It's Climate Change I tell'ya!! IT'S CLIMATE CHANGE!!

taxme

Council Member
Feb 11, 2020
1,312
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i understand what you mean however if species continue to become extinct it can gradually effect the ecosystem.

Good old mother nature will always find ways to balance things out. You need to have more faith in good old mom. (y)

Just think about all of the natural disasters that have been going on since time began. Hurricanes, floods, you name it, have all done great damage to the environment but after all that the earth and life is still here and thriving. All of this climate change nonsense is just more lies and bullshit coming from the same bunch of fear mongering buffoons and idiots that brought us the covid lie and hoax.

People need to stop listening to those dumb ass bought and sold off lying politicians and the fake corporate lying media. They both lie. Our politicians have nothing to offer we the people but doom and gloom. When ever our politicians get involved with anything, everything they do or say or touch ends up going into a state of mayhem and chaos, and not to forget as to what ever they do ends up costing the taxpayer's hundreds of billions of their tax dollars. Politicians have truly become enemy #1 of we the people. We the people need to come up with a better system of government than what we have today. It's not working anymore. (y)
 

taxme

Council Member
Feb 11, 2020
1,312
581
113
Is Greta's 15 minutes not up yet?

Rumor has it that the useful idiot has been given an extra fifteen minutes of fame to really blow it. The useful idiot will soon have served her time and soon should be replaced with another blah-blah-blah useful idiot. The world is full of blah-blah useful idiots who are all to ready to serve and take their orders from the globalist elite. (n)
 

taxme

Council Member
Feb 11, 2020
1,312
581
113
Our federal government wants to bring in 500,000 people per year , it is not climate change . Every house , factory , farm , road etc. Cuts a little out of the natural state .

But of course I am pretty sure that all of those 500,000 new third world immigrants will not have any effect on the climate or environment, right? :ROFLMAO:
 

pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
21,795
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B.C.
With CPP you do realize don't you that it depends entirely on how much you contributed what you make when you actually collect. So some may get $750, others more & others less.
I was referring g toOAS .
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
29,197
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Trio win physics Nobel for work deciphering chaotic climate
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Niklas Pollard and Ludwig Burger and Simon Johnson
Publishing date:Oct 05, 2021 • 17 hours ago • 3 minute read • Join the conversation
Princeton University meteorologist Professor Syukuro Manabe, who won a share of the 2021 Nobel Prize in physics, talks in his home in Princeton, N.J., Oct. 5, 2021.
Princeton University meteorologist Professor Syukuro Manabe, who won a share of the 2021 Nobel Prize in physics, talks in his home in Princeton, N.J., Oct. 5, 2021. PHOTO BY MIKE SEGAR /REUTERS
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STOCKHOLM — Japanese-born American Syukuro Manabe, German Klaus Hasselmann and Italian Giorgio Parisi won the 2021 Nobel Prize in Physics on Tuesday for work that helps understand complex physical systems such as Earth’s changing climate.

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In a decision hailed by the UN weather agency as a sign of a consensus forming around man-made global warming, one half of the 10-million Swedish crown ($1.44 million) prize goes in equal parts to Manabe, 90, and Hasselmann, 89, for modeling earth’s climate and reliably predicting global warming.


The other half goes to Parisi for discovering in the early 1980s “hidden rules” behind seemingly random movements and swirls in gases or liquids that can also be applied to aspects of neuroscience, machine learning and starling flight formations.

“Syukuro Manabe and Klaus Hasselmann laid the foundation of our knowledge of the Earth’s climate and how humanity influences it,” the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said in a statement. “Giorgio Parisi is rewarded for his revolutionary contributions to the theory of disordered materials and random processes.”

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Hasselmann, who is at the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology in Hamburg, told Reuters from his home that he did not want to wake up from what he described as a beautiful dream.

“I am retired, you know, and have been a bit lazy lately. I am happy about the honor. The research continues,” he said.

The Academy said Manabe, who works at Princeton University in the United States, had laid the foundation in the 1960s for today’s understanding of Earth’s climate after moving to the United States from Japan to continue his research.

Interviewed by U.S. and Japanese journalists at his home, Manabe said he believed his award reflected the Academy’s recognition of climate change, which he said will continue to intensify with more droughts, torrential rains, warming of land masses and melting of polar ice.

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“Already, as you know, there are many phenomena showing climate change is happening,” he said in Japanese. “And I think that is the reason why the theme of climate change was selected for the award this time.”

Asked in English how he would address climate change skeptics, he smiled and replied, “That problem is about a million times more difficult than understanding climate change. It is very mysterious to me.”


Hasselmann, the Academy said, had developed models about 10 years later that became instrumental in proving that mankind’s carbon dioxide emissions cause rising temperatures in the atmosphere.

Parisi, who dialed into the media briefing announcing the winners, was asked for his message to world leaders due to meet for UN climate change talks in Glasgow, Scotland, from Oct. 31.

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“I think it is very urgent that we take real and very strong decisions and we move at a very strong pace,” said the 73-year-old Nobel laureate, who works at Sapienza University of Rome.

Scientists have spent decades urging climate change action on an often reluctant society, Hasselmann said in a recording published on the Nobel Prize’s website.

“It is just that people are not willing to accept the fact that they have to react now for something that will happen in a few years,” he said.

GLOBAL WARMING

Work on climate changes has been recognized by Nobel prizes before.

Former U.S. Vice President Al Gore and the UN climate panel received the Peace Prize in 2007 for galvanizing international action against global warming. William Nordhaus won one half of the 2018 Economics prize for integrating climate change into the Western economic growth model.

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Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg is also seen as a strong contender for this year’s Peace Prize, due to be announced from Oslo on Friday.

“Skeptics or deniers of scientific facts…are not so visible anymore and this climate science message has been heard,” World Meteorological Organization Secretary-General Petteri Taalas said of this year’s award.

Physics is the second Nobel to be awarded this week after Americans David Julius and Ardem Patapoutian won the prize for medicine on Monday for the discovery of receptors in the skin that sense temperature and touch.


The Nobel prizes were created in the will of Swedish dynamite inventor and businessman Alfred Nobel and have been awarded since 1901 with only a handful of interruptions, primarily due to the two world wars.

Like last year, there will be no banquet in Stockholm because of the COVID-19 pandemic. The laureates will receive their medals and diplomas in their home countries.

The physics prize announcement will be followed in the coming days by the awards for chemistry, literature, peace and economics.
 
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