It's Climate Change I tell'ya!! IT'S CLIMATE CHANGE!!

spaminator

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Red hot October almost guarantees 2023 will be the hottest year on record
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Melina Walling
Published Nov 08, 2023 • 2 minute read

This October was the hottest on record globally, 1.7 degrees Celsius warmer than the pre-industrial average for the month — and the fifth straight month with such a mark in what will now almost certainly be the warmest year ever recorded.


October was a whopping 0.4 degrees Celsius warmer than the previous record for the month in 2019, surprising even Samantha Burgess, deputy director of the Copernicus Climate Change Service, the European climate agency that routinely publishes monthly bulletins observing global surface air and sea temperatures, among other data.


“The amount that we’re smashing records by is shocking,” Burgess said.

After the cumulative warming of these past several months, it’s virtually guaranteed that 2023 will be the hottest year on record, according to Copernicus.

Scientists monitor climate variables to gain an understanding of how our planet is evolving as a result of human-generated greenhouse gas emissions. A warmer planet means more extreme and intense weather events like severe drought or hurricanes that hold more water, said Peter Schlosser, vice president and vice provost of the Global Futures Laboratory at Arizona State University. He is not involved with Copernicus.


“This is a clear sign that we are going into a climate regime that will have more impact on more people,” Schlosser said. “We better take this warning that we actually should have taken 50 years ago or more and draw the right conclusions.”

This year has been so exceptionally hot in part because oceans have been warming, which means they are doing less to counteract global warming than in the past. Historically, the ocean has absorbed as much as 90% of the excess heat from climate change, Burgess said. And in the midst of an El Nino, a natural climate cycle that temporarily warms parts of the ocean and drives weather changes around the world, more warming can be expected in the coming months, she added.

Schlosser said that means the world should expect more records to be broken as a result of that warming, but the question is whether they will come in smaller steps going forward. He added that the planet is already exceeding the 1.5 degrees Celsius of warming since pre-industrial times that the Paris agreement was aimed at capping, and that the planet hasn’t yet seen the full impact of that warming. Now, he, Burgess and other scientists say, the need for action — to stop planet-warming emissions — is urgent.

“It’s so much more expensive to keep burning these fossil fuels than it would be to stop doing it. That’s basically what it shows,” said Friederike Otto, a climate scientist at Imperial College London. “And of course, you don’t see that when you just look at the records being broken and not at the people and systems that are suffering, but that — that is what matters.”

— AP Science Writer Seth Borenstein contributed to this report from Washington.
 
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petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
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Low Earth Orbit
Red hot October almost guarantees 2023 will be the hottest year on record
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Melina Walling
Published Nov 08, 2023 • 2 minute read

This October was the hottest on record globally, 1.7 degrees Celsius warmer than the pre-industrial average for the month — and the fifth straight month with such a mark in what will now almost certainly be the warmest year ever recorded.


October was a whopping 0.4 degrees Celsius warmer than the previous record for the month in 2019, surprising even Samantha Burgess, deputy director of the Copernicus Climate Change Service, the European climate agency that routinely publishes monthly bulletins observing global surface air and sea temperatures, among other data.


“The amount that we’re smashing records by is shocking,” Burgess said.

After the cumulative warming of these past several months, it’s virtually guaranteed that 2023 will be the hottest year on record, according to Copernicus.

Scientists monitor climate variables to gain an understanding of how our planet is evolving as a result of human-generated greenhouse gas emissions. A warmer planet means more extreme and intense weather events like severe drought or hurricanes that hold more water, said Peter Schlosser, vice president and vice provost of the Global Futures Laboratory at Arizona State University. He is not involved with Copernicus.


“This is a clear sign that we are going into a climate regime that will have more impact on more people,” Schlosser said. “We better take this warning that we actually should have taken 50 years ago or more and draw the right conclusions.”

This year has been so exceptionally hot in part because oceans have been warming, which means they are doing less to counteract global warming than in the past. Historically, the ocean has absorbed as much as 90% of the excess heat from climate change, Burgess said. And in the midst of an El Nino, a natural climate cycle that temporarily warms parts of the ocean and drives weather changes around the world, more warming can be expected in the coming months, she added.

