Refugee/Migrant Crisis

petros

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Nov 21, 2008
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Low Earth Orbit
Mexico Begins Constructing Wall To Keep Illegal Immigrants From Coming Back

Mar 20, 2024

PIEDRAS NEGRAS — As the debate in the United States continued to rage over the ongoing migrant crisis along the southern border, Mexico announced plans to begin construction on a wall to keep illegal immigrants from coming back.

The idea to build a wall along its northern border, which Mexican leaders said they came up with all by themselves, will prevent unvetted and unidentified migrants from entering the country, thereby making Mexico a safer, more secure nation.

"It's going to be a big, beautiful wall," said Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador. "We're going to build a wall and we're going to make the United States pay for it. If the U.S. thinks they can just send endless waves of Mexican gang members, criminals, rapists, and murderers into Mexico, they've got another thing coming. A nation without borders is not a nation. We've got to build a wall and make Mexico great again!"

Though U.S. officials had asked Mexico to take back deported migrants in hopes of easing the burden of border towns and other cities that have become overrun after months of overwhelming immigrant surges, Obrador took a hardline stance. "We don't know who they're sending here," he said. "We can't afford to let huge mobs of Mexicans flow into Mexico unchecked. It's too dangerous. Build the wall!"

At publishing time, construction on the border wall had already commenced, with President Obrador being hailed as a genius and praised for his dedication to protecting Mexico from foreign invasion.
 

spaminator

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Oct 26, 2009
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Four Canadian men held in Syria ask Supreme Court to revisit request for hearing
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Published Mar 26, 2024 • 1 minute read

Four Canadian men detained in Syria are asking the Supreme Court of Canada to reconsider their pleas for a hearing that could open the door to their freedom.
Four Canadian men detained in Syria are asking the Supreme Court of Canada to reconsider their pleas for a hearing that could open the door to their freedom.
OTTAWA — Four Canadian men detained in Syria are asking the Supreme Court of Canada to reconsider their pleas for a hearing that could open the door to their freedom.


In November, the Supreme Court declined to hear the men’s challenge of a Federal Court of Appeal ruling that said Ottawa is not obligated under the law to repatriate them.


In a notice filed with the top court, lawyers for the men say exceedingly rare circumstances warrant another look at the application for leave to appeal.

Following its usual custom, the court gave no reasons for refusing to examine the matter.

The detained Canadians are among the many foreign nationals in ramshackle detention centres run by Kurdish forces that wrested the war-ravaged region from militant group Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant.

In the newly filed notice, lawyers for the men say there is a “constitutional imperative” for the top court to agree to hear a case when the evidence reveals issues of public importance grounded in serious breaches of basic human rights.
 
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spaminator

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Statistics Canada says population growth rate in 2023 was highest since 1957
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Published Mar 27, 2024 • Last updated 1 day ago • 3 minute read

MONTREAL — Canada’s population grew faster last year than it has at any time since the 1950s, amid a surge in the number of temporary residents, Statistics Canada reported Wednesday.


The statistics agency says the population grew by 3.2 per cent in 2023, reaching 40,769,890 as of Jan. 1, 2024, the highest rate since 1957, when it grew 3.3 per cent.


“About 98 per cent of population growth was explained by international migration and, in fact, it’s mostly the temporary immigration component that’s driving population growth in Canada,” said Patrick Charbonneau, chief of Statistics Canada’s Centre for Demography.

Across Canada, the population rose by 1,271,872 between Jan. 1, 2023 and Jan. 1, 2024, with 471,771 immigrants settling in the country last year and the number of temporary residents rising by 804,901.

Most of those temporary residents are coming to Canada to work, Charbonneau said in an interview Wednesday, but a significant percentage are international students. Around one in 10 are asylum seekers.


Growth rates above three per cent have “never been see in a developed country” since the 1950s, said Frederic Payeur, a demographer at Quebec’s provincial statistics agency, the Institut de la statistique du Quebec.

Canada’s migration-driven increase is comparable to Israel’s in the 1960s and Ireland’s in 2006 and 2007 — when the country experienced an immigration boom during a period of rapid economic growth, he said. But even then, neither of those countries had population increases above three per cent.

