Two years into the Trudeau 2.0 Minority Term, which day will Justin call the election that only he wants?

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
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“Will Trudeau know when the moment is right for leaving?” was the title of the analysis authored by La Presse’s Bureau Chief on Parliament Hill. In a column published last Tuesday, Joël-Denis Bellavance, a well-informed reporter, speculated that the prime minister might use his vacation time in Costa Rica to reflect on his future. If, as some expect, Justin Trudeau decides not to run for a fourth mandate, his party’s prospects in Quebec could become bleaker.


What happens if Liberal support falls in Quebec? There is a strong enough conservative current in the province for the Conservatives to win a majority of seats here, which would make forming a majority government much easier. However, that depends on who the Conservatives choose as their next leader.

Ms. Freeland’s and Mr. Carney’s French is passable and could easily be improved with a bit of practice. Still, Freeland or Carney will have a hard time against the Bloc’s leader, the clever litigator Yves-François Blanchette, in a televised French debate.

If, for one reason or the other, the Liberals and/or the Conservatives fail in proposing an attractive alternative to Quebecers, many will turn to the Bloc. They will “park” their vote there, until one of the national parties gets its act together.

Justin Trudeau’s departure, when it happens, will impact all the pieces on Canada’s political chessboard, not least in Quebec. Here, national parties will again face the challenge of pulling away hundreds of thousands of Quebecers from the comfortable, isolationist Bloc vote. History shows that this is not an easy feat.
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
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What makes people believe there will be a "next election?" The nonexistent "climate crisis"(laNina which is poised to end this winter) is reason enough for our narcissistic FASD suffering, drug addled, organic liquor pig PM to pull another suspension of the Charter.
 
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pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
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What makes people believe there will be a "next election?" The nonexistent "climate crisis"(laNina which is poised to end this winter) is reason enough for our narcissistic FASD suffering, drug addled, organic liquor pig PM to pull another suspension of the Charter.
That will cause lots of honking , oh the horror .
 
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petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
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Canadian geese are racist. Especially the white snow geese. They should be held at the border with Montana and North Dakota where white birds belong.
 
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DaSleeper

Trolling Hypocrites
May 27, 2007
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What makes people believe there will be a "next election?" The nonexistent "climate crisis"(laNina which is poised to end this winter) is reason enough for our narcissistic FASD suffering, drug addled, organic liquor pig PM to pull another suspension of the Charter.
No Lee Harvey Oswald in Canada..............


Pity!
 

taxme

Time Out
Feb 11, 2020
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Round#4? Honestly, truthfully — election talk is starting up again in Ottawa. As in, a federal election. As in, commencing in the month of November

We know, we know. It makes no sense. Justin Trudeau and Jagmeet Singh did their Axis of Weasels deal in a smoke-free backroom, and agreed no election for another three years, give or take.

Knowing how the dumb downed Canadian electorate thinks there will probably be a good chance that the Marxist dictator of Ottawa will get to keep his old PM job once again. If I have ever learned anything about Canadians and their voting habits is that when it comes to elections they are stupid and insane enough to vote for this buffoon again. The majority of Canadians are truly an exercise in futility. They did it last time and no doubt they will do it again. Retards indeed. (n)
 
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spaminator

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Oct 26, 2009
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New federal electoral districts proposed in Ontario would cut seats in Toronto, north
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Sarah Ritchie
Publishing date:Aug 20, 2022 • 19 hours ago • 1 minute read • 11 Comments

OTTAWA — The commission responsible for redrawing Ontario’s federal electoral map is proposing an overhaul to account for changes in where people live.


Under the proposal, Toronto and northern Ontario would lose one riding each, with new districts created in the eastern and northern Greater Toronto Area, central Ontario, along with the Guelph and Brampton areas.

The Constitution calls for a review of electoral boundaries after each 10-year census, and a new federal law requires that each province keep at least the number of MPs it had in 2019.

That change will mean Quebec returns to having 78 MPs, rather than the current 77 when the boundaries are redrawn.