Schlosser said that means the world should expect more records to be broken as a result of that warming, but the question is whether they will come in smaller steps going forward. He added that the planet is already exceeding the 1.5 degrees Celsius of warming since pre-industrial times that the Paris agreement was aimed at capping, and that the planet hasn’t yet seen the full impact of that warming. Now, he, Burgess and other scientists say, the need for action — to stop planet-warming emissions — is urgent.

“It’s so much more expensive to keep burning these fossil fuels than it would be to stop doing it. That’s basically what it shows,” said Friederike Otto, a climate scientist at Imperial College London. “And of course, you don’t see that when you just look at the records being broken and not at the people and systems that are suffering, but that — that is what matters.”

— AP Science Writer Seth Borenstein contributed to this report from Washington.
Right here is the "scientific out": And in the midst of an El Nino, a natural climate cycle that temporarily warms parts of the ocean".

PS. It's not a climate cycle, it's a geophysical cycle. Anything climate is a minimum of 30 years.

El Niño and La Niña events occur every two to seven years, on average,
 

Walter

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Taxslave2

House Member
Aug 13, 2022
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Red hot October almost guarantees 2023 will be the hottest year on record
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Melina Walling
Published Nov 08, 2023 • 2 minute read

This October was the hottest on record globally, 1.7 degrees Celsius warmer than the pre-industrial average for the month — and the fifth straight month with such a mark in what will now almost certainly be the warmest year ever recorded.


October was a whopping 0.4 degrees Celsius warmer than the previous record for the month in 2019, surprising even Samantha Burgess, deputy director of the Copernicus Climate Change Service, the European climate agency that routinely publishes monthly bulletins observing global surface air and sea temperatures, among other data.


“The amount that we’re smashing records by is shocking,” Burgess said.

After the cumulative warming of these past several months, it’s virtually guaranteed that 2023 will be the hottest year on record, according to Copernicus.

Scientists monitor climate variables to gain an understanding of how our planet is evolving as a result of human-generated greenhouse gas emissions. A warmer planet means more extreme and intense weather events like severe drought or hurricanes that hold more water, said Peter Schlosser, vice president and vice provost of the Global Futures Laboratory at Arizona State University. He is not involved with Copernicus.


“This is a clear sign that we are going into a climate regime that will have more impact on more people,” Schlosser said. “We better take this warning that we actually should have taken 50 years ago or more and draw the right conclusions.”

This year has been so exceptionally hot in part because oceans have been warming, which means they are doing less to counteract global warming than in the past. Historically, the ocean has absorbed as much as 90% of the excess heat from climate change, Burgess said. And in the midst of an El Nino, a natural climate cycle that temporarily warms parts of the ocean and drives weather changes around the world, more warming can be expected in the coming months, she added.

Schlosser said that means the world should expect more records to be broken as a result of that warming, but the question is whether they will come in smaller steps going forward. He added that the planet is already exceeding the 1.5 degrees Celsius of warming since pre-industrial times that the Paris agreement was aimed at capping, and that the planet hasn’t yet seen the full impact of that warming. Now, he, Burgess and other scientists say, the need for action — to stop planet-warming emissions — is urgent.

“It’s so much more expensive to keep burning these fossil fuels than it would be to stop doing it. That’s basically what it shows,” said Friederike Otto, a climate scientist at Imperial College London. “And of course, you don’t see that when you just look at the records being broken and not at the people and systems that are suffering, but that — that is what matters.”

— AP Science Writer Seth Borenstein contributed to this report from Washington.
Must be why we had frost on the west coast before Halloween. These truthers like to cherry-pick their data.
 
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Dixie Cup

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Sep 16, 2006
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Plant-based meat, milk alternatives could cut emissions nearly a third: Study
Author of the article:postmedia News
Published Oct 22, 2023 • Last updated 1 day ago • 1 minute read

Are you ready to sink your teeth into more plant-based burgers to help the environment?