In Quebec, where the population grew by 2.5 per cent, “in absolute numbers, this is the most growth ever seen,” he said. “As a proportion of the population, in 1957, there was a bit more overall growth, but that was mainly due to the baby boom, combined with a wave of migration linked to events in Hungary.” More than 37,000 Hungarian refugees fled to Canada after Soviet troops crushed an uprising against Communist rule in November 1956.


Almost 100 per cent of Quebec’s population increase of 218,000 people came from immigration, Payeur said. Quebec’s growth, though record-setting for the province, was lower than that of any other province, except Newfoundland and Labrador.

The new data comes less than a week after federal Immigration Minister Marc Miller said he plans to set targets next fall to reduce the percentage of Canada’s population made up by temporary residents.

Alberta saw the most population growth in 2023 — 4.3 per cent _ according to Statistics Canada data adapted by the Quebec statistics agency, followed by Prince Edward Island with 3.6 per cent.

Ontario’s population grew by 3.4 per cent, even while it lost 36,197 residents to other provinces, Statistics Canada said. Alberta gained 55,107 people from other provinces, the largest gain since comparable data became available in 1972. Most of those new arrivals came from Ontario and British Columbia, Charbonneau said.


In Quebec, which reported only 400 more births than deaths in 2023, the number of temporary residents rose by 174,200 people and the number of permanent immigrants rose by 52,800. Across Canada, births outnumbered deaths by 31,103, Statistics Canada data show.

The provincial statistics agency said Quebec now has around 560,000 temporary residents in its population of almost nine million people, including 234,000 temporary foreign workers, 177,000 asylum seekers and 124,000 international students. This is the second year in a row that the increase in the number of temporary residents has broken records. In 2022, it rose by 150,700.

“It’s clear that in a context where the provincial government says we won’t bring in more than 50,000, 60,000 permanent immigrants a year, employers are turning to temporary workers,” said Adele Garnier, a professor at Universite Laval who studies migration. She added that Quebec faces a labour shortage and has a population that’s aging faster than that of many other provinces.


Across Canada, a growing number of temporary workers are graduates of Canadian universities who are able to get open work permits and a pathway to permanent residence, she said.

In Quebec, which controls many aspects of its immigration system, a similar program is available to graduates of the province’s universities — though last year the government imposed French-language requirements on the program.

A recent study by the Institut du Quebec, a Montreal-based think tank, found that about a quarter of temporary workers in the province were in that program, while 36 per cent were in the country under the temporary foreign workers program, which allows employers to hire foreigners to meet specific needs.

Most temporary workers were in the manufacturing, professional services, or retail and warehousing sectors, the study found.
 
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spaminator

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'Migrant influencer' who told followers squat in U.S. homes a wanted man: Report
Author of the article:postmedia News
Published Mar 27, 2024 • Last updated 2 days ago • 2 minute read

A “migrant influencer” who went viral for encouraging others to enter the United States and squat at abandoned homes is reportedly on the run from immigration officials.


According to the New York Post, Leonel Moreno crossed into the U.S. two years ago at Eagle Pass, Texas.


At the time, the Venezuelan national was registered for a program — Alternatives to Detention — that tracks migrants using ankle monitors or other technology.

However, Moreno didn’t comply with the program and was listed as an “absconder” in Immigration and Customs Enforcement documents after he didn’t attend an immigration court date in November 2022.

In mid-March, Moreno shared a video to TikTok that encouraged migrants to come to the U.S. and invoke “squatter’s rights” to empty and dilapidated homes so that they can be renovated and sold for profit.

Reports indicate the video racked up 3 million views before the account was suspended by TikTok. It appears he created a new TikTok account this week.


Meanwhile, the video lives on at his Instagram account.

In other social media posts, Moreno brags of not working and buying supplies for his baby with food stamps while flaunting wads of cash.

“I don’t like to work,” he tells his followers. “Boys, in the U.S. there are a million tricks, a million things to do” to live for free.

Moreno, who is married with a child, said his family receives $350 a week from the federal government and claimed to bring in $1,000 a day begging for cash.

Moreno appears to be hiding in plain sight while living in a suburb of Columbus, Ohio. In one video, he speaks in front of a Gahanna police vehicle.


Local authorities say they are aware of the video but have been unable to find him.

