It's Climate Change I tell'ya!! IT'S CLIMATE CHANGE!!

spaminator

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Fires scorch Spain and France, where flames reach the beach
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Angela Charlton And Joseph Wilson
Publishing date:Jul 17, 2022 • 15 hours ago • 4 minute read • Join the conversation

PARIS (AP) — Firefighters battled wildfires raging out of control in Spain and France, including one whose flames reached two popular Atlantic beaches on Sunday, as Europe wilted under an unusually extreme heat wave.


So far, there have been no fire-related deaths in France or Spain, but authorities in Madrid have blamed soaring temperatures for hundreds of deaths. And two huge blazes, which have consumed pine forests for six days in southwestern France, have forced the evacuation of some 16,200 people.

In dramatic images posted online, a wall of black smoke could be seen rolling toward the Atlantic on a stretch of Bordeaux’s coast that is prized by surfers from around the world. Flames raced across trees abutting a broad sandy beach, as planes flew low to suck up water from the ocean. Elsewhere, smoke blanketed the skyline above a mass of singed trees in images shared by French firefighters.

In Spain, firefighters supported by military brigades tried to stamp out over 30 fires consuming forests spread across the country. Spain’s National Defence Department said that “the majority” of its fire-fighting aircraft have been deployed to reach the blazes, many of which are in rugged, hilly terrain that is difficult for ground crews to access.


Fire season has hit parts of Europe earlier than usual this year after a dry, hot spring that the European Union has attributed to climate change. Some countries are also experiencing extended droughts, while many are sweltering in heat waves.

In Spain’s second heat wave of the summer, many areas have repeatedly seen peaks of 43 degrees Celsius (109 degrees Fahrenheit). According to Spain’s Carlos III Institute, which records temperature-related fatalities daily, 360 deaths were attributed to high temperatures from July 10 to 15. That was compared with 27 temperature-related deaths the previous six days.

Almost all of Spain was under alert for high temperatures for another day Sunday, while there were heat wave warnings for about half of France, where scorching temperatures were expected to climb higher on Monday. The French government has stepped up efforts to protect people in nursing homes, the homeless and other vulnerable populations after a vicious heat wave and poor planning led to nearly 15,000 deaths in 2003, especially among the elderly.


The fire in La Teste-de-Buch has forced more than 10,000 people to flee at a time when many typically flock to the nearby Atlantic coast area for vacation. French authorities have closed several spots to the public along that coast because of the fire, including La Lagune and Petit Nice beaches that the fire reached on Sunday, and Europe’s tallest sand dune, the Dune du Pilat.

The Gironde regional government said Sunday afternoon that “the situation remains very unfavourable” due to gusting winds that helped fan more flare-ups overnight.

A second fire near the town of Landiras has forced authorities to evacuate 4,100 people this week. Authorities said that one flank has been brought under control by the dumping of white sand along a 2 km (1.2-mile) stretch. Another flank, however, remains unchecked.


People who were forced to flee shared worries about their abandoned homes with local media, and local officials organized special trips for some to fetch pets they had left behind in the rush to get to safety.

Overall, more than 100 square km (40 square miles) of land have burned in the two fires.

Emergency officials warned that high temperatures and winds Sunday and Monday would complicate efforts to stop the fires from spreading further.

“We have to stay very prudent and very humble, because the day will be very hot. We have no favourable weather window,” regional fire official Eric Florensan said Sunday on radio France-Bleu.

Some of the most worrisome blazes in Spain are concentrated in the western regions of Extremadura and Castilla y Leon. Images of plumes of dark smoke rising above wooded hills that have been baked under the sun have become common in several scarcely populated rural areas.


Drought conditions in the Iberian Peninsula have made it particularly susceptible to wildfires. Since last October, Spain has accumulated 25% less rainfall than is considered normal — and some areas have received as much as 75% less than normal, the National Security Department said.

