Public Education in 2020

taxslave

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 25, 2008
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Also true. Don't know how to "fix" that - perhaps having rural parents more involved somehow?? Wiser people than I may have a solution to that but it is a concern for sure.
The problem is that remote communities often don't get to pick and chose teachers. They pretty much have to take whatever comes their way. For some reason that I don't understand many so-called professionals do not want to live outside of large urban areas.
 

Dixie Cup

House Member
Sep 16, 2006
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Edmonton
Listened to an interview on CBC last week with the rower who won silver at the 1984 Olympics in one of team rowing events. She is now a professor with the International Center for Olympic Studies. How can this even be a thing other than a convenient place to employ connected people.

It's like they sit around when they are not pre taping holiday messages and try to think up crazy government departments. What accountability is involved with Olympic Studies? No doubt there is a bus load of them that attend each Olympic games on someone else's nickel.

Why change now? Odd to me that Silken Lauman was not mentioned during the interview.


"The primary mission of the International Centre for Olympic Studies at Western University is the generation and dissemination of academic scholarship focused specifically on the socio-cultural study of the Olympic Games and the Olympic Movement."
Re the last line - Huh???
 
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Dixie Cup

House Member
Sep 16, 2006
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Edmonton
The problem is that remote communities often don't get to pick and chose teachers. They pretty much have to take whatever comes their way. For some reason that I don't understand many so-called professionals do not want to live outside of large urban areas.
Guess they don't like "fresh air" & "community spirit" that some rural areas have. It's a good life but not for everyone apparently.
 

bob the dog

Electoral Member
Aug 14, 2020
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The problem is that remote communities often don't get to pick and chose teachers. They pretty much have to take whatever comes their way. For some reason that I don't understand many so-called professionals do not want to live outside of large urban areas.
Online learning is the answer. Students are the last to benefit from hanging around in the school system until their late teens. All they know when they graduate is how to be a student. .
 

bob the dog

Electoral Member
Aug 14, 2020
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Never tried the internet connection outside of a city have you.
Can't imagine it is a problem unless they want it to be with all the low earth orbit satellites Elon Musk is launching. Bell just got a grant from Canada to do the same. Many in my area of NW Ontario have satellite service.

My point about the school system being that it is actually a limiting factor in human development. The three R's are a given through the use of money and the internet before a child is 5. History is fun for many but it is boring to a 12 year old. Working in the family business would be far more interesting and they are terrific employees. Schools dress it up with the extra curriculars like sports that really should be community club stuff. And then the layers kick in with each having to be recognized with superior pay from the level below. All kinds of people making big money running the bureaucracy that don't give a rats ass about your kid the day they finish the program. Good luck and good bye.

Apparently I do like to bitch about it,
 

bob the dog

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Aug 14, 2020
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At one time typing was a marketable skill and part of school curriculums. How is it that we can now all get by?

Necessity is the mother of invention they say.
 
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Danbones

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Sep 23, 2015
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Op-Ed: Nancy Pelosi's Totalitarian Effort To Change the English Language​


The English language has been around for a long time. It works pretty well and it communicates clearly. So when someone says, “I love my daughter,” you know what he means.

But like any good leftist, Nancy Pelosi can’t leave well enough alone. She has to change things and make them “better.” She has to make them more “inclusive,” less “racist” or “sexist.”

That urge applies to everything, including the way members of the House of Representatives use the English language. Using normal English is bad, don’t you know. It might be construed as a “micro-aggression.”

But not to worry, because Nancy Pelosi has fixed this.

She has pushed through changes to the official Rules of the House of Representatives to take out words that were deemed insulting or offensive.

TRENDING: Josh Hammer: The Best Thing Trump Can Do for the Movement He Started Is to Just Go Away

Which words, you ask? How about “father,” “mother,” “son” and “daughter.” They have been officially struck from part of Rule 23 of the House. Also struck were the horrible words “brother,” “sister,” “uncle” and “aunt.”

And for good measure, “husband,” “wife,” “father-in-law” and “mother-in-law” were also struck.

Diarrhea should not be allowed to run for orffice...especially more than once.

I can't believe tec and sarryah and cliffy support these freaks...wow!!!
 
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Danbones

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Sep 23, 2015
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Guess they don't like "fresh air" & "community spirit" that some rural areas have. It's a good life but not for everyone apparently.
No, I have one side of the family are all teachers -they like to cottage. They belong to a cottage club that is all U of T affiliated.
;)
Useless and stupid and nothing without their father's money as my very accomplished father used to say...quite correctly too I might add.

They need several families of grade 8s to live there in that area to do anything that requires any intelligence and/or skill at all.
 

bob the dog

Electoral Member
Aug 14, 2020
551
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$170 Billion for education in the Biden stimulus to get kids back to school. That's a lot of money. Educators will be happy.
 

bob the dog

Electoral Member
Aug 14, 2020
551
381
63
Ontario announcing one more go at it before summer break with kids back to school Feb 16. Might last a month.

Hardly worth the $25 billion Ontario spends each year on education. Plus all kids have smart phones and Siri or Bixby or someone else to answer every question on earth. This is an area where money can be saved. No idea how educators will survive but such is life.

Ontario debt of $325 billion is not even included in the $1.2 trillion the feds owe. I don't see how we continue to get credit.
 

bob the dog

Electoral Member
Aug 14, 2020
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Laurentian University declaring bankruptcy says more about the well compensated bureaucracy than any lack of funding imo.