“To date, our agency has had no contact with this individual, and we are unaware of his location,” police in Gahanna told the Post.


According to ICE documents, Moreno’s point of contact was a Catholic charity in Miami.

Moreno was released from U.S. custody due to a lack of space in detention facilities, documents say.

A former ICE field office director called the program that tracks migrants in the U.S. a “failure” for President Joe Biden and his administration.

“We have witnessed yet another individual who was allowed entry into the U.S. under the ATD program, only to abscond and make TikTok videos explaining how to break the law,” John Fabbricatore told the Post.

“The question stands — how many thousands more are out there unaccounted for after fleeing this program?”
 

spaminator

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Pakistan Airlines flight attendant busted for counterfeit Canadian port stamps

Author of the article:Brad Hunter
Published Apr 01, 2024 • Last updated 9 hours ago • 2 minute read

PIA flight attendant Hina Sani was busted in Toronto for illegal passports. FACEBOOK
PIA flight attendant Hina Sani was busted in Toronto for illegal passports. FACEBOOK
Pakistan International Airlines (PIA) has suspended a flight attendant nabbed at Pearson International Airport for allegedly possessing illegal counterfeit CBSA port stamps, The Toronto Sun has learned.


The incident falls hot on the heels of a report suggesting that at least eight PIA crew members have vanished in Toronto looking for asylum.


According to reports in the Pakistani media, flight attendant Hina Sani was detained by Canada Border Services Agency when she was allegedly found to be in possession of the counterfeit stamps.

Last week, Sani was working Flight PK-789 from Lahore to Toronto.

PIA flight attendant Hina Sani was busted in Toronto for illegal passports. FACEBOOK
PIA flight attendant Hina Sani was busted in Toronto for illegal passports. FACEBOOK
Pakistani media reported the incident wasn’t the first with Sani. Previously, she had been nabbed for allegedly bringing contraband into Canada.

On her Facebook page, the social media high-flier made no mention of her troubles.

“The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) can confirm that on March 28, 2024, a flight attendant for Pakistan International Airlines arriving at Pearson International Airport was sent to Secondary for examination and within one of their suitcases the examining border services officer located two counterfeit CBSA port stamps,” CBSA said in a statement to the Sun.


“Hina SANI, 43, has been charged with 1 count of Smuggling, contrary to section 159(1) of the Customs Act, 1 count of Forgery Instruments contrary to section 368.1 of the Criminal Code of Canada, and 1 count of Counterfeiting Mark contrary to section 376(2)(b) of the Criminal Code of Canada.”

It was revealed that additional flight attendants accompanying Sani on the flight were declared “no-flyers” for Toronto by PIA. The Pakistan Observer reported that the crew received special permission from an airline executive using his identification.

Two other flight attendants were questioned.

“Full cooperation will be given to the Canadian authorities, and any legal action suggested will be taken,” PIA spokesman Abdullah Khan said, confirming the incident.


Last month, PIA flight attendant Maryam Raza failed to report for duty in Toronto for Flight PK-784 from Toronto to Karachi. Sources told local media that she left a note with her uniform in the room reading: “Thank you, PIA.”

In January, flight attendant Faiza Mukhtar, 40, also did a runner on a flight from Islamabad to Toronto. She did not show for a flight from Toronto to Karachi. She left behind a four-year-old son.

If she surfaces, she will be the subject of disciplinary action, the airline said.

Meanwhile, PIA spokesman Khan told CTV News that at least eight flight attendants “have gone missing” in Toronto.

“Since probably October of 2022, the number of the people that have opted for asylum has increased tremendously,” Khan said.

“None of those crew members that disappeared in the last 1 1/2 years have come back. So they were granted asylum for one way or the other, and that probably has encouraged others to do so.”

Khan wasn’t sure why crew members were disappearing in Canada. One reason could be the unsettling climate in Pakistan, where the Canadian government cautions there is a “high threat of terrorism”.

Khan added: “So I naturally assumed that all of them have been given asylum because I don’t think they would be living there illegally.”

bhunter@postmedia.com

@HunterTOSun
1712197554750.png1712197620130.png
 

spaminator

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Influx of asylum seekers surprises Canada and cities bear the cost
Author of the article:Bloomberg News
Bloomberg News
Randy Thanthong-Knight
Published Apr 03, 2024 • 3 minute read

The number of asylum seekers has skyrocketed in recent years, but the Trudeau government has no plan for how to deal with the issue.

