It's Climate Change I tell'ya!! IT'S CLIMATE CHANGE!!

spaminator

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Conservatives plan to introduce $20-per-tonne carbon price in climate plan
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Publishing date:Apr 15, 2021 • 9 hours ago • 2 minute read • 80 Comments
Conservative Party leader Erin O'Toole responds to the government's fiscal update, the Fall Economic Statement 2020, in the House of Commons, in Ottawa, Nov. 30, 2020.
Conservative Party leader Erin O'Toole responds to the government's fiscal update, the Fall Economic Statement 2020, in the House of Commons, in Ottawa, Nov. 30, 2020. PHOTO BY BLAIR GABLE /REUTERS / FILES
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OTTAWA — Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole is pitching a $20-per-tonne carbon price for consumers in his party’s $5-billion plan to tackle climate change.

The move represents a major policy shift for the party, which has long campaigned to scrap the carbon price introduced by the Liberals under Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.


The 15-page document, obtained by The Canadian Press, is set to be announced by O’Toole later this morning and outlines how carbon pricing would work under the Conservatives.

It says the price would start at $20 per tonne and rise to no higher than $50 per tonne.

The party, which did not immediately respond to requests for comment, says its system would be more affordable than what’s currently in place, and it would work with provinces to create a “Personal Low Carbon Savings Account.”

The plan says Canadians would pay into their account each time they buy hydrocarbon-based fuel, and then use that money to pay for products to help them live a “greener life,” like a bike or bus pass.

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It says the accounts would be managed by companies similar to how a debit-card system works.

“Even at this lower carbon price, we will ensure that this does not place an excessive burden on low-income Canadians and will protect farmers by ensuring that they have affordable options,” the plan reads.


The Liberal plan — applicable only in provinces that do not have their own carbon pricing scheme — sets the price at $40 per tonne, rising each year until it reaches $170 per tonne by 2030.

The federal government’s plan could raise prices at the pump by nearly 28 per cent over a decade, officials said in December.

The Conservative plan also aims to “go big” on zero-emissions vehicles by requiring 30 per cent of light-duty vehicles — cars, SUVs, pickup trucks — sold to be pollutant-free by 2030.

Other planks include proposing lower North America-wide industrial emissions standards to the Biden administration in the U.S., improving fuel regulations to make burning gasoline cleaner and investing $3 billion over 10 years in “natural climate solutions” that focus on forests, farming and wetlands.

A tax credit to incentivize use of carbon-capture technology also factors in.


“While electric vehicles are quickly growing in popularity, the truth is that the world will still be burning oil and gas for decades to come,” states the Conservative plan, dubbed “Secure the Environment.”

In December, the Liberal government released a $15-billion plan to meet its climate change commitments that includes steady increases to the carbon tax.

It also pledges money to encourage heavy industry to reduce its emissions, for communities to make buildings more energy efficient and for remote communities to get off diesel-generated power.

The aim is a 32 per cent reduction in emissions by 2030, slightly more than Canada’s 30 per cent Paris agreement commitment. Ottawa hopes to reach 40 per cent reductions when provincial programs are layered on.
 

spaminator

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LILLEY: O'Toole's carbon tax plan a gift to Trudeau and Western separatists
Instead of the Trudeau government taxing you and giving you some of the money back, the Conservative plan taxes you and gives you Erin Bucks to spend on things that they like

Author of the article:Brian Lilley
Publishing date:Apr 15, 2021 • 4 hours ago • 3 minute read • 22 Comments
Conservative Party leader Erin O'Toole speaks during Question Period in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Tuesday, March 23, 2021.
Conservative Party leader Erin O'Toole speaks during Question Period in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Tuesday, March 23, 2021. PHOTO BY BLAIR GABLE /REUTERS
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It was just last Saturday that I was interviewing Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole and asking him about his position on the carbon tax.

O’Toole had been accused of flirting with the idea, of not being clear, so when I was putting questions to him at the Canada Strong and Free Networking Conference I asked for clarity.