The soonest the new maps could be in place for a general election is 2024.

Ontario’s boundaries commission is taking into account data from the 2021 census as it tries to address overrepresentation in some areas — such as Toronto — and under-representation in others, including Durham, Dufferin and Caledon.


Population growth in the city of Toronto was lower from 2011 to 2021 than in the rest of Ontario, and there are now disparities in population density and riding size, the commission says.

It has also taken into account the number of Indigenous, francophone, and rural and urban communities to ensure representation in the House of Commons is not diminished.

In the northern part of the province, where growth has been modest over the last decade, the new map would create one “extraordinary circumstances” district in order to preserve a riding in a remote area with a number of Indigenous communities.

The district would be more than 520,000 square kilometres, though the commission noted there are larger ridings elsewhere in the country.

The commission will now hold public hearings and collect feedback on the proposed 122-district map.

Proposed maps have already been produced in every other province, where public feedback has started. The territories, which have one seat each, will not see any changes.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Aug. 19, 2022.
 

spaminator

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Toronto may lose MP due to federal redistricting
Toronto may lose a seat in Parliament, while Ontario overall would gain one MP

Author of the article:postmedia News
Publishing date:Aug 22, 2022 • 12 hours ago • 2 minute read • Join the conversation

Toronto may lose a seat in Parliament with the changes proposed by federal redistricting.


Federal electoral districts are reviewed after each census to reflect change in Canada’s population.

Toronto has grown — but the rest of Ontario has grown even more.

“The Commission noted over-representation in Toronto has emerged due to uneven population growth between Toronto and surrounding areas which is expected to continue to increase in the future,” wrote the Federal Electoral Boundaries Commission for Ontario, according to Blacklock’s Reporter.

“As a result the Commission concluded the districts in Toronto can be reduced by one.”

Toronto’s ridings would fall in number from 25 to 24; the commissioners have proposed eliminating the riding of Scarborough-Agincourt.

It is currently held by Liberal MP Jean Yip, vice-chair of the Commons public accounts committee.


Toronto’s population grew seven percent in the last 10 years, to 2.8 million.

The rest of the province grew 11.7 percent in the same period.

Liberals swept all 25 Toronto ridings in the 2021 federal campaign with 51 percent of the popular vote.

This is the party’s largest plurality in any major Canadian city, although Liberal support is similar in such cities as St. John’s, Charlottetown, Halifax, Ottawa, Moncton and Montreal.

In the last federal election the Liberals won all 25 of the most urban ridings in Canada and 109 of the top 150 most urban ridings.

The Conservatives won only 23 of those urban ridings. New research says this reflects a growing split in party supporters — with the Liberal party support becoming more urban and Conservative more rural.


The Boundaries Commission has also proposed eliminating a riding in northern Ontario, Timmins-James Bay. It is currently held by seven-term New Democrat MP Charlie Angus.

Most of the constituency would be merged with the Kenora district into a very large 520,300 square kilometre constituency renamed Kiiwetinoong-Mushkegowuk.

Kenora is currently held by two-term Conservative MP Eric Melillo.

Ontario overall would gain one federal seat to 122 under redistricting.

“One additional riding has been added to central Ontario, eastern Greater Toronto and northern Greater Toronto,” wrote the Commission.

Blacklock’s reports that proposed redrawing of constituencies in other provinces would see one Quebec MP lose her seat, Bloc Quebecois MP Kristina Michaud (Avignon-La Mitis-Matane-Matapedia).

Other changes would see the Calgary area gain three new ridings.

British Columbia would gain one new seat, Vernon-Lake Country, in the Okanagan.
 

spaminator

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MPs to study Access to Information system, federal 'culture of secrecy'
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Publishing date:Sep 26, 2022 • 20 hours ago • 1 minute read • Join the conversation

OTTAWA — The House of Commons information, ethics and privacy committee plans to look at Canada’s much-maligned access-to-information regime — the latest in a long line of studies of a system intended to make government more transparent.


