Homeless Tent Cities in Canada

pgs

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Nov 29, 2008
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With four councillors calling for immediate action to deal with the homelessness situation in Regina, the issue — one of the main topics for Wednesday’s city council meeting — was postponed to a later date.
Mayor Sandra Masters told council that questions and discussions will be held until Sept. 13.

The mayor added that the city is doing what it can.

“We continue to work with the province and the federal government on the issue,” she said. “Clearly, it’s ongoing.”

Last year, city council passed a motion to eradicate homelessness but did not provide the funding for that program.
With four councillors calling for immediate action to deal with the homelessness situation in Regina, the issue — one of the main topics for Wednesday’s city council meeting — was postponed to a later date.
Mayor Sandra Masters told council that questions and discussions will be held until Sept. 13.

The mayor added that the city is doing what it can.

“We continue to work with the province and the federal government on the issue,” she said. “Clearly, it’s ongoing.”

Last year, city council passed a motion to eradicate homelessness but did not provide the funding for that program.
Kick in down the road until winter , deal with it again next spring .
 
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Dixie Cup

Senate Member
Sep 16, 2006
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That is not quite true. The building can be assembled in 28 hrs. But it takes months to make all the pieces and make a foundation.
Mostly what we need is for the government to quit "helping". High interest rates and endless red tape from multiple levels of government have put the brakes on many housing projects, leaving around 45000 construction workers unemployed.
Just one example of provincial government stupidity:
From todays Times Colonist. Nanaimo will not have to do a potable groundwater study before redevelopment of the downtown area. This has been a holdup for a number of years. No one drinks groundwater in the entire area, but the government bureaucracy has been insisting on a study for reasons known only to themselves.
There is an issue with the building that can be assembled in 28 hours & that is to have the manufacturing already in place. Once it is, then there shouldn't be any issue. It will take time to set up, but once done, should be easy peasy - mind you if government is involved, it will NOT go easy peasy 'cuz gov't for the most part don't have a clue what they're doing.
 

petros

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Nov 21, 2008
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There is an issue with the building that can be assembled in 28 hours & that is to have the manufacturing already in place. Once it is, then there shouldn't be any issue. It will take time to set up, but once done, should be easy peasy - mind you if government is involved, it will NOT go easy peasy 'cuz gov't for the most part don't have a clue what they're doing.
It can be done very very quickly when all the trades and supplies are coordinated.
 

TheShadow

Electoral Member
Apr 24, 2020
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Grand Bend
The social system has been given too much social power and there is no consequence for people living/working/using under that umbrella.

Until someone with the guts and ability to weather the SJW storm stands up and says, "No more," this will continue to happen.
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
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Regina, Saskatchewan
Another day, another landmark of urban decline. Early this morning CBC News brings word that the public park space immediately in front of Regina’s city hall will remain fenced off indefinitely.

The ghost of this bourgeois public amenity remains, perhaps as a monument to the formerly existing civilization of Western Canada, but it can’t be used for meals and summer relaxation in the way it was intended — not even, at this point, by the drug addicts who colonized it in June as a place to live rent-free. If junkies can’t use the space, it seems, nobody can.

As a reminder of what everyone seems to have forgotten, urban parks for the use of families of all social classes were once considered a great progressive achievement of North American cities. Very suddenly they have become a theatre of class war and anarchist street action.

The park at Regina’s city hall grew to enormous size, with 80-plus tents, very quickly in the face of inaction by a city council with a strong leftist increment. The option of simply forbidding initial occupation of public land in Canadian cities seems to have gone by the wayside in general: no elected politician or police official can know what social parameters will be invoked by judges to thwart or enjoin on-the-spot bylaw enforcement of the kind on which public parks are inherently predicated.

The mayor, naturally unhappy with the drama on her doorstep, called and then cancelled a special meeting of city council to address the issue. She and her colleagues are still bickering over exactly what happened, but it does look like a failed attempt to catch some of the bleeding-heart councillors off guard during the summer.
Kick in down the road until winter , deal with it again next spring .
= a plethora of garage fires, break-ins of empty houses, etc…& then those get burned down too.
Alas, the residents of the camp, true to universal form, began having tent fires — leading the city’s fire chief to invoke emergency powers under the Fire Safety Act to order a police clear-out of the colony.

Mass occupations of public property certainly shouldn’t be allowed to fester to the point at which a “wall of police” has to fight through a pack of aging hippies and self-designated social workers to re-establish public property as property. The essence of property is that it can be regulated, can be reserved for some particular uses, can even have a giant ugly fence constructed around it.

Whatever your belief about the ultimate causes of the homelessness crisis, it shouldn’t be treated by judges or anyone else as some universal moral acid that dissolves public property, but here we are.

The usual suspects have come forward to say that it is unacceptable to take back parks for truly common use until governments fix all of the “underlying” social problems. And of course it’s not nice for the outdoorsy poor, who almost unanimously refused shelter support before fires decided the fate of the City Hall tent camp, to have to recommence the classic vagrancy cycle of ceaseless dazed wandering. Perhaps ceaseless dazed wandering looked nicer in the brochure.

But look where these increasingly scripted arms races that build up around mass vagrant tent camps are leading us. Zombie nomads teetering on the edge of death descend on some patch of green; socially conscious caterers cluster around them to make sure everyone’s getting sandwiches and wet wipes and medications and clean needles; the property-owning and -renting neighbours hunker down, hoping the theft, affrays and filth won’t get too horrible; and when things get bad enough there’s a purgative riot with a handful of unreassuring arrests.