“Would your plan have a consumer carbon tax? Would you have an industrial emitter fee, which is essentially a carbon tax by another name? What is your plan on this?” I asked O’Toole.

“I’ve always opposed Mr. Trudeau’s approach on the carbon tax and the way that he has misled people,” O’Toole said. “We’re going to end Mr. Trudeau’s carbon tax.”

What O’Toole never said was that he would bring in his own tax. Talk about misleading people!

As his answer meandered around the issue, he spoke about the Trudeau carbon tax being a revenue grab, something that would hurt consumers and businesses but never once did he say, imply, or hint that later that week he would introduce his own plan for a consumer carbon tax complete with a forced savings plan to get your money back and talk of additional taxes on cottages, flights, vehicles and more.

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Yes, you read that right, the Conservatives are considering more than just a carbon tax to fight climate change — they want to tax your cottage and your vacation in Mexico.

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Prime Minister Justin Trudeau walks to a news conference, as efforts continue to help slow the spread of the coronavirus disease in Ottawa, April 13, 2021.
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In this multiple-exposed image, Conservative Leader Erin O'Toole, left, asks a question and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau answers during question period on Nov. 4, 2020.
BONOKOSKI: Trudeau still more electable than O'Toole? Incomprehensible!

Don’t call it a carbon tax though, the O’Toole Conservatives call this a price on carbon. I mean, why not, it works for Trudeau. The plan specifically says they won’t tax Canadians while talking about how they will tax Canadians.

“Canada’s Conservatives will meet our Paris climate commitment and reduce emissions by 2030, but without the government taxing working Canadians and driving jobs and investment out of the country,” the plan states.

That is nothing if not disingenuous.

The O’Toole plan would see the carbon tax on consumers start at $20 a tonne, lower than the current rate of $40, but eventually rising to $50 a tonne. Not to worry though, you would get all that money back, if you spent it on the right things.

Unlike the Trudeau carbon tax where you get a rebate on some of what you spend, under the Conservative plan you will get money deposited into a “Personal Low Carbon Savings Account.” You can then spend that money to buy environmentally friendly products like a bicycle or bamboo straws.

Now instead of the government taxing you and giving you some of the money back, the Conservative plan taxes you and gives you Erin Bucks to spend on things that they like.

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Politically, this is a disaster for O’Toole. He won’t win over anyone who views climate change as their top issue and will drive away lots of other voters, including swing voters with cottages – or a brain – and he will alienate Western Canada.


Jay Hill is a former Conservative cabinet minister, now interim leader of the Western separatist Maverick Party, and in my view the big winner from O’Toole’s announcement. Hill tells me he’s been inundated with calls and messages since O’Toole announced his plan.

Next election, I wouldn’t be surprised to see many Western Conservatives replaced by Maverick MPs.

“The mandate of any Maverick MP elected will be very simple,” Hill tells me. “If it’s good for Western Canada, Maverick MPs would vote for it and if it’s not, they won’t.”

He said his new party will function like the Bloc Quebecois in looking out for Western Canada, an area where a carbon tax will never be popular.

O’Toole had a chance at winning the next election, even if it was an uphill battle. Now, I don’t see how that happens. His climate plan will be mocked by the Liberals, hated by his base and give rise to another protest party.

Justin Trudeau’s smile just got wider.

blilley@postmedia.com
 

spaminator

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Not another day at the office for Estonian MP caught vaping in bed
One-time punk rock musician Tarmo Kruusimäe looked seriously laid back during a remote Parliamentary debate on climate change

Author of the article:postmedia News
Publishing date:Apr 16, 2021 • 19 hours ago • 1 minute read • Join the conversation
Estonian MP Tarmo Kruusimäe is seen vaping in bed during a remote parliamentary meeting.
Estonian MP Tarmo Kruusimäe is seen vaping in bed during a remote parliamentary meeting. PHOTO BY SCREENGRAB /Twitter
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The Zoom-appropriate struggles are real.

