It's Climate Change I tell'ya!! IT'S CLIMATE CHANGE!!

taxme

Council Member
Feb 11, 2020
1,312
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Aside from the expense of building you would have to pay turdOWE's carbon scam tax on the heat.

Everything that I pretty much buy these days has the carbon tax already hidden in and has been applied to whatever I buy or for heating. Plus, I have to also pay the GST and the PST. What and such a deal for just being a Canadian, eh?

Anyways, I always like to put most of my money into taxes because they are always going up. Taxes are great investment to put your money in, right? (y)
 

taxme

Council Member
Feb 11, 2020
1,312
581
113
I don’t want to see colder , my teeth were chattering for ten minutes after fueling up .

Well then, just keep your car at home, and take transit, and let transit do the fueling up for you. The transit workers do not mind fueling up their buses in the cold weather. Let the transit workers freeze their asses off. (y)
 

taxme

Council Member
Feb 11, 2020
1,312
581
113
Well, you tell the military to start building those garages ok? Also, it takes "fossil fuels" to heat said garages so it's likely cheaper to just let the vehicles run.
I remember well when pipes froze in the school having to stay at home because it was so cold so no heat.

The military will not listen to me. Boo-hoo. (n)
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
29,197
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U.S. declares 23 species, including ivory-billed woodpecker, extinct
Climate change, on top of other pressures, could make such disappearances more common, scientists say

Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Publishing date:Sep 29, 2021 • 8 hours ago • 2 minute read • Join the conversation
Ivory-billed woodpecker scientific name: Campephilus principalis.
Ivory-billed woodpecker scientific name: Campephilus principalis. PHOTO BY U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE /Georgia Wildlife Federation
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The ivory-billed woodpecker, whose last confirmed sighting was nearly 80 years ago, is one of 23 federally protected species that would be officially declared extinct – the most ever at one time – under a U.S. government proposal announced on Wednesday.

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Although the woodpecker and some of the other creatures proposed for removal from the U.S. endangered species list have been functionally extinct for decades, scientists have warned that human-caused climate change and habitat destruction could make such disappearances more common.


“With climate change and natural area loss pushing more and more species to the brink, now is the time to lift up proactive, collaborative, and innovative efforts to save America’s wildlife,” said U.S. Interior Secretary Deb Haaland.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposal would mark the largest group of animals and plants to be formally consigned to oblivion at once under America’s main wildlife protection law, the Endangered Species Act (ESA), since it was passed in 1973.

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Only 11 species previously listed under the act have been classified as extinct over the years, said Brian Hires, a spokesman for the Interior Department agency.

The 23 species now proposed for de-listing comprise a fruit bat, 11 birds, eight freshwater mussels, two types of fish, and a flowering plant in the mint family, the agency said.

The ivory-billed woodpecker, known to avid bird watchers as the “Lord God Bird,” was America’s largest woodpecker, but logging of old-growth forests in the U.S. South destroyed its habitat. Its last agreed-upon sighting was documented in 1944 in northeastern Louisiana, the service said.


Also on the list is Bachman’s warbler, considered one of America’s rarest songbirds. It has not been seen in the wild in the United States since 1962. The last documented sighting of the migratory bird anywhere was in Cuba in 1981.

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Both the woodpecker and the warbler were first listed as endangered in 1967 under the precursor to the ESA, the Endangered Species Preservation Act.

Avian populations as a whole have diminished by nearly 3 billion birds in North America since 1970 amid rapid environmental changes linked to human activity, according to the wildlife service.

Eleven of the species proposed for classification as extinct are native to Hawaii and the Pacific Islands, falling victim to heightened risks posed by their very limited geographic range, the service said.

The wildlife service will accept public comment for the next 60 days, and a final judgment will be published on Dec. 29, Hires said.