Canadian cities are being overwhelmed by a record surge of newcomers seeking asylum, straining their budgets and pushing temporary shelters beyond their limits.


In Peel, a suburban region in greater Toronto, the shelter system is running at 300% of capacity, with asylum-seekers occupying more than 70% of the beds and many more camping on the streets, according to Patrick Brown, the mayor of Brampton.


“It’s an ugly situation. If Canada’s going to allow more asylum claimants into our country, we need to make sure that they’re not left abandoned, and frankly, what we’ve seen is too much of that,” said Brown, whose city of almost 700,000 people is not far from Toronto Pearson, the country’s busiest airport.

Brampton’s stress is a microcosm of Canada’s struggle to cope with rapid increases in the number of immigrants seeking refuge. Shelter systems in Montreal, Ottawa and Vancouver are also over capacity — exacerbating a shortage of available places for the homeless population.


A rise in asylum claimants has become a major political issue across many countries, including the U.S., where cities such as New York and Chicago are grappling with how to manage the waves of migrants who’ve traveled across the southern border. Although Canada’s geography means it sees a fraction as many irregular border crossings as the U.S., there’s been an increase in the numbers arriving by air — particularly from Mexico.

The influx has prompted Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s government to make policy shifts. Last year, Trudeau and U.S. President Joe Biden agreed to end a pact that had resulted in asylum-seekers crossing into Canada from the U.S. at a location known as Roxham Road. Then, in February, Trudeau’s government reimposed visa rules for many Mexican citizens.


And last month, Canada said it plans to reduce the size of its temporary resident population, a group that includes asylum claimants and foreigners on temporary work permits.

Mexico is by far the largest source country for those seeking asylum in Canada, followed by Haiti, Turkey, India and Colombia. In Brampton, about 80% came from five African countries, including Kenya and Nigeria, Brown said.

The numbers have risen because of the overlapping conflicts and crises in other nations, the resumption of international travel after the pandemic and Canada’s broadening of the legal basis for asylum claims.

Trudeau’s government — under pressure from Quebec Premier Francois Legault and Toronto Mayor Olivia Chow — offered about $360 million in January to provinces and cities to help deal with “extraordinary interim housing pressures” from asylum claimants. It says it’s transferred about $750 million to other levels of government since 2017 to help with asylum-related housing costs.


Still, Brown’s contention is that the national government hasn’t done enough. Last year, his region had a shortfall of more than $20 million to care for them and the mayor projects that to triple this year.

“If we’re going to be a country that offers safe harbour to those fleeing adversity, they can’t be left out in the frigid cold in that process,” Brown said.

Student Population
The rapid growth in asylum seekers in Canada is happening in tandem with record population gains, driven by foreign workers and international students. But frustration over housing shortages has forced Trudeau’s government to scale back on its immigration ambitions in recent months — among other things, it’s capping the number of foreign-study permits.


Brampton is also a focal point of colleges trying to cash in on the demand from those international students, many of whom see higher education as a pathway to settling in Canada. The number of international students in the country has tripled to around 1 million in less than a decade.

Many of the new arrivals faced soaring rents and lack of part-time jobs, and some, according to Brown, are “living in unfortunate conditions — sometimes in encampments, sometimes 25 students in a basement apartment.” Some asylum seekers in Brampton also live in a “large encampment outside the shelter system itself,” Brown said. Prior to the surge that started around mid-2023, asylum claimants took up just 2% of local shelter beds, he said.

“It’s put a significant cost barrier on cities. Cities have never funded this before,” Brown said. Under Ontario law, local governments can’t run budget deficits to pay for such unexpected costs. “So if you have people living on the sidewalk, that means you either have to take it from your public transit fund, your police fund, your paramedic fund, it’s just a negative cycle. We’re hoping it doesn’t get to that.”
 
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pgs

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Nov 29, 2008
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B.C.
Influx of asylum seekers surprises Canada and cities bear the cost
Author of the article:Bloomberg News
Bloomberg News
Randy Thanthong-Knight
Published Apr 03, 2024 • 3 minute read

The number of asylum seekers has skyrocketed in recent years, but the Trudeau government has no plan for how to deal with the issue.