The latest person to be caught in a non-professional way on Zoom is Estonian MP Tarmo Kruusimäe during a remote Parliamentary debate on climate change according to Estonian World.


The politician, from the centre-right Isamaa party, was shown vaping in bed and listening to music when the live feed went to him for a question.

Kruusimäe says he was unaware it was his turn to speak in the debate and that everyone could see him but told local Celebrity magazine Kroonika: “This is the charm and pain of remote work.”

The MP, who was in a number of punk rock bands before getting into politics, said if he had known he would have worn a dress shirt and had a different background.

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He joins others in struggling to adjust to remote working conditions.

In February, Texas lawyer Rod Ponton left a kitten filter on during a video conference call with a judge and was unable to turn it off announcing: “I am not a cat!”

And a Vicar in Warwick, England livestreamed a Easter church service with a Blues Brothers filter of a fedora and sunglasses on his face, but Reverend Vaughan Roberts joked after: “At least it wasn’t Rambo or the Godfather.”
 

spaminator

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BUDGET: Liberals spend billions on clean technology
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Stephanie Taylor
Publishing date:Apr 19, 2021 • 17 hours ago • 3 minute read • 7 Comments
Smokestacks billow at an incineration plant near Paris, France, Dec. 18, 2019.
Smokestacks billow at an incineration plant near Paris, France, Dec. 18, 2019. PHOTO BY CHARLES PLATIAU /REUTERS / FILES
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OTTAWA — Pushing the private sector to develop clean technology — and heavy emitters to adopt it — is where billions in new money will flow from the Liberals’ 2021 budget pledge to tackle climate change.

Around $17 billion is promised to be spent in the years ahead to promote a “green” recovery out of the COVID-19 pandemic and create jobs.


Included in that is $5 billion more into a fund meant to be spent on projects used by industry to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions.

The government says that will be spread out over seven years and is on top of the $3 billion announced when the Liberals unveiled their plan reach to net-zero emissions by 2050.


Another measure targeting heavy emitters is a new tax incentive to encourage companies to adopt technology that traps carbon dioxide into the ground from fuel combustion instead of seeing it released into the atmosphere.

The government says it will soon begin consultations on designing a tax credit for capital spent on carbon capture and storage technology in hopes of increasing how many million tonnes Canada traps annually.

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Making the country a hub for clean technology is among the priorities Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has outlined in his approach to climate. The Liberals also want to adopt policies that make Canada go over and above its international commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 30 per cent below 2005 levels.

A political scientist who focuses on budget polices and public finances says the new spending plan fails to offer solutions to the pressures facing Ottawa, like how to reconcile the environment with the economy.


“I don’t see a big ambitious program that will lead us to zero emissions with strict targets,” said Genevieve Tellier of the University of Ottawa.

She added a lot of the new climate spending comes in form of grants, so it’s being left up to private businesses to come to government with ideas.

“It’s not a very aggressive, proactive environmental budget.”

Tellier says there’s not much for Saskatchewan and Alberta by way of providing a road map or more support for transitioning away from fossil fuels.

She also suggests the budget is not likely to woo potential voters who want to see more action on climate change if the minority Parliament heads into an election.


Overall, Tellier says climate change has taken a back seat to recovering the economy from the pandemic, although the government has placed a green lens on programs like housing.

Building off of what was promised in fall economic statement and in hopes of reducing people’s energy bills, Ottawa promised to send around $4 billion over five years to the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp. to offer interest-free loans of up to $40,000 for households to do green retrofits.

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Other climate initiatives include a 50 per cent 10-year reduction on corporate and small business income tax rates for companies manufacturing zero-emissions technologies, such as solar panels and electric buses.

It will also establish the first federal green bond with an issuance target of $5 billion. The goal is to attract investors to finance ways to fight climate change, like through green infrastructure.

