, because of him.

Ten years in, Justin Trudeau may still be leader of the Liberal Party of Canada. Yes.

But after 10 years, he is also this: One of the worst prime ministers this country has ever had.
I have worked for a prime minister, and I can tell you that a good way of determining a prime minister’s unpopularity is to count the number of RCMP officers in his or her security detail. And Justin Trudeau’s security detail is enormous, a virtual army. There’s a reason for that.

Ten years: That’s how long Justin Trudeau has been leader of the Liberal Party of Canada. It’s not as long as his father was leader (16), or Jean Chretien (13). But a decade as leader of the most successful political machine in Western democracy, and Prime Minister of Canada for most of it: That’s not bad.

But Trudeau isn’t satisfied. He wants a majority, but he can’t get one. He doesn’t need a poll to tell him that he is no longer as popular as he once was, gracing the front page of Rolling Stone magazine, and being feted like a rock star around the world.

He need only show up in public somewhere — anywhere — and he will get a taste of the distain in which he is held.
1681658859127.jpeg
 

pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
26,790
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B.C.
If you were to try and be objective, and sit down and try and write up 10 major achievements of Justin Trudeau in the past decade, you would not get to 10. You wouldn’t. There simply haven’t been that many.

You might suggest that he did well during the COVID pandemic, until you remember that he got us vaccines much later than any of our allies. You might also suggest that he repaired frayed relationships with the provinces — until you remember that the Liberal brand has been effectively wiped out provincially, from coast to coast to coast.

You might even want to suggest that Quebec separatism has remained dormant during Trudeau’s tenure — until you recall that Western alienation is at an all-time high, and Quebec has been placated only because Trudeau has given it everything a separatist could possibly desire.

So, a top 10 list of achievements isn’t really possible. But a list of his top 10 failures over the past decade? That’s a lot easier to put together.

There’s been the scandals, from the Aga Khan to SNC-Lavalin to the WE “charity” to, now, allegedly covering up Chinese election interference and the venal Trudeau Foundation. There’s been $6,000-a-night hotel rooms. There’s been revelations about black face and groping women and surfing on a day set aside for reconciliation with Indigenous people.
View attachment 17903

Here’s where it’s interesting. This is written by “Warren Kinsella” who was encouraged to run for the Liberals Federally….

Before all of the bad things happened, at the start of his tenure, legendary Liberal MP Dennis Mills and some others — a couple premiers, some senators, some Liberal luminaries — approached me to urge me to run under Trudeau’s Liberal banner in a Toronto-area riding.

I thought about it. I met with the local riding association, who seemed like nice people. But then I went to an event downtown, where Chrystia Freeland and Bill Morneau were on stage, were prostrating themselves to Gerald Butts and Katie Telford. They sounded like supplicants, not future cabinet ministers.

It revolted me. And I knew what it meant. Unlike Jean Chretien and unlike Dalton McGuinty, both of whom I had been proud to support, Trudeau’s Liberal Party would concentrate power in the hands of a few unelected children in PMO, and pay no heed to the voices of Members of Parliament — nor to the people who those Members of Parliament represent.

And that’s exactly what has happened. Liberal Party of Canada isn’t a political party anymore. It is, as Trudeau and Telford and Butts freely admit, a “movement.”

Political parties are bottom-up. Movements, like the cults that they so closely resemble, are top-down.

Inevitably, cults die off when the faults of the cult leader are exposed for all to see. And that is what has happened to Justin Trudeau’s movement: It has failed, and it is failing, because of him.

Ten years in, Justin Trudeau may still be leader of the Liberal Party of Canada. Yes.

But after 10 years, he is also this: One of the worst prime ministers this country has ever had.
I have worked for a prime minister, and I can tell you that a good way of determining a prime minister’s unpopularity is to count the number of RCMP officers in his or her security detail. And Justin Trudeau’s security detail is enormous, a virtual army. There’s a reason for that.

Ten years: That’s how long Justin Trudeau has been leader of the Liberal Party of Canada. It’s not as long as his father was leader (16), or Jean Chretien (13). But a decade as leader of the most successful political machine in Western democracy, and Prime Minister of Canada for most of it: That’s not bad.

But Trudeau isn’t satisfied. He wants a majority, but he can’t get one. He doesn’t need a poll to tell him that he is no longer as popular as he once was, gracing the front page of Rolling Stone magazine, and being feted like a rock star around the world.

He need only show up in public somewhere — anywhere — and he will get a taste of the distain in which he is held.
View attachment 17904
The movement , I think there might be a hidden meaning .
 
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Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
23,827
8,394
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
As Andrew Coyne memorably said: They‘re just trolling us, now.

The Trudeau Liberals, that is. “Trolling,” generally, is Internet slang for a person who intentionally tries to instigate conflict, hostility, or arguments with someone else. In this case, specifically, it’s Justin Trudeau signalling — once and for all, beyond any reasonable doubt — that he doesn’t give a rat’s ass what you, his employers, think.
1681910380257.jpeg
That’s the bad news.