According to a new study, cutting the world’s consumption of pork, chicken, beef and milk products by half could help reduce global greenhouse gas emissions 31% by 2050.


The study, published in the journal Nature Communications last month, also suggests the change in diet would virtually halt the loss of forests for farm use.

Currently, food sourced from animals accounts for less than 20% of the global food energy supply, but “are responsible for the majority of negative impacts on land use, water use, biodiversity, and greenhouse gas emissions in global food systems,” the study’s authors note.

Farming cattle involves cutting down forests to plant grain to feed them, which produces methane, a far worse greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide.


“Methane has more than 80 times the warming power of carbon dioxide over the first 20 years after it reaches the atmosphere,” according to the Environmental Defense Fund. “Even though CO2 has a longer-lasting effect, methane sets the pace for warming in the near term.”

If consuming animal products is cut in half by mid-century, land used for agriculture would also decrease 12% instead of continuing to expand as the world’s population grows. Nitrogen used in farming would decrease as well, along with a 10% reduction in water use.

Researchers said the effects of increasing plant-based food in global diets would leave fewer people hungry, estimating 31 million more would be better fed by 2050.

The study noted interest in plant-based products has been increasing in recent years.

“Despite their novelty, as of 2020 they have already gained popularity, with plant-based alternatives accounting for 15% of the milk market in the U.S. and 1.4% and 1.3% of the meat markets in the U.S. and Germany, respectively,” the authors wrote.
No!
 

Dixie Cup

Senate Member
Sep 16, 2006
5,825
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Edmonton
Red hot October almost guarantees 2023 will be the hottest year on record
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Melina Walling
Published Nov 08, 2023 • 2 minute read

This October was the hottest on record globally, 1.7 degrees Celsius warmer than the pre-industrial average for the month — and the fifth straight month with such a mark in what will now almost certainly be the warmest year ever recorded.


October was a whopping 0.4 degrees Celsius warmer than the previous record for the month in 2019, surprising even Samantha Burgess, deputy director of the Copernicus Climate Change Service, the European climate agency that routinely publishes monthly bulletins observing global surface air and sea temperatures, among other data.


“The amount that we’re smashing records by is shocking,” Burgess said.

After the cumulative warming of these past several months, it’s virtually guaranteed that 2023 will be the hottest year on record, according to Copernicus.

Scientists monitor climate variables to gain an understanding of how our planet is evolving as a result of human-generated greenhouse gas emissions. A warmer planet means more extreme and intense weather events like severe drought or hurricanes that hold more water, said Peter Schlosser, vice president and vice provost of the Global Futures Laboratory at Arizona State University. He is not involved with Copernicus.


“This is a clear sign that we are going into a climate regime that will have more impact on more people,” Schlosser said. “We better take this warning that we actually should have taken 50 years ago or more and draw the right conclusions.”

This year has been so exceptionally hot in part because oceans have been warming, which means they are doing less to counteract global warming than in the past. Historically, the ocean has absorbed as much as 90% of the excess heat from climate change, Burgess said. And in the midst of an El Nino, a natural climate cycle that temporarily warms parts of the ocean and drives weather changes around the world, more warming can be expected in the coming months, she added.

Schlosser said that means the world should expect more records to be broken as a result of that warming, but the question is whether they will come in smaller steps going forward. He added that the planet is already exceeding the 1.5 degrees Celsius of warming since pre-industrial times that the Paris agreement was aimed at capping, and that the planet hasn’t yet seen the full impact of that warming. Now, he, Burgess and other scientists say, the need for action — to stop planet-warming emissions — is urgent.

“It’s so much more expensive to keep burning these fossil fuels than it would be to stop doing it. That’s basically what it shows,” said Friederike Otto, a climate scientist at Imperial College London. “And of course, you don’t see that when you just look at the records being broken and not at the people and systems that are suffering, but that — that is what matters.”

— AP Science Writer Seth Borenstein contributed to this report from Washington.
OMG The climate is changing like it always does. 😳
 
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