While some fires have been caused by lightning strikes and others the result of human negligence, a blaze that broke out in a nature reserve in Extremadura called La Garganta de los Infiernos, or “The Throat of Hell,” was suspected to be the result of arson, regional authorities said.

Firefighters have been unable to stop the advance of a fire that broke out near the city of Caceres that is threatening the Monfrague National Park and has kept 200 people from returning to their homes. Another fire in southern Spain near the city of Malaga has forced the evacuation of a further 2,500 people.


The office of Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez announced that he will travel to Extremadura to visit some of the hardest-hit areas on Monday.

Hungary, Croatia and the Greek island of Crete have also fought wildfires this week, as have Morocco and California. Italy is in the midst of an early summer heat wave, coupled with the worst drought in its north in 70 years — conditions linked to a recent disaster, when a huge chunk of the Marmolada glacier broke loose, killing several hikers.

Scorching temperatures have even reached northern Europe. An annual four-day walking event in the Dutch city of Nijmegen announced Sunday that it would cancel the first day, scheduled for Tuesday, when temperatures are expected to peak at around 39 degrees Celsius (102 degrees Fahrenheit).

Britain’s weather agency has issued its first-ever “red warning” of extreme heat for Monday and Tuesday, when temperatures in southern England may reach 40 C (104 F) for the first time.

College of Paramedics Chief Executive Tracy Nicholls warned Sunday that the “ferocious heat” could “ultimately, end in people’s deaths.”

— Wilson reported from Barcelona, Spain. Associated Press writer Mike Corder contributed from The Hague, Netherlands.
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
17,609
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Regina, Saskatchewan
That's a dangerous amount of time to spend in hostile territory. The Lieberal runs the risk of hearing from the people and returning to reality from the Lieberal cloud. Must be avoided.
“Due to VIA Rail’s continued reduced capacity on their rail lines due to COVID as well as train car maintenance, logistically, it was not feasible to conduct a meaningful tour this year in all parts of the country,” Guilbeault’s office told the Post. (????)

Why would they do that? COVID or no COVID, train car maintenance or no train car maintenance, you cannot take a train to all parts of the country. You can’t take it to, from or in Newfoundland and Prince Edward Island — not since the late 1960s. Except for a tourist excursion train between Whitehorse and Skagway, Alaska, you can’t take it to, from or in the territories. The Gaspé line has been closed for want of repair since 2013. Among Canada’s larger cities and provincial capitals, you can’t take the train to or from Victoria, Calgary, Regina, Thunder Bay, or Fredericton. Oh well.

I haven’t even mentioned the prospect of massive, embarrassing delays afflicting Guilbeault’s tour — though to be fair, the Canadian isn’t as “late” as it used to be, now that they’ve padded out the schedule to an astonishing 97 hours and 15 minutes westbound between Toronto and Vancouver.

To be fair to Via, it doesn’t own those tracks, and the Canadian isn’t really meant for regular travelling folks. It’s meant for people who can afford to pay $3,569 each for a two-person cabin, subsidized pre-COVID to the tune of $595 per passenger. I remain dumbfounded as to why Guilbeault or any other government minister would want to call attention to that. The rest at the above link.
 

Tecumsehsbones

Hall of Fame Member
Mar 18, 2013
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“Due to VIA Rail’s continued reduced capacity on their rail lines due to COVID as well as train car maintenance, logistically, it was not feasible to conduct a meaningful tour this year in all parts of the country,” Guilbeault’s office told the Post. (????)

Why would they do that? COVID or no COVID, train car maintenance or no train car maintenance, you cannot take a train to all parts of the country. You can’t take it to, from or in Newfoundland and Prince Edward Island — not since the late 1960s. Except for a tourist excursion train between Whitehorse and Skagway, Alaska, you can’t take it to, from or in the territories. The Gaspé line has been closed for want of repair since 2013. Among Canada’s larger cities and provincial capitals, you can’t take the train to or from Victoria, Calgary, Regina, Thunder Bay, or Fredericton. Oh well.