Canadian cities are being overwhelmed by a record surge of newcomers seeking asylum, straining their budgets and pushing temporary shelters beyond their limits.


In Peel, a suburban region in greater Toronto, the shelter system is running at 300% of capacity, with asylum-seekers occupying more than 70% of the beds and many more camping on the streets, according to Patrick Brown, the mayor of Brampton.


“It’s an ugly situation. If Canada’s going to allow more asylum claimants into our country, we need to make sure that they’re not left abandoned, and frankly, what we’ve seen is too much of that,” said Brown, whose city of almost 700,000 people is not far from Toronto Pearson, the country’s busiest airport.

Brampton’s stress is a microcosm of Canada’s struggle to cope with rapid increases in the number of immigrants seeking refuge. Shelter systems in Montreal, Ottawa and Vancouver are also over capacity — exacerbating a shortage of available places for the homeless population.


A rise in asylum claimants has become a major political issue across many countries, including the U.S., where cities such as New York and Chicago are grappling with how to manage the waves of migrants who’ve traveled across the southern border. Although Canada’s geography means it sees a fraction as many irregular border crossings as the U.S., there’s been an increase in the numbers arriving by air — particularly from Mexico.

The influx has prompted Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s government to make policy shifts. Last year, Trudeau and U.S. President Joe Biden agreed to end a pact that had resulted in asylum-seekers crossing into Canada from the U.S. at a location known as Roxham Road. Then, in February, Trudeau’s government reimposed visa rules for many Mexican citizens.


And last month, Canada said it plans to reduce the size of its temporary resident population, a group that includes asylum claimants and foreigners on temporary work permits.

Mexico is by far the largest source country for those seeking asylum in Canada, followed by Haiti, Turkey, India and Colombia. In Brampton, about 80% came from five African countries, including Kenya and Nigeria, Brown said.

The numbers have risen because of the overlapping conflicts and crises in other nations, the resumption of international travel after the pandemic and Canada’s broadening of the legal basis for asylum claims.

Trudeau’s government — under pressure from Quebec Premier Francois Legault and Toronto Mayor Olivia Chow — offered about $360 million in January to provinces and cities to help deal with “extraordinary interim housing pressures” from asylum claimants. It says it’s transferred about $750 million to other levels of government since 2017 to help with asylum-related housing costs.


Still, Brown’s contention is that the national government hasn’t done enough. Last year, his region had a shortfall of more than $20 million to care for them and the mayor projects that to triple this year.

“If we’re going to be a country that offers safe harbour to those fleeing adversity, they can’t be left out in the frigid cold in that process,” Brown said.

Student Population
The rapid growth in asylum seekers in Canada is happening in tandem with record population gains, driven by foreign workers and international students. But frustration over housing shortages has forced Trudeau’s government to scale back on its immigration ambitions in recent months — among other things, it’s capping the number of foreign-study permits.


Brampton is also a focal point of colleges trying to cash in on the demand from those international students, many of whom see higher education as a pathway to settling in Canada. The number of international students in the country has tripled to around 1 million in less than a decade.

Many of the new arrivals faced soaring rents and lack of part-time jobs, and some, according to Brown, are “living in unfortunate conditions — sometimes in encampments, sometimes 25 students in a basement apartment.” Some asylum seekers in Brampton also live in a “large encampment outside the shelter system itself,” Brown said. Prior to the surge that started around mid-2023, asylum claimants took up just 2% of local shelter beds, he said.

“It’s put a significant cost barrier on cities. Cities have never funded this before,” Brown said. Under Ontario law, local governments can’t run budget deficits to pay for such unexpected costs. “So if you have people living on the sidewalk, that means you either have to take it from your public transit fund, your police fund, your paramedic fund, it’s just a negative cycle. We’re hoping it doesn’t get to that.”
File under no shit Sherlock .
 

spaminator

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Denver official tries to ship migrants to Canadian border
Author of the article:Denette Wilford
Published Apr 03, 2024 • 2 minute read

A city official in a migrant shelter in Denver was caught on camera telling newcomers to try their luck in other U.S. cities — and Canada.