Getting more electric vehicles on the road is a priority for the Liberals under its net-zero emissions plan and the budget promises $56 million over five years to work with countries like the United States on bringing in standards for zero-emission vehicle charging and refuelling stations.

Although the government says reducing emissions will help all Canadians, a gender-based analysis in the budget says men will likely benefit from growth in the clean energy sector because they make up most of its workforce, same with the new climate spending on science and research.

It also says employees in manufacturing tend to be men, and those who are middle-aged high-income earners have been the early adopters of zero-emission vehicles, according to data.

Monday’s budget also promises $2.3 billion in funding to federal departments like Parks Canada and Fisheries and Oceans to conserve up to one million square kilometres more land and inland waters to meet the country’s 2025 conservation targets
 

spaminator

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GOLDSTEIN: Trudeau's carbon tax, global emissions keep rising
Author of the article:Lorrie Goldstein
Publishing date:Apr 24, 2021 • 4 hours ago • 3 minute read • 10 Comments
Canadian PM Justin Trudeau, right, speaks during the virtual Leaders Summit on Climate in a video screenshot on Thursday, April 22, 2021.
Canadian PM Justin Trudeau, right, speaks during the virtual Leaders Summit on Climate in a video screenshot on Thursday, April 22, 2021. PHOTO BY WHITE HOUSE /Bloomberg
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While Prime Minister Justin Trudeau raised carbon taxes April 1 and pledged deeper cuts to Canada’s greenhouse gas emissions at a virtual climate change summit convened by U.S. President Joe Biden last week, global emissions are projected to skyrocket this year.

Emissions briefly declined in 2020 to 31.5 billion tonnes from 2019’s record high of 33.4 billion tonnes, because of the world-wide recession caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

But the International Energy Agency in its “Global Energy Review, 2021” predicts they will increase to 33 billion tonnes this year as the global economy starts to recover, increasing emissions to their second-highest level in history, led by China’s insatiable demand for coal power.

In fact, most of the increase will come from the developing world, led by China, the world’s largest emitter and the only country where energy demand and economic output increased last year.

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A major reason will be a 4.5% increase in the global use of coal — the dirtiest fossil fuel — to produce electricity, with China alone accounting for over 50% of that growth.

While China is building hundreds of coal-fired power plants domestically and internationally, a recent report by TransitionZero, a financial analytics company, says it will have to replace almost 600 of them with renewable electricity generation within the next decade, if China and the world are to meet their emission reduction targets.

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Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's carbon tax is not revenue neutral as his government originally claimed, writes Lorrie Goldstein.
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This points to several inescapable realities about global energy use and climate change, unaffected by Trudeau’s unmet promises.

First, the only things that have ever dramatically and quickly reduced global emissions are global recessions.

The last one before the COVID-19 pandemic occurred in 2008-09 because of the global financial collapse that started with massive fraud in the U.S. subprime mortgage derivatives market.

Second, as countries recover from global recessions, their emissions inevitably rise because of increased economic activity.

Third, Trudeau’s latest pledge to cut Canada’s emissions by up to 45% below 2005 levels by 2030 — having already failed to meet his 2020 target of 17% below 2005 levels — is absurd.

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Canada’s emissions in 2005 were 739 million tonnes.

Or at least that’s the latest government figure for 2005. Last year it was 730 million tonnes.

A 45% cut to 739 million tonnes means Trudeau’s 2030 target is 406 million tonnes.


Based on our current emissions of 730 tonnes (for 2019, the most recent government figures available) that will require a 324-million tonne reduction by 2030.

That would mean eliminating the equivalent of Canada’s entire oil & gas (191 million tonnes), agriculture (73 million tonnes) and electricity sectors (61 million tonnes) — totalling 325 million tonnes — in less than 10 years.

That’s absurd. No Canadian government, Liberal or Conservative, has met a single emission target it has set in three decades.