Conservative MP Pat Kelly, the committee chairman, says the system is plagued by excessive delays and a culture of secrecy that has been “baking in for decades.”


The Access to Information Act allows people who pay $5 to ask for a range of federal documents — from internal emails to policy memos — but it has long been criticized as outdated and poorly implemented.

The law has not been significantly updated since its introduction 39 years ago, and many users complain of lengthy delays, heavily blacked-out documents or blanket denials in response to their applications.

Kelly says the problems have persisted for years, spanning both Conservative and Liberal governments.

The planned committee study comes as the federal government works to finish its own review of the access system that began more than two years ago.
 

spaminator

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Former Ontario finance minister to run for federal Liberals in Toronto-area riding
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Publishing date:Nov 05, 2022 • 1 day ago • 1 minute read • 13 Comments

A former Ontario finance minister will be the federal Liberal candidate in an upcoming byelection in the Toronto area that’s set to be called later this month.


A statement from the party says Charles Sousa, who represented a provincial riding in Mississauga for more than a decade and served as finance minister in the Liberal government of premier Kathleen Wynne, will run federally in the Mississauga-Lakeshore riding.


The byelection, which must be called by Nov. 26, will be the first since Pierre Poilievre became leader of the federal Conservatives and Official Opposition earlier this fall.

It’s being held to replace Liberal Sven Spengemann, who announced last May that he would step down to take a position with the United Nations.

A Liberal has represented Mississauga-Lakeshore since the 1990s, with the exception of the years between 2011 and 2015 when a Conservative held the seat.


Sousa is the last major candidate to be nominated after theConservatives announced their new candidate in Mississauga-Lakeshore would be Ron Chhinzer, a member of the Peel Regional Police Service. The NDP has nominated Julia Kole, whose profile on the party’s website says the lifelong Mississauga resident has worked as a constituency assistant to a member of provincial Parliament.

Another lifelong Mississauga resident, Mary Kidnew, is set to run for the Green Party.

“I’m proud to call Mississauga my home, and I care deeply about our community and the families that I represented for 11 years as their MPP,” Sousa said in a statement. “Now, I’m asking to be their next Member of Parliament to continue working together in support of new jobs and a strong economy, and to ensure there’s room for everyone to succeed, to learn, and to help each other.”
 

spaminator

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Federal byelection in Mississauga-Lakeshore riding set for Dec. 12
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Publishing date:Nov 06, 2022 • 15 hours ago • 1 minute read • 5 Comments

OTTAWA — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has set the date for a federal byelection in the Greater Toronto Area.


Voters in Mississauga-Lakeshore will head to the polls to pick their new member of Parliament on Dec. 12.


The seat became empty earlier this year when former Liberal MP Sven Spengemann announced he was resigning to take a job at the United Nations.

The governing Liberals hope he’s replaced by former Ontario Liberal finance minister Charles Sousa, who had represented a provincial riding in Mississauga for more than a decade.

The party announced Sousa as their candidate on Saturday, the day before Trudeau set the byelection date.

The riding has largely been represented by federal Liberals, save for when the Conservatives held it under former prime minister Stephen Harper’s majority government from 2011 to 2015.

Ron Chhinzer, a Peel Regional Police officer, is running for the Tories in the byelection, which will be the first held since Pierre Poilievre became party leader.

Julia Kole, a former provincial constituency assistant in the area, is the New Democrats’ candidate, while Mary Kidnew, a lifelong Mississauga resident, will represent the federal Greens.
 

spaminator

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Mississauga-Lakeshore byelection voters head to the polls Dec. 12
Author of the article:Antonella Artuso
Publishing date:Nov 27, 2022 • 1 day ago • 2 minute read
NDP candidate Julia Kole
NDP candidate Julia Kole PHOTO BY JULIAKOLE.NDP.CA /Toronto Sun
Everywhere Julia Kole door knocks in the riding of Mississauga-Lakeshore she hears the same message — life has become so expensive.