I haven’t even mentioned the prospect of massive, embarrassing delays afflicting Guilbeault’s tour — though to be fair, the Canadian isn’t as “late” as it used to be, now that they’ve padded out the schedule to an astonishing 97 hours and 15 minutes westbound between Toronto and Vancouver.

To be fair to Via, it doesn’t own those tracks, and the Canadian isn’t really meant for regular travelling folks. It’s meant for people who can afford to pay $3,569 each for a two-person cabin, subsidized pre-COVID to the tune of $595 per passenger. I remain dumbfounded as to why Guilbeault or any other government minister would want to call attention to that. The rest at the above link.
I'd estimate they're all stupid.

Or think y'all are.

Or both.
 
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spaminator

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Oct 26, 2009
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France battles massive wildfires, thousands evacuated
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Kylie Maclellan and Dominique Vidalon
Publishing date:Jul 19, 2022 • 14 hours ago • 3 minute read • Join the conversation

LONDON/PARIS — Firefighters in southwestern France battled on Tuesday to contain massive forest wildfires and Britain recorded its highest ever temperature, while Portugal reported more than 1,000 heatwave-related deaths as Europe scorches.


Southern and western Germany and Belgium were also braced for potentially record-breaking temperatures as the heatwave, which scientists attribute to climate change, edged north and east.

Numerous wildfires were reported in Italy. One of the biggest blazes broke out on Monday night in the hills of Massarosa in Tuscany, and was still raging on Tuesday afternoon.

“Fire continues to devour the woods in a frightening way due to the wind,” Tuscany Governor Eugenio Giani said, noting that 365 hectares (900 acres) of land had been destroyed.

Fires were also reported in woods near Rome, as well as on the shores of Lake Orta north of Milan and near the northeastern city of Trieste.

A wildfire fueled by strong winds raged on a mountainous area near homes on the outskirts of Athens, prompting authorities to order the evacuation of at least one area.


A temperature of more than 40C was provisionally recorded for the first time in Britain, the Met Office said, and authorities have put Britain on a state of “national emergency” over the unprecedented temperatures.

Train routes from London up the east and west coast of the country were cancelled and normally busy city centres appeared quiet. Network Rail tweeted pictures showing bends and kinks in the tracks.

To the east of the capital a large fire engulfed homes in the village of Wennington, with flames tearing across neighboring fields and approaching a historic church. Large grass areas around the capital were on fire.

FIRES ‘NOT STABILIZED’
In southwestern France, the wine-growing Gironde region saw its biggest wildfires in over 30 years and authorities said a man had been detained on suspicion of arson.


The fires have spread across 19,300 hectares (about 75 square miles) in the countryside surrounding Bordeaux since July 12, forcing 34,000 people to evacuate their homes.

About 2,000 firefighters, supported by eight water-bomber aircraft, were battling the blazes.

With human-caused climate change triggering droughts, the number of extreme wildfires is expected to increase 30% within the next 28 years, according to a February 2022 United Nations report.

“We are seeing more frequent heatwaves, and the heatwaves are hotter than they would have been without climate change,” Friederike Otto, senior lecturer in climate science at Imperial College London, told Reuters.

The health impact of the heatwave has been in focus, with particular care given to the elderly and vulnerable.


The head of Portugal’s health authority DGS, Graça Freitas, told Reuters that 1,063 excess deaths due to the heatwave, above normal levels, were recorded from July 7 to 18.

“Portugal … is among one of the areas of the globe that could be (more) affected by extreme heat,” Freitas said. “We have to be more and more prepared for periods of high temperatures.”

Carlos Antunes, a researcher at Lisbon University’s faculty of sciences, said the data showed the elderly were most likely to die due to heatwaves.

Hot nighttime temperatures are also hindering firefighting responses across Europe and worsening health conditions as the night hours fail to provide a cooling reprieve, experts said on Tuesday.