When Trudeau came into power in 2015, Canada’s annual emissions were 723 million tonnes. Today, they’re seven million tonnes higher.

Canadians are paying a high price for Trudeau’s failures — $60 billion for “climate action and clean growth” from 2015 to 2019, and another $53.6 billion for “Canada’s green recovery” since October 2020, according to the PM’s own statement at the Biden summit.

Finally, no matter how much Canadians pay in carbon taxes (currently $40 per tonne of emissions rising to $170 per tonne in 2030), nothing we do matters because Canada is responsible for less than 2% of energy-related global emissions.

China alone is responsible for more than 28%.

lgoldstein@postmedia.com
 

Twin_Moose

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Scientist who served in Obama admin pushes back against prevailing climate change narrative

"Most of the disconnect comes from the long game of telephone that starts with the research literature and runs through the assessment reports to the summaries of the assessment reports and on to the media coverage," Koonin wrote.

"For example, both research literature and government reports state clearly that heat waves in the US are now no more common than they were in 1900, and that the warmest temperatures in the US have not risen in the past fifty years," he wrote.
Koonin noted that Greenland's ice sheet is not decreasing any faster now than it was eight decades ago.

He said that most individuals receive information that has already passed through several layers of filtering.

"Most of the disconnect comes from the long game of telephone that starts with the research literature and runs through the assessment reports to the summaries of the assessment reports and on to the media coverage. There are abundant opportunities to get things wrong — both accidentally and on purpose — as the information goes through filter after filter to be packaged for various audiences," Koonin wrote. He said that "most people don't get the whole story."....Read the link
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
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Big oil is doing a kick ass job at feeding the myth and raking in subsides to take control of all the energy without spending on long distance transmission lines. Just get assholes to fund it on their roofs and then buy power at half price which is in turn sold back at a higher than normal "green rates" to the dumb assholes at night.
 
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spaminator

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Ottawa pushes back on Ontario, Prairies crying no consultation on 2030 emissions goal
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Stephanie Taylor
Publishing date:Apr 26, 2021 • 12 hours ago • 3 minute read • 52 Comments
U.S. President Joe Biden and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, appearing via video conference call, give closing remarks at the end of their virtual bilateral meeting from the White House in Washington, D.C., Feb. 23, 2021.
U.S. President Joe Biden and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, appearing via video conference call, give closing remarks at the end of their virtual bilateral meeting from the White House in Washington, D.C., Feb. 23, 2021. PHOTO BY JONATHAN ERNST /REUTERS
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OTTAWA — The Prairies and Ontario say they weren’t consulted about Canada’s higher target to cut greenhouse gas pollution, while other provinces welcome the federal government’s new goal for 2030.

The division is a sign policies around tacking climate change remain a source of friction in some federal-provincial relations as Ottawa pushes the country toward net zero by 2050, but rejects there has been any lack of communication.


Prime Minister Justin Trudeau pledged at a recent global leaders summit to reduce emissions of these heat-trapping gases by 40 to 45 per cent below 2005 levels by the end of the decade.

That’s between four to nine per cent higher than the 36 per cent the Liberal government says it can achieve under existing measures, which is already above the 30 per cent target committed to under the Paris Agreement.

Under the international contract, countries are asked to continue to submit national greenhouse gas reduction targets that are each supposed to be more ambitious than the last.

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Environment and Climate Change Minister Jonathan Wilkinson had asked opposition party leaders to provide their thoughts on what the new target should be before Trudeau’s unveiling of the new goal.

His office said he also called his provincial and territorial counterparts over the winter to discuss the issue, asked for their opinions through a letter in early March, as well as booked some follow-up meetings.

Yet environment ministers in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Ontario said they were not consulted.

In a statement, Alberta Environment Minister Jason Nixon said the government had a chance “to share its climate priorities” with Ottawa before last week’s summit.

“However, we were not consulted about, nor made aware of the details of the Prime Minister’s new emissions reductions target,” he said.