The NDP candidate, who is running to be the riding’s next MP, is in competition with former Ontario finance minister and Liberal candidate Charles Sousa, Peel Regional Police officer and Conservative Party candidate Ron Chhinzer, and 37 other candidates.


The Dec. 12 byelection could be viewed as a showdown between new Conservative Party Leader Pierre Poilievre and Liberal Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

Kole said she’s running because she knows the NDP and leader Jagmeet Singh can deliver ways of making life more affordable, forcing the minority Liberal government to deliver a dental plan and doubled GST rebate.

The byelection gives residents a chance to “shake things up,” to consider different options and candidate choices, she said.

“It can be an amazing opportunity for the NDP and people who really resonate with the values of the NDP to send a strong message to Ottawa,” Kole said in an interview.

Despite the long-standing reputation of Mississauga as a relatively affluent bedroom suburb, residents are facing all the same affordability issues — rapid increases in housing, food and gas, she said.



Mississauga-Lakeshore, which covers the southern part of Mississauga, between Oakville and Etobicoke, has voted Liberal federally since 1993 except for the period of 2011-15 when it was held by Conservative Stella Ambler.

Sousa, who brings a strong business background and held the riding for the provincial Liberals for 11 years until the 2018 election, said he is running because he believes he can be the community’s strongest voice in Ottawa.

“I have seen firsthand the opportunities and challenges that are facing our community, and I am ready to work with Justin Trudeau and the entire Liberal team to make life more affordable for Canadians, take strong climate action, create new jobs, and build an economy that works for everyone,” Sousa said in a statement. “While the Conservative Party proposes policies that would take us backward, roll back our climate action, and cut services that people in Mississauga-Lakeshore rely on, I will remain focused on the future, moving our community forward and building a place where there is room for everyone to succeed, to learn, and to help each other.”

Chhinzer’s main message, according to his website, is “send Justin Trudeau a message.”


The Conservative candidate brings more than 20 years of policing experience and served as a founding member of the Toronto Police Service’s Integrated Gang Prevention Task Force.

Voters can cast ballots in advanced polls on Dec. 2-5.

Information on the byelection, including the names of all registered candidates, can be found at elections.ca.

aartuso@postmedia.com
1669695449987.png
 

pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
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Mississauga-Lakeshore byelection voters head to the polls Dec. 12
Author of the article:Antonella Artuso
Publishing date:Nov 27, 2022 • 1 day ago • 2 minute read
NDP candidate Julia Kole
NDP candidate Julia Kole PHOTO BY JULIAKOLE.NDP.CA /Toronto Sun
Everywhere Julia Kole door knocks in the riding of Mississauga-Lakeshore she hears the same message — life has become so expensive.


The NDP candidate, who is running to be the riding’s next MP, is in competition with former Ontario finance minister and Liberal candidate Charles Sousa, Peel Regional Police officer and Conservative Party candidate Ron Chhinzer, and 37 other candidates.


The Dec. 12 byelection could be viewed as a showdown between new Conservative Party Leader Pierre Poilievre and Liberal Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

Kole said she’s running because she knows the NDP and leader Jagmeet Singh can deliver ways of making life more affordable, forcing the minority Liberal government to deliver a dental plan and doubled GST rebate.

The byelection gives residents a chance to “shake things up,” to consider different options and candidate choices, she said.

“It can be an amazing opportunity for the NDP and people who really resonate with the values of the NDP to send a strong message to Ottawa,” Kole said in an interview.

Despite the long-standing reputation of Mississauga as a relatively affluent bedroom suburb, residents are facing all the same affordability issues — rapid increases in housing, food and gas, she said.



Mississauga-Lakeshore, which covers the southern part of Mississauga, between Oakville and Etobicoke, has voted Liberal federally since 1993 except for the period of 2011-15 when it was held by Conservative Stella Ambler.

Sousa, who brings a strong business background and held the riding for the provincial Liberals for 11 years until the 2018 election, said he is running because he believes he can be the community’s strongest voice in Ottawa.