Video obtained by local outlet KUSA shows Denver’s Newcomer Communications Liaison Andres Carrera, who also serves as Mayor Mike Johnston’s political director, telling migrants that things are bleak in Denver and the sanctuary city can’t support them.


“The opportunities are over,” Carrera told the group in Spanish, according to the outlet.

“New York gives you more. Chicago gives you more,” he insisted. “So I suggest you go there where there is longer-term shelter. There are also more job opportunities there.”

He also offered up Miami as an alternative destination, claiming it has more resources and more Spanish speakers.

The migrants arrived in Denver on March 26 on a bus from Texas organized by Gov. Greg Abbott, a city spokesperson said.

Abbott has previously boasted about overwhelming Denver and other sanctuary cities with migrants who have crossed the U.S. border from Mexico.

“We have received too many migrants and that is why we ran out of resources,” Carrera said to the crowd inside the shelter.

“We are not going to block you if you want to stay here,” Carrera continued, but warned, “If you stay here you are going to suffer even more and I don’t want to see this.”



But Denver is essentially making the choice easy for migrants by enforcing stringent limits on how long they can stay in city shelters — two weeks for individuals, six weeks for families with children.

The city has even offered to pay for migrants’ bus fare to destinations of their choice.

“You don’t have to walk anywhere, we can buy you a free ticket,” Carrera tells the crowd in the clip.

“You can go to any city. We can take you up to the Canadian border, wherever!”

A city spokesperson clarified to the outlet that Denver is not buying bus tickets to Canadian cities but will help migrants travel to other U.S. cities near the Canadian border, if it’s requested.

In February, Johnston said the city was running “out of space” for migrants in shelters and began trying to clear out the newcomers who have entered the city.

As of March 31, a reported 40,283 migrants have entered the city, Newsweek reported, while 754 are currently sheltered.

“OK, who wants to travel to different cities where there is more work?” Carrera asked the migrants, who barely blinked at his pitch.

“Who wants to stay in Denver?” Carrera asked, to which one migrant replied, “Todos” — which translates to “everyone.”
 
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Dixie Cup

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Sep 16, 2006
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Edmonton
Denver official tries to ship migrants to Canadian border
Author of the article:Denette Wilford
Published Apr 03, 2024 • 2 minute read

A city official in a migrant shelter in Denver was caught on camera telling newcomers to try their luck in other U.S. cities — and Canada.


Video obtained by local outlet KUSA shows Denver’s Newcomer Communications Liaison Andres Carrera, who also serves as Mayor Mike Johnston’s political director, telling migrants that things are bleak in Denver and the sanctuary city can’t support them.


“The opportunities are over,” Carrera told the group in Spanish, according to the outlet.

“New York gives you more. Chicago gives you more,” he insisted. “So I suggest you go there where there is longer-term shelter. There are also more job opportunities there.”

He also offered up Miami as an alternative destination, claiming it has more resources and more Spanish speakers.

The migrants arrived in Denver on March 26 on a bus from Texas organized by Gov. Greg Abbott, a city spokesperson said.

Abbott has previously boasted about overwhelming Denver and other sanctuary cities with migrants who have crossed the U.S. border from Mexico.

“We have received too many migrants and that is why we ran out of resources,” Carrera said to the crowd inside the shelter.

“We are not going to block you if you want to stay here,” Carrera continued, but warned, “If you stay here you are going to suffer even more and I don’t want to see this.”



But Denver is essentially making the choice easy for migrants by enforcing stringent limits on how long they can stay in city shelters — two weeks for individuals, six weeks for families with children.

The city has even offered to pay for migrants’ bus fare to destinations of their choice.

“You don’t have to walk anywhere, we can buy you a free ticket,” Carrera tells the crowd in the clip.

“You can go to any city. We can take you up to the Canadian border, wherever!”

A city spokesperson clarified to the outlet that Denver is not buying bus tickets to Canadian cities but will help migrants travel to other U.S. cities near the Canadian border, if it’s requested.

In February, Johnston said the city was running “out of space” for migrants in shelters and began trying to clear out the newcomers who have entered the city.

As of March 31, a reported 40,283 migrants have entered the city, Newsweek reported, while 754 are currently sheltered.

“OK, who wants to travel to different cities where there is more work?” Carrera asked the migrants, who barely blinked at his pitch.