Andrew Buttigieg, a media relations manager and assistant to Ontario Environment Minister Jeff Yurek, said federal ambition relies on the provinces.

Ontario, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Alberta have long been opposed to the federal Liberals’ approach to energy and climate policies, most notably around its charging of a federal carbon price on consumer goods.

A court battle over that move was finally put to rest after the Supreme Court of Canada ruled Ottawa’s backstop was constitutional.

Saskatchewan Environment Minister Warren Kaeding said the new target of up to 45 per cent fewer emissions was “concerning” because of how that ambition may affect the competitiveness of its trade-dependent industries, like agriculture, potash and oil and gas.

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He said the Saskatchewan Party government was “surprised” at the new figure and also expressed disappointment after hearing the federal government had inked a new goal of 36 per cent into its recent budget.

“They indicated they were going up, but there was really no fixed number that they were going to provide us.”


Manitoba Conservation and Climate Minister Sarah Guillemard said in a statement the province wasn’t consulted “even as the heavy lifting needed to achieve real and measurable GHG emissions reductions falls on the provinces and territories.”

In the Liberals’ most recent climate plan released last December, it said “collaboration and engagement with provinces and territories will continue leading up to the announcement of an updated nationally determined contribution (NDC),” which is what the national greenhouse gas reduction targets are called.

Although some provinces said they weren’t consulted, others including British Columbia welcomed the higher target.A spokeswoman from Nova Scotia’s department of environment and climate change said it’s always talking to Ottawa about reducing emissions, which it supports.

“With Nova Scotia’s target of 53 per cent below 2005 levels by 2030, we will help Canada reach its commitment,” said spokeswoman Barbara MacLean.

Prince Edward Island’s minister of environment, energy and climate action also welcomed the higher targets.

“With the federal goal now closer to our provincial goal, we are hopeful that this will increase funding available to us to reach these ambitious targets,” Steven Myers said in a statement.

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Canada’s new goal is less ambitious than that of the U.S., which promised to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least 50 per cent by 2030.

David Layzell, a director at the Canadian Energy Systems Analysis Research Initiative, said cutting more emissions within the next decade will be tough without provincial co-operation, as the task crosses multiple sectors.

For example, the University of Calgary professor said, electricity generation is up to provinces. Ottawa has pushed for a phaseout of coal, but other challenges exist around transportation and agriculture.

Layzell said promoting new chances for economic growth would help incentivize co-operation to further a clean transition.

“That’s really the trick, is to make this not really taking medicine.”
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
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The bullshit keeps getting thicker and a massive insult to the intelligence of anyone with at least a 2 digit IQ.


Antarctic polar bears are having a tough go it? There aren't any Antarctic polar bears. Ecosystem sustaining Amazon delta grassfires are going to turn the rainforest into a savanna in 20 years? Anyone brighter than a 1 watt eco light bulb knowns savanna requires heavy grazing and is far more diverse ecosystem that absorbs far more carbon than rainforest

Sweet. I've always dreamed of grain farming in S. America during our bitter cold winters. Living life in perpetual spring and summer would be amazing. There is a fortune to be made feeding the grazers in the winter months.

I'm going to celebrate this with a nice Argentine wine and a can of Brazilian corn beef.
 
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Dixie Cup

House Member
Sep 16, 2006
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It doesn't matter how high world wide emissions go as long as Western Canada is forced into a depression.
The bullshit keeps getting thicker and a massive insult to the intelligence of anyone with at least a 2 digit IQ.


Antarctic polar bears are having a tough go it? Ecosystem sustaining Amazon delta grassfires are going to turn the Rainforest into a Savanah in 20 years?

Sweet. I've always dreamed of grain farming in S. America during our bitter cold winters. Living life in perpetual spring and summer would be amazing.

I'm going to celebrate this with a nice Argentine wine and a can of Brazilian corn beef.
Factually, the polar bears are doing just fine - total propaganda being spewed by those who don't have a clue.