The good news — and Lord knows we could use some, as you will shortly see — is that the CBC still knows how to publish stories that are highly, highly damaging to Justin Trudeau.

Just a day after Elon Musk’s Twitter labelled the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation “government-funded media,” thereby implying that the CBC is effectively on Trudeau’s political payroll, the Mother Corp. struck back.

First thing Tuesday morning, CBC’s French-language news team broke a pretty big story:

Trudeau and his family spent the Christmas holidays at something called Prospect, an uber-rich seaside estate owned by the Green family in Jamaica.

Who, CBC reported, had previously made a huge donation to the Trudeau Foundation.

Which, as we all know, is now at the very epicentre of the metastasizing Chinese election and influence-peddling scandal.

Well done, CBC. Take note, Elon Musk.

The trip cost taxpayers — you and me — some $160,000 because of security and personnel costs. Trudeau’s staff, CBC noted, had been billeted at a nearby resort. All-inclusive, natch.
1681910480792.jpeg

Trudeau’s fart-catchers will claim, and have, that the trip was cleared by the Ethics Commissioner. Said office now being led by the sister-in-law of one of Trudeau’s cabinet ministers, who also happens to be one of his best friends.

But nobody outside of Ottawa cares what the “Ethics Commissioner” says, anymore. From Whitehorse to Windsor, regular Canadians don’t need an “Ethics Commissioner” to tell them what is wright and what is wrong.

Morally wrong, ethically wrong. Regular folks know Trudeau’s latest vacation on the public dime is wrong — and profoundly, deeply disgusting — for two big reasons.

One, it’s Trudeau — a multi-millionaire, remember — spending other people’s money recklessly. At a time when the vast majority of them can’t afford a trip to the grocery store, let alone an exclusive retreat in Jamaica.
1681910128449.jpeg
Two, it’s wrong because it shows the Liberal prime minister’s utter disregard for the seriousness of the Chinese election and influence-peddling scandal. When the foundation that bears his family name has been used as a vehicle by Chinese agents to influence Trudeau, is it wise to spend the holidays at the Caribbean mansion of a known Trudeau Foundation donor?

No, it isn’t. And that much is obvious to everyone else — the leaders of the Conservative, New Democratic and Bloc Quebecois parties, included. They, like the rest of us, were shocked and appalled by what CBC reported. Even unnamed Liberals were disgusted. “We wonder why he goes to places like that,” a source told Radio-Canada.

Said another: “I can’t explain why he provides (the Opposition) with ammunition and feeds these kinds of attacks.”

I can tell you why. And it’s the bad news, mentioned right off the top.

It’s this: Justin Trudeau just doesn’t care. He doesn’t care what any of us think, anymore. He doesn’t give a sweet damn. And he’s going to keep doing things like this until he can’t anymore.

Which is up to us. Because, at the earliest opportunity, we need to vote the jerk out. Enough is enough.
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
23,827
8,394
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
OTTAWA – Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said he has probably visited a longtime family friend’s luxurious estate in Jamaica “dozens and dozens of times” in past decades, but his most recent trip during the winter holiday period was the only time he went there as prime minister.
1681953720406.jpeg
“Throughout the decades, I continued to be friends with these people and to visit them,” he said. “Sometimes I would go to theirs, sometimes they would come to mine. We are real friends … and I think even Conservatives would understand the concept of real friends.”

Poilievre chuckled that his own friends might buy him a cup of coffee or a beer, but certainly not a gifted vacation worth tens of thousands of dollars.
(For clarification, Neither person in the above video is Justin Trudeau in Blackface)

In politics, there’s a fine line between friendship and cronyism. If Trudeau can’t see the difference, his ethical judgment is seriously lacking.

His vacation to an island in the Bahamas owned by the Aga Khan was found by the ethics commissioner to have breached the Conflict of Interest Act. Trudeau said it was fine because, well, the Aga Khan is an old family friend. There was his friendship with Craig and Marc Kielburger, founders of the WE organization that got a controversial $900 million sole-sourced student grant contract in 2020. That deal prompted calls in Parliament for tougher conflict of interest rules.

Trudeau appointed another family friend, David Johnston, who has ties to the Pierre Trudeau Foundation, as a “special rapporteur” to decide whether an inquiry is needed into foreign interference in Canadian elections. No question that Johnston is a person of great integrity, but Trudeau should have appointed someone who’s at arm’s length from him and his family.

Time and again, Trudeau’s old boys’ network gets him into trouble. Oh well…

It’s not so much the cost of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s Christmas vacation to Jamaica that’s shocking. He’s entitled to a holiday. Taxpayers rightly foot the $160,000 bill for his security and a private jet — as they would for any PM. He says the ethics commissioner gave the vacation the green light. So, why should we care?