“Who wants to stay in Denver?” Carrera asked, to which one migrant replied, “Todos” — which translates to “everyone.”
Huh, who could have seen that coming?
 

Taxslave2

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Aug 13, 2022
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Denver official tries to ship migrants to Canadian border
Author of the article:Denette Wilford
Published Apr 03, 2024 • 2 minute read

A city official in a migrant shelter in Denver was caught on camera telling newcomers to try their luck in other U.S. cities — and Canada.


Video obtained by local outlet KUSA shows Denver’s Newcomer Communications Liaison Andres Carrera, who also serves as Mayor Mike Johnston’s political director, telling migrants that things are bleak in Denver and the sanctuary city can’t support them.


“The opportunities are over,” Carrera told the group in Spanish, according to the outlet.

“New York gives you more. Chicago gives you more,” he insisted. “So I suggest you go there where there is longer-term shelter. There are also more job opportunities there.”

He also offered up Miami as an alternative destination, claiming it has more resources and more Spanish speakers.

The migrants arrived in Denver on March 26 on a bus from Texas organized by Gov. Greg Abbott, a city spokesperson said.

Abbott has previously boasted about overwhelming Denver and other sanctuary cities with migrants who have crossed the U.S. border from Mexico.

“We have received too many migrants and that is why we ran out of resources,” Carrera said to the crowd inside the shelter.

“We are not going to block you if you want to stay here,” Carrera continued, but warned, “If you stay here you are going to suffer even more and I don’t want to see this.”



But Denver is essentially making the choice easy for migrants by enforcing stringent limits on how long they can stay in city shelters — two weeks for individuals, six weeks for families with children.

The city has even offered to pay for migrants’ bus fare to destinations of their choice.

“You don’t have to walk anywhere, we can buy you a free ticket,” Carrera tells the crowd in the clip.

“You can go to any city. We can take you up to the Canadian border, wherever!”

A city spokesperson clarified to the outlet that Denver is not buying bus tickets to Canadian cities but will help migrants travel to other U.S. cities near the Canadian border, if it’s requested.

In February, Johnston said the city was running “out of space” for migrants in shelters and began trying to clear out the newcomers who have entered the city.

As of March 31, a reported 40,283 migrants have entered the city, Newsweek reported, while 754 are currently sheltered.

“OK, who wants to travel to different cities where there is more work?” Carrera asked the migrants, who barely blinked at his pitch.

“Who wants to stay in Denver?” Carrera asked, to which one migrant replied, “Todos” — which translates to “everyone.”
Finally the far left states are suffering from the effects of their own poor policies that have created serious problems for towns in border states for decades.
 
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Serryah

Executive Branch Member
Dec 3, 2008
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New Brunswick
Denver official tries to ship migrants to Canadian border
Author of the article:Denette Wilford
Published Apr 03, 2024 • 2 minute read

A city official in a migrant shelter in Denver was caught on camera telling newcomers to try their luck in other U.S. cities — and Canada.


Video obtained by local outlet KUSA shows Denver’s Newcomer Communications Liaison Andres Carrera, who also serves as Mayor Mike Johnston’s political director, telling migrants that things are bleak in Denver and the sanctuary city can’t support them.


“The opportunities are over,” Carrera told the group in Spanish, according to the outlet.

“New York gives you more. Chicago gives you more,” he insisted. “So I suggest you go there where there is longer-term shelter. There are also more job opportunities there.”

He also offered up Miami as an alternative destination, claiming it has more resources and more Spanish speakers.

The migrants arrived in Denver on March 26 on a bus from Texas organized by Gov. Greg Abbott, a city spokesperson said.

Abbott has previously boasted about overwhelming Denver and other sanctuary cities with migrants who have crossed the U.S. border from Mexico.

“We have received too many migrants and that is why we ran out of resources,” Carrera said to the crowd inside the shelter.

“We are not going to block you if you want to stay here,” Carrera continued, but warned, “If you stay here you are going to suffer even more and I don’t want to see this.”



But Denver is essentially making the choice easy for migrants by enforcing stringent limits on how long they can stay in city shelters — two weeks for individuals, six weeks for families with children.

The city has even offered to pay for migrants’ bus fare to destinations of their choice.