FLAMES AND SMOKE

In Italy, temperatures were expected to hit 40C across a swathe of the north and centre this week, as well as the southern heel of Italy’s boot, Puglia, and the islands of Sardinia and Sicily.

Five cities were placed on the highest red alert because of the heatwave on Tuesday. The alert, which warns of serious health risks tied to the weather, will cover nine cities on Wednesday, rising to 14 on Thursday, including many of Italy’s largest metropolitan areas such as Rome, Milan and Florence.

Although the mercury dipped back towards more normal summer levels in Spain and Portugal, firefighters in both countries were still battling multiple blazes.

More than 30 wildfires continued to ravage parts of Spain, with authorities paying special attention to four blazes in Castile and Leon and Galicia.

In Losacio, in northwestern Zamora province, where two people have died and three were critically injured, more than 6,000 people in 32 villages have been evacuated.

So far this year 70,000 hectares (173,000 acres) have been burned in Spain, around twice the average of the last decade, official data showed before the heatwave.
 

pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
24,405
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B.C.
France battles massive wildfires, thousands evacuated
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Kylie Maclellan and Dominique Vidalon
Publishing date:Jul 19, 2022 • 14 hours ago • 3 minute read • Join the conversation

LONDON/PARIS — Firefighters in southwestern France battled on Tuesday to contain massive forest wildfires and Britain recorded its highest ever temperature, while Portugal reported more than 1,000 heatwave-related deaths as Europe scorches.


Southern and western Germany and Belgium were also braced for potentially record-breaking temperatures as the heatwave, which scientists attribute to climate change, edged north and east.

Numerous wildfires were reported in Italy. One of the biggest blazes broke out on Monday night in the hills of Massarosa in Tuscany, and was still raging on Tuesday afternoon.

“Fire continues to devour the woods in a frightening way due to the wind,” Tuscany Governor Eugenio Giani said, noting that 365 hectares (900 acres) of land had been destroyed.

Fires were also reported in woods near Rome, as well as on the shores of Lake Orta north of Milan and near the northeastern city of Trieste.

A wildfire fueled by strong winds raged on a mountainous area near homes on the outskirts of Athens, prompting authorities to order the evacuation of at least one area.


A temperature of more than 40C was provisionally recorded for the first time in Britain, the Met Office said, and authorities have put Britain on a state of “national emergency” over the unprecedented temperatures.

Train routes from London up the east and west coast of the country were cancelled and normally busy city centres appeared quiet. Network Rail tweeted pictures showing bends and kinks in the tracks.

To the east of the capital a large fire engulfed homes in the village of Wennington, with flames tearing across neighboring fields and approaching a historic church. Large grass areas around the capital were on fire.

FIRES ‘NOT STABILIZED’
In southwestern France, the wine-growing Gironde region saw its biggest wildfires in over 30 years and authorities said a man had been detained on suspicion of arson.


The fires have spread across 19,300 hectares (about 75 square miles) in the countryside surrounding Bordeaux since July 12, forcing 34,000 people to evacuate their homes.

About 2,000 firefighters, supported by eight water-bomber aircraft, were battling the blazes.

With human-caused climate change triggering droughts, the number of extreme wildfires is expected to increase 30% within the next 28 years, according to a February 2022 United Nations report.

“We are seeing more frequent heatwaves, and the heatwaves are hotter than they would have been without climate change,” Friederike Otto, senior lecturer in climate science at Imperial College London, told Reuters.

The health impact of the heatwave has been in focus, with particular care given to the elderly and vulnerable.


The head of Portugal’s health authority DGS, Graça Freitas, told Reuters that 1,063 excess deaths due to the heatwave, above normal levels, were recorded from July 7 to 18.

“Portugal … is among one of the areas of the globe that could be (more) affected by extreme heat,” Freitas said. “We have to be more and more prepared for periods of high temperatures.”