“I have seen firsthand the opportunities and challenges that are facing our community, and I am ready to work with Justin Trudeau and the entire Liberal team to make life more affordable for Canadians, take strong climate action, create new jobs, and build an economy that works for everyone,” Sousa said in a statement. “While the Conservative Party proposes policies that would take us backward, roll back our climate action, and cut services that people in Mississauga-Lakeshore rely on, I will remain focused on the future, moving our community forward and building a place where there is room for everyone to succeed, to learn, and to help each other.”

Chhinzer’s main message, according to his website, is “send Justin Trudeau a message.”


The Conservative candidate brings more than 20 years of policing experience and served as a founding member of the Toronto Police Service’s Integrated Gang Prevention Task Force.

Voters can cast ballots in advanced polls on Dec. 2-5.

Information on the byelection, including the names of all registered candidates, can be found at elections.ca.

aartuso@postmedia.com
View attachment 16592
Good another backbench lickspittle , just what Canada needs .
 
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spaminator

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Trudeau's Liberals tell MPs to be election ready, raise cash by spring
Author of the article:Brian Lilley
Publishing date:Nov 28, 2022 • 21 hours ago • 2 minute read

Will Canadians be headed to the polls for a federal election next spring?


That remains to be seen, but we do know the Trudeau Liberals have told their troops to be ready.


The governing party has informed its current MPs that if they want to hold the nomination heading into the next election, they need to get busy with fundraising and campaigning now.

According to a posting on the Liberal’s own website, MPs are expected to have held “at least 3 Voter Contact Days of Action” and to have attempted “at least 3,500 door knocks or 7,500 phone calls” alongside party volunteers. That’s the community outreach requirements, then there are the financial requirements for current MPs to be allowed to retain their Liberal nomination unchallenged.

The party is asking that MPs ensure their riding associations have “at least 65% of the anticipated election expense limit” and sign up at least 40 additional monthly donors to the party’s “Victory Fund.”


It’s more money than the Liberals have demanded in the past, and a sure sign that the central party bosses want to be ready. It’s also smart politics, if we’re being completely honest.

In minority parliaments, parties must always be ready for a snap election. This includes a situation where there are agreements in place, such as the one between the Trudeau Liberals and Jagmeet Singh’s NDP.

While that agreement is supposed to keep the current government in place until 2025, that’s not a sure thing. The NDP could easily pull their support over a disagreement, or the Liberals could see an opportunity and take it.

As anyone who has been involved in minority parliaments will tell you, someone always needs to be planning for a possible election.


It’s no different for the Conservative side in terms of looking to be prepared. Leader Pierre Poilievre continues to look to staff up his office and rebuild the party apparatus after making a clean break from the former O’Toole team.

As that process continues, Poilievre has been able to fill some key roles with people who have experience winning elections. Mike Crase, the new executive director of the Conservative Party of Canada, joined Poilievre’s team after running Ontario’s Progressive Conservative Party since 2018 and assisting on two successive election victories.

In addition to Crase, a number of staffers with experience at Queen’s Park have joined Poilievre’s efforts. It’s this sort of experience that will help Poilievre’s team whenever the next election comes.


Money is what makes the political world move, and on that front the Conservatives continue to dominate. In 2021, the Conservatives raised $26 million compared to $18 million for the Liberals and so far this year, the Conservatives have outperformed the governing party in every quarter.

Neither of the two main parties are pushing for an early election in the new year, but both are getting ready. Plans are being put in place and preparations are underway to ensure that a surprise campaign can be fought.

At this point, a spring election is unlikely, but March is a long time away and as the saying goes, a week can be an eternity in politics. There is a real possibility that Canada, along with many other countries, could be entering a recession in 2023 which will change the dynamics once more.

Bottom line, stay tuned, things could change at any minute.
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
18,538
4,265
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
Well, somebody is confident in the results of the Emergencies Act Inquiry due in written report to Parliament Feb 25th, 2023…..& Jagmeet might not be getting that pension after all.

Maybe this is just to ensure Mr.Singh tows the line going forward if he knows he’s disposable….?