“You don’t have to walk anywhere, we can buy you a free ticket,” Carrera tells the crowd in the clip.

“You can go to any city. We can take you up to the Canadian border, wherever!”

A city spokesperson clarified to the outlet that Denver is not buying bus tickets to Canadian cities but will help migrants travel to other U.S. cities near the Canadian border, if it’s requested.

In February, Johnston said the city was running “out of space” for migrants in shelters and began trying to clear out the newcomers who have entered the city.

As of March 31, a reported 40,283 migrants have entered the city, Newsweek reported, while 754 are currently sheltered.

“OK, who wants to travel to different cities where there is more work?” Carrera asked the migrants, who barely blinked at his pitch.

“Who wants to stay in Denver?” Carrera asked, to which one migrant replied, “Todos” — which translates to “everyone.”

So... this guy wants to see more immigrants die on the border because they're trying to cross illegally.

Absolutely not shocked.
 

spaminator

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Trudeau's out-of-control immigration hurting jobs and housing
StatsCan says population growth from immigration is far outpacing job growth in Canada as unemployment rises again.


Author of the article:Brian Lilley
Published Apr 05, 2024 • 3 minute read

Canada’s out-of-control immigration numbers are not only having a negative impact on housing, they are now hurting the employment situation. In the same week that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said that we are bringing in people faster than we can absorb them in the housing market, Statistics Canada issued a warning on jobs.


The March unemployment rate stood at 6.1%, a full point higher than the 5.1% recorded in March of 2023. According to StatsCan, we are bringing in people faster than we are creating jobs.


Over the last year, employment has grown by 1.6% or 324,000 jobs while Canada’s population has grown by 3.2% or more than one million people considered working age. There are now 247,000 more people listed as unemployed in Canada than there were a year ago.

In Ontario, where the largest population growth has happened and where most of the immigrant population settles, there are 576,000 people unemployed, an increase of 134,000 compared to March 2023. In that same time frame, the province’s unemployment rate has risen from 5.3% to 6.7% despite Ontario adding 86,000 new jobs in that time period.


Simply put, we are bringing in people faster than we can house them and faster than the economy can create adequate jobs. It’s madness and it needs to be dealt with but while the man in charge, Justin Trudeau, is acknowledging there is a problem, he won’t take any responsibility.

“In 2017, temporary residents made up about 2% of Canada’s population. Right now, they make up about seven and a half percent of Canada’s population. That’s where all the pressure on our housing, or a big part of the pressure on our housing markets, and other areas are coming from,” Trudeau said.

Temporary residents are part of the immigration system, that would be something the federal government is responsible for. Even if a college, university or province, wants to have an international student enter the country, the final say, and this includes on how many can come, rests with the federal government.


Listening to Justin Trudeau, you would think he and his government were powerless to do anything as these numbers climbed over the past several years. Standing with Sean Fraser, the man who messed up immigration and is now in charge of housing, Trudeau blamed the provinces for the more than 3 million temporary residents that his government allowed into the country.

Trudeau’s solution?

Reduce the temporary resident portion of our population down to 5% from the current 7.5%.

That is still not likely enough to solve the problem.

Trudeau is only now admitting that immigration levels are too high, but as recently as November was responding to questions about lower housing costs in the United States by suggesting that Conservative Leader Pierre Poilievre was anti-immigration.


“As for the difference between Canada and the United States, one of the differences is that our population is growing much faster than the population in the United States. I am certain the leader of the opposition was not about to suggest he was anti-immigration, because we all know immigration creates jobs and prosperity,” Trudeau said.

Well, it used to create jobs and prosperity but then the Liberals broke the system. They ramped up immigration levels, on all fronts, to unsustainable levels.



Our permanent resident intake was 431,645 in 2022 and we are on our way to 500,000. We took in nearly 900,000 foreign students last year. On the refugee front, we’ve seen a spike from 16,000 people seeking asylum in 2015 when Trudeau took office to 137,000 last year.

We are in the middle of a housing crisis – we don’t have enough homes for the people who live here already and that is creating an affordability crisis. Now, we are adding on a growing level of unemployment, which could soon be headed for crisis levels.

In the middle of all this, no sane country would admit one million new people in the space of nine months.

Under Trudeau though, we don’t have policy based in sanity or reality but on his feelings.