The Endangered Species Act has had some success stories, too, with 54 species removed from protected status due to their recovery, including the American peregrine falcon and bald eagle. Another 56 species have been “down-listed” from endangered to threatened. A total of more than 1,600 domestic animal and plant species are currently listed, Hires said.
1632984889258.png1632984922676.png
 
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Dixie Cup

House Member
Sep 16, 2006
3,622
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Edmonton
Yup, some die out others come into being. Typical of Mother Nature. That's not to say that we shouldn't try to save the animals who are on the verge of extinction due to PEOPLE KILLING THEM!! They readily adapt to changes in climate much better than humans so I don't believe that is an issue.
 

pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
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B.C.
Yup, some die out others come into being. Typical of Mother Nature. That's not to say that we shouldn't try to save the animals who are on the verge of extinction due to PEOPLE KILLING THEM!! They readily adapt to changes in climate much better than humans so I don't believe that is an issue.
Habitat loss .
 

pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
21,795
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B.C.
Ah back to climate change Lol
Our federal government wants to bring in 500,000 people per year , it is not climate change . Every house , factory , farm , road etc. Cuts a little out of the natural state .
 

taxme

Council Member
Feb 11, 2020
1,312
581
113
U.S. declares 23 species, including ivory-billed woodpecker, extinct
Climate change, on top of other pressures, could make such disappearances more common, scientists say

Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Publishing date:Sep 29, 2021 • 8 hours ago • 2 minute read • Join the conversation
Ivory-billed woodpecker scientific name: Campephilus principalis.
Ivory-billed woodpecker scientific name: Campephilus principalis. PHOTO BY U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE /Georgia Wildlife Federation
Article content
The ivory-billed woodpecker, whose last confirmed sighting was nearly 80 years ago, is one of 23 federally protected species that would be officially declared extinct – the most ever at one time – under a U.S. government proposal announced on Wednesday.

Advertisement
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

Article content
Although the woodpecker and some of the other creatures proposed for removal from the U.S. endangered species list have been functionally extinct for decades, scientists have warned that human-caused climate change and habitat destruction could make such disappearances more common.


“With climate change and natural area loss pushing more and more species to the brink, now is the time to lift up proactive, collaborative, and innovative efforts to save America’s wildlife,” said U.S. Interior Secretary Deb Haaland.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposal would mark the largest group of animals and plants to be formally consigned to oblivion at once under America’s main wildlife protection law, the Endangered Species Act (ESA), since it was passed in 1973.

Advertisement
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

Article content
Only 11 species previously listed under the act have been classified as extinct over the years, said Brian Hires, a spokesman for the Interior Department agency.

The 23 species now proposed for de-listing comprise a fruit bat, 11 birds, eight freshwater mussels, two types of fish, and a flowering plant in the mint family, the agency said.

The ivory-billed woodpecker, known to avid bird watchers as the “Lord God Bird,” was America’s largest woodpecker, but logging of old-growth forests in the U.S. South destroyed its habitat. Its last agreed-upon sighting was documented in 1944 in northeastern Louisiana, the service said.


Also on the list is Bachman’s warbler, considered one of America’s rarest songbirds. It has not been seen in the wild in the United States since 1962. The last documented sighting of the migratory bird anywhere was in Cuba in 1981.

Advertisement
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

Article content
Both the woodpecker and the warbler were first listed as endangered in 1967 under the precursor to the ESA, the Endangered Species Preservation Act.

Avian populations as a whole have diminished by nearly 3 billion birds in North America since 1970 amid rapid environmental changes linked to human activity, according to the wildlife service.

Eleven of the species proposed for classification as extinct are native to Hawaii and the Pacific Islands, falling victim to heightened risks posed by their very limited geographic range, the service said.

The wildlife service will accept public comment for the next 60 days, and a final judgment will be published on Dec. 29, Hires said.

The Endangered Species Act has had some success stories, too, with 54 species removed from protected status due to their recovery, including the American peregrine falcon and bald eagle. Another 56 species have been “down-listed” from endangered to threatened. A total of more than 1,600 domestic animal and plant species are currently listed, Hires said.
View attachment 10261View attachment 10262

So, who really really cares? Who wakes up in the morning and worries about some bird going extinct? I certainly do not. The world will not end because some bird, fish or wild animal goes extinct. The Saber tooth tiger went extinct a very long time ago and the world still survived. Like humans, all those mentioned above must learn to adapt to the changes going on around them in order to survive or they will die. It's their call and not mine. :cool:
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
29,197
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So, who really really cares? Who wakes up in the morning and worries about some bird going extinct? I certainly do not. The world will not end because some bird, fish or wild animal goes extinct. The Saber tooth tiger went extinct a very long time ago and the world still survived. Like humans, all those mentioned above must learn to adapt to the changes going on around them in order to survive or they will die. It's their call and not mine. :cool:
i understand what you mean however if species continue to become extinct it can gradually effect the ecosystem.
 