The optics of this prime minister repeatedly cozying up to rich people in order to secure swanky vacations at a time when ordinary Canadians are hurting is problematic.
1681959452459.jpeg
He doesn’t seem to understand there might be a conflict for him to have his holidays subsidized by people of influence.

Trudeau was grilled about this by Conservative Leader Pierre Poilievre in question period on Tuesday.

“This prime minister wants us to believe that these Trudeau Foundation donors offered him this $9,000-a-night vacation for nothing,” Poilievre said. “This is about influence and power for the super-rich.”

Trudeau’s response was smug.

“The leader of the Opposition struggles with the concept of friendship,” he said. His family stayed at the luxurious resort owned by Peter Green. Trudeau’s father was godfather to one of the Green children and Green was godfather to one of Trudeau’s brothers. Green also made a large donation to the Trudeau Foundation two years ago.
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
23,827
8,394
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
It’s true, as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau told students at the University of Ottawa last week, that he didn’t force anyone to get vaccinated because of COVID-19.

As Trudeau said: “And therefore, while not forcing anyone to get vaccinated, I chose to make sure that all the incentives and all of the protections were there to encourage Canadians to get vaccinated. And that’s exactly what they did.”

But that’s true only in the sense of the narrowest interpretation of what the use of force means.

That is, that Trudeau didn’t order anyone to be strapped down against their will and injected with a vaccine.

But as Conservative leader Pierre Poilievre pointed out, the prime minister was being disingenuous in describing his approach as mere “incentives” to “encourage Canadians to get vaccinated.”

What Trudeau actually said, on Oct. 6, 2001, in a video, “Announcing mandatory vaccination for the federal workforce and transportation sectors” was:

“The bottom line? Proof of vaccination will be required by no later than the end of this month for all federal employees. And by mid-November, enforcement measures in place will make sure that everyone is vaccinated.”
1682866159278.jpeg
So, no, he didn’t force anyone to take a vaccine, but he made it difficult for those in the federal workforce and in the federal transportation sector to avoid taking it.

Trudeau also weaponized the vaccination issue for political purposes and we know exactly when that happened.

It was during the last federal election campaign.

In the space of four days from Aug. 27 to 31 in 2021, Trudeau changed his message about people who were disputing his campaign because of anger about his COVID and vaccination policies from meeting their “anger with compassion” to “those people are putting us all at risk.”

So, what happened in those four days to cause this dramatic change in Trudeau’s election rhetoric?
As Global TV’s David Akin reported at the time, “Trudeau’s different approach to the anti-vaxxers … follows the release of several polls which show his party is now in second place behind the (Erin) O’Toole Conservatives and in danger of losing government.”

Trudeau can certainly argue his policies with regard to vaccinations and COVID were legal and necessary. But they were far from purely voluntary.
1682866627845.png
 

Dixie Cup

Senate Member
Sep 16, 2006
5,789
3,637
113
Edmonton
It’s true, as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau told students at the University of Ottawa last week, that he didn’t force anyone to get vaccinated because of COVID-19.

As Trudeau said: “And therefore, while not forcing anyone to get vaccinated, I chose to make sure that all the incentives and all of the protections were there to encourage Canadians to get vaccinated. And that’s exactly what they did.”

But that’s true only in the sense of the narrowest interpretation of what the use of force means.

That is, that Trudeau didn’t order anyone to be strapped down against their will and injected with a vaccine.

But as Conservative leader Pierre Poilievre pointed out, the prime minister was being disingenuous in describing his approach as mere “incentives” to “encourage Canadians to get vaccinated.”

What Trudeau actually said, on Oct. 6, 2001, in a video, “Announcing mandatory vaccination for the federal workforce and transportation sectors” was:

“The bottom line? Proof of vaccination will be required by no later than the end of this month for all federal employees. And by mid-November, enforcement measures in place will make sure that everyone is vaccinated.”
View attachment 18013
So, no, he didn’t force anyone to take a vaccine, but he made it difficult for those in the federal workforce and in the federal transportation sector to avoid taking it.

Trudeau also weaponized the vaccination issue for political purposes and we know exactly when that happened.

It was during the last federal election campaign.

In the space of four days from Aug. 27 to 31 in 2021, Trudeau changed his message about people who were disputing his campaign because of anger about his COVID and vaccination policies from meeting their “anger with compassion” to “those people are putting us all at risk.”

So, what happened in those four days to cause this dramatic change in Trudeau’s election rhetoric?
As Global TV’s David Akin reported at the time, “Trudeau’s different approach to the anti-vaxxers … follows the release of several polls which show his party is now in second place behind the (Erin) O’Toole Conservatives and in danger of losing government.”

Trudeau can certainly argue his policies with regard to vaccinations and COVID were legal and necessary. But they were far from purely voluntary.
View attachment 18014
Ah, he lies every time he opens his mouth so what else is new?
 
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