Carlos Antunes, a researcher at Lisbon University’s faculty of sciences, said the data showed the elderly were most likely to die due to heatwaves.

Hot nighttime temperatures are also hindering firefighting responses across Europe and worsening health conditions as the night hours fail to provide a cooling reprieve, experts said on Tuesday.

FLAMES AND SMOKE

In Italy, temperatures were expected to hit 40C across a swathe of the north and centre this week, as well as the southern heel of Italy’s boot, Puglia, and the islands of Sardinia and Sicily.

Five cities were placed on the highest red alert because of the heatwave on Tuesday. The alert, which warns of serious health risks tied to the weather, will cover nine cities on Wednesday, rising to 14 on Thursday, including many of Italy’s largest metropolitan areas such as Rome, Milan and Florence.

Although the mercury dipped back towards more normal summer levels in Spain and Portugal, firefighters in both countries were still battling multiple blazes.

More than 30 wildfires continued to ravage parts of Spain, with authorities paying special attention to four blazes in Castile and Leon and Galicia.

In Losacio, in northwestern Zamora province, where two people have died and three were critically injured, more than 6,000 people in 32 villages have been evacuated.

So far this year 70,000 hectares (173,000 acres) have been burned in Spain, around twice the average of the last decade, official data showed before the heatwave.
Never happened before , ever .
 

Dixie Cup

House Member
Sep 16, 2006
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Subject:
Tractors & Combines

....talk about brain phartz......
A close friend farms over 10,000 acres of corn in the mid-west. The property is spread out over 3 counties. His operation is a "partnership farm" with John Deere. They use the larger farm operations as demonstration projects for promotion and development of new equipment. He recently received a phone call from his John Deere representative, and they want the farm to go to electric tractors and combines in 2023. He currently has 5 diesel combines that cost $900,000 each that are traded in every 3 years. Also, over 10 really BIG tractors.
JD wants him to go all electric soon.
He said: "Ok, I have some questions. How do I charge these combines when they are 3 counties away from the shop in the middle of a cornfield, in the middle of nowhere?" "How do I run them 24 hours a day for 10 or 12 days straight when the harvest is ready, and the weather is coming in?" "How do I get a 50,000+ lb. combine that takes up the width of an entire road back to the shop 20 miles away when the battery goes dead?"
There was dead silence on the other end of the phone.

When the corn is ready to harvest, it has to have the proper sugar and moisture content. If it is too wet, it has to be put in giant dryers that burn natural or propane gas, and lots of it. Harvest time is critical because if it degrades in sugar content or quality, it can drop the value of his crop by half a million dollars or more. It is analyzed at time of sale. It is standard procedure to run these machines 10 to 12 days straight, 24 hours a day at peak harvest time. When they need fuel, a tanker truck delivers it, and the machines keep going. John Deere's only answer is "we're working on it." They are being pushed by the lefty Dems in the government to force these electric machines on the American farmer. These people are out of control. They are messing with the production of food crops that feed people and livestock... all in the name of their "green dream."

Look for the cost of your box of cornflakes to triple in the next 24 months...




 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
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It gets worse. Human input is about to drop off the cliff. The ag equipment only needs humans to fix them.

The tech to go operator free is already old news, putting it into operation is going to see a lot of broken hearted, destitute producers and shit loads of violence from those who arent equipped to make a profit.

Serfdom is back in full force, its time to fight.
 
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petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
101,272
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…and when it’s -30C in the winter you will pay good money to travel to countries that have this weather..

Enjoy the weather, it’s called summer.. no hotter that 1970.
All the way to Spain where they live through heat without fat people dieing in droves. A Spaniard would be shivering in a UK summer.

Why did the UK get hot? Cooler than usual ocean temps aren't carrying heat in the form of water vapour inland for it to rain inland. This causes ground heating that just gets warmer and warmer.

Voila! The birth of a heatwave.
 
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