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Twin_Moose

Hall of Fame Member
Apr 17, 2017
18,068
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Twin Moose Creek
Science dictates life on Earth is through evolution, and the Darwin theory only the strongest survive, because of the changing environment of the planet, why are we not seeing new species evolve from the changing environment of today? Any reports yet of offspring with Carbon filters found in the enlarged lungs?
 
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taxslave

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 25, 2008
34,249
2,771
113
Vancouver Island
Science dictates life on Earth is through evolution, and the Darwin theory only the strongest survive, because of the changing environment of the planet, why are we not seeing new species evolve from the changing environment of today? Any reports yet of offspring with Carbon filters found in the enlarged lungs?
We are seing new species. THe woke generation certainly is not normal people.
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
29,197
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GOLDSTEIN: Emissions soaring as UN climate conference approaches
Author of the article:Lorrie Goldstein
Publishing date:Oct 02, 2021 • 10 hours ago • 3 minute read • 43 Comments
Steam and exhaust rise from different companies on a cold winter day on January 6, 2017 in Oberhausen, Germany.
Steam and exhaust rise from different companies on a cold winter day on January 6, 2017 in Oberhausen, Germany. PHOTO BY LUKAS SCHULZE /Getty Images
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While world leaders, including Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, gear up for yet another major United Nations meeting on climate change in Glasgow, Scotland in November, global greenhouse gas emissions are skyrocketing.

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That’s because as global economies begin to recover from the world-wide recession caused by COVID-19, the use of coal, oil and natural gas to produce energy is rapidly increasing.


This is the reality, and the dilemma, the UN has never confronted.

That is, the only things that have ever dramatically and quickly slowed rising global emissions are global recessions — and then only temporarily — not UN agreements like the Kyoto and Paris climate accords.

Global emissions dropped dramatically in the first half of 2020, as COVID-19 spread around the world, leading to a global recession that shut down or curtailed many industries and thus the need for fossil fuel energy to power them.

But emissions began rising again in the latter half of 2020.

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By the end of this year they are expected to return to almost their pre-pandemic levels and keep rising.

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Global emissions dropped by about 5.6% at the height of the pandemic and will increase by almost 5% by the end of this year.

As the United Nations Environment Program put it last month in preparation for the Glasgow climate summit:

“COVID-19 did not slow the relentless advance of climate change. There is no sign that we are growing back greener, as carbon dioxide emissions are rapidly recovering after a temporary blip, due to the economic slowdown and are nowhere close to reduction targets. Greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere continue at record levels, committing the planet to dangerous future warming.”

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“Throughout the pandemic we have heard that we must build back better to set humanity on a more sustainable path and to avoid the worst impacts of climate change on society and economies” said World Meteorological Organization Secretary-General Petteri Taalas. “So far in 2021 we are not going in the right direction.”

Environment Minister Jonathan Wilkinson recently said the Trudeau government will soon unveil a detailed plan to meet its commitment to the UN to reduce Canada’s emissions to 40-45% below 2005 levels by 2030, on the way to net zero by 2050.

Except for 2020 because of the pandemic, Canada’s emissions have increased slightly since the Trudeau Liberals took power in 2015.


That said, Canada should be in for some praise in Glasgow, given Trudeau’s carbon tax of $40 per tonne of emissions this year, rising to $170 per tonne in 2030, along with other measures that will increase the cost of living for Canadians.

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The problem is while emissions are flattening or falling in the developed world, they are rising in the developing world.

In 2019, China for the first time generated more emissions than the entire developed world combined.

China consumes more coal, the most carbon intensive fossil fuel, than the rest of the world combined.

While per capita emissions are low, China is the world’s largest national emitter of greenhouse gases, responsible for 27% of global emissions. Canada contributes 1.5%.

So yes, now that Canada has a significant carbon tax, Trudeau is in a position to lecture other countries about lowering their emissions linked to human-induced climate change.

The problem is the developing world, led by China, will do whatever it wants to do on this file, as China has on so many others.

lgoldstein@postmedia.com