Absolutely don't need it. Close the doors and quit spending good money. Life will go on.
 

spaminator

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Oct 26, 2009
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Boy, 12, seriously injured, girl hurt after snowplow topples Whitby school fence

One child is 12, according to a source, and suffering head injuries
Author of the article:
Jack Boland, Jenny Yuen
Publishing date:
Feb 16, 2021 • 18 hours ago • 2 minute read
Noel Septimo is pictured at the location where two Whitby school children were hurt on Feb. 16, 2021, when a snowplow topped a chain-link fence. He helped dig the children out. Photo by Jack Boland /Toronto Sun
Article content

A 12-year-old boy suffered serious injuries and a girl was also hurt when a snowplow toppled a fence at a Whitby public school Tuesday morning.

Durham Regional Police reported that “the injuries were caused by snow that had been pushed by a snowplow” at a townhouse complex adjacent to Julie Payette Public School, near Dundas and Brock Sts., at around 9:40 a.m.

The children were playing on the school property next to the fence line at the time, Const. Conrad Wong said.
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According to a source, the boy was found suffering from head injuries after being trapped for 15 minutes. Police confirmed he was transported to a local hospital with “serious injuries.”

A girl “roughly the same age” was also hurt and was treated on scene by paramedics for minor injuries, Wong said.

Noel Septimo, a resident in the townhouse complex next to the school, said he was shovelling his driveway when he heard cries for help. A snowplow operator came running up to him to ask for assistance.
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When Septimo ran to the snowplow down the street from his townhouse, he saw the huge mound of snow that had buried the two children.

“Somebody was screaming. And I ran over with him and helped to push up the fence,” said Septimo. “It was really heavy and the kids were stuck there.”

As the pair worked frantically to free the children — digging them out with Septimo’s shovels — other people came to their assistance. Police and paramedics arrived a short time later.

Septimo got the girl out first and kept asking “is there another, is there another?”

The boy was trapped deeper under the snow and the chain-link fence and had to be dug out.

The boy’s father told CP24 that parents have had safety concerns about the fence that separates the schoolyard from the townhouse complex. He added it was broken by a snowplow last year.

Area resident — Krista Garrett — said what happened was “horrible, it’s horrible.”

“I really not happy about it,” said Garrett, who wondered aloud what the snowplow was doing in the neighbourhood.

Amanda Levy, who lives in the townhouse complex, said she wasn’t sure what had happened initially.

“I was looking out my back door and saw all the cruisers coming into the school area, but I didn’t know what was going on,” said Levy.

The Ministry of Labour has been notified.
 

bob the dog

Electoral Member
Aug 14, 2020
551
381
63
Boy, 12, seriously injured, girl hurt after snowplow topples Whitby school fence

One child is 12, according to a source, and suffering head injuries
Author of the article:
Jack Boland, Jenny Yuen
Publishing date:
Feb 16, 2021 • 18 hours ago • 2 minute read
Noel Septimo is pictured at the location where two Whitby school children were hurt on Feb. 16, 2021, when a snowplow topped a chain-link fence. He helped dig the children out. Photo by Jack Boland /Toronto Sun
Article content

A 12-year-old boy suffered serious injuries and a girl was also hurt when a snowplow toppled a fence at a Whitby public school Tuesday morning.

Durham Regional Police reported that “the injuries were caused by snow that had been pushed by a snowplow” at a townhouse complex adjacent to Julie Payette Public School, near Dundas and Brock Sts., at around 9:40 a.m.

The children were playing on the school property next to the fence line at the time, Const. Conrad Wong said.
Advertisement
Story continues below
This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.
Article content

According to a source, the boy was found suffering from head injuries after being trapped for 15 minutes. Police confirmed he was transported to a local hospital with “serious injuries.”

A girl “roughly the same age” was also hurt and was treated on scene by paramedics for minor injuries, Wong said.

Noel Septimo, a resident in the townhouse complex next to the school, said he was shovelling his driveway when he heard cries for help. A snowplow operator came running up to him to ask for assistance.
Advertisement
Story continues below
This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.
Article content

When Septimo ran to the snowplow down the street from his townhouse, he saw the huge mound of snow that had buried the two children.

“Somebody was screaming. And I ran over with him and helped to push up the fence,” said Septimo. “It was really heavy and the kids were stuck there.”

As the pair worked frantically to free the children — digging them out with Septimo’s shovels — other people came to their assistance. Police and paramedics arrived a short time later.

Septimo got the girl out first and kept asking “is there another, is there another?”

The boy was trapped deeper under the snow and the chain-link fence and had to be dug out.

The boy’s father told CP24 that parents have had safety concerns about the fence that separates the schoolyard from the townhouse complex. He added it was broken by a snowplow last year.

Area resident — Krista Garrett — said what happened was “horrible, it’s horrible.”

“I really not happy about it,” said Garrett, who wondered aloud what the snowplow was doing in the neighbourhood.

Amanda Levy, who lives in the townhouse complex, said she wasn’t sure what had happened initially.

“I was looking out my back door and saw all the cruisers coming into the school area, but I didn’t know what was going on,” said Levy.

The Ministry of Labour has been notified.
Snow removal is not as easy as it sounds and something most politicians and many others have never done and are not capable of. Big snow makes it worse.

Sorry to hear about kids getting hurt but where are all the politicians, principles and vice principles responsible for recognizing hazards and enforcing a safe workplace and community.

Recognizing hazards and basic safety training might actually be a valuable skill to teach kids.

Imagine the hours burned up having everyone sit through days of safety training. Probably have not thought of it yet. High school safety officer should make good money.
 
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bob the dog

Electoral Member
Aug 14, 2020
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Tom Lamb who was given the honorary degree in Doctor of Laws from the University of Manitoba in 1969 had a Grade 3 formal education.

Personally feel we are very wrong about the benefits of the public school system other than for those earning from that sector. Little more than a bottomless pit of taxpayer money with no payback or accountability imo.
 
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