Link. Above. More, etc….
 
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petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
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Another day, another landmark of urban decline. Early this morning CBC News brings word that the public park space immediately in front of Regina’s city hall will remain fenced off indefinitely.

The ghost of this bourgeois public amenity remains, perhaps as a monument to the formerly existing civilization of Western Canada, but it can’t be used for meals and summer relaxation in the way it was intended — not even, at this point, by the drug addicts who colonized it in June as a place to live rent-free. If junkies can’t use the space, it seems, nobody can.

As a reminder of what everyone seems to have forgotten, urban parks for the use of families of all social classes were once considered a great progressive achievement of North American cities. Very suddenly they have become a theatre of class war and anarchist street action.

The park at Regina’s city hall grew to enormous size, with 80-plus tents, very quickly in the face of inaction by a city council with a strong leftist increment. The option of simply forbidding initial occupation of public land in Canadian cities seems to have gone by the wayside in general: no elected politician or police official can know what social parameters will be invoked by judges to thwart or enjoin on-the-spot bylaw enforcement of the kind on which public parks are inherently predicated.

The mayor, naturally unhappy with the drama on her doorstep, called and then cancelled a special meeting of city council to address the issue. She and her colleagues are still bickering over exactly what happened, but it does look like a failed attempt to catch some of the bleeding-heart councillors off guard during the summer.


Alas, the residents of the camp, true to universal form, began having tent fires — leading the city’s fire chief to invoke emergency powers under the Fire Safety Act to order a police clear-out of the colony.

Mass occupations of public property certainly shouldn’t be allowed to fester to the point at which a “wall of police” has to fight through a pack of aging hippies and self-designated social workers to re-establish public property as property. The essence of property is that it can be regulated, can be reserved for some particular uses, can even have a giant ugly fence constructed around it.

Whatever your belief about the ultimate causes of the homelessness crisis, it shouldn’t be treated by judges or anyone else as some universal moral acid that dissolves public property, but here we are.

The usual suspects have come forward to say that it is unacceptable to take back parks for truly common use until governments fix all of the “underlying” social problems. And of course it’s not nice for the outdoorsy poor, who almost unanimously refused shelter support before fires decided the fate of the City Hall tent camp, to have to recommence the classic vagrancy cycle of ceaseless dazed wandering. Perhaps ceaseless dazed wandering looked nicer in the brochure.

But look where these increasingly scripted arms races that build up around mass vagrant tent camps are leading us. Zombie nomads teetering on the edge of death descend on some patch of green; socially conscious caterers cluster around them to make sure everyone’s getting sandwiches and wet wipes and medications and clean needles; the property-owning and -renting neighbours hunker down, hoping the theft, affrays and filth won’t get too horrible; and when things get bad enough there’s a purgative riot with a handful of unreassuring arrests.

Link. Above. More, etc….
There is a solution. Moonbats won't like it but it's a solution. It's 100% legal but would be controversial. Whip out the Mental Health Act.
 
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spaminator

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Oct 26, 2009
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Tent city Toronto growing again in downtown core
Downtown Toronto parks and parkettes are now the new homes for the homeless as tent city returns

Author of the article:Jack Boland
Published Aug 23, 2023 • Last updated 2 days ago • 2 minute read

It is hard enough to traverse the downtown core of the city by foot, on two wheels or four.


But try walking through some of its more famous, or now infamous, parks.


Tent city seems to be back in full force at Alexandra Park, Allan Gardens, Clarence Square Park, Lamport Stadium, Rosedale Valley Rd. and little parkettes like Severn Creek Park.

In July 2021, City of Toronto officials and bylaw officers with the help of Toronto Police cleared out large encampments at Alexandra Park and the west side of Lamport Stadium — and not without violent confrontations involving homeless and advocates.

On Tuesday, a tour of some of these tent cities showed that they’re back.

A work crew at Clarence Square Park — a little parkette at Wellington St. and Spadina Ave. — said they have been installing new water mains to replace crumbling infrastructure for the past few weeks.




Two of the workers said a few of the residents of the enclosures in the encampment have come over to voice their displeasure with the workers — for doing their jobs — and become violent and confrontational to the point they had to call police so they could complete their work.

Up in the Rosedale Valley Rd. area, off of Park Rd., neighbours are scared to go out for a stroll or to walk their dogs in the area or in a local parkette, Severn Creek Park, which leads up to the Rosedale TTC subway station.



One woman walking her dog said a large tent popped up and she can no longer walk her dog through the parkette because of drug paraphernalia, garbage and human feces.

Another group of dog walkers kept their pooches close and chose different trails and paths around the tent, which they said had been dragged from an encampment on Rosedale Valley Rd.

The large blue-and-beige tent supposedly has multiple rooms inside with a front room and living quarters. Area residents claim it is more of a drug den than a dwelling.

It is nestled into the tree line and has a path leading down to it from an alternate trail.

jboland@postmedia.com
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
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Regina, Saskatchewan
No one was injured early Monday after a fire broke out in a tent encampment in the 900 block of Angus Street.
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Regina Fire and Protective Services said in a social media post that the fire spread from the encampment to a neighbouring house and shed.
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The fire department didn’t say what caused the fire or the estimate of the damages. The post said firefighters extinguished the fire quickly.
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
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Ontario ad offers tent space in ‘private encampment’ for $500
Author of the article:Denette Wilford
Published Apr 16, 2024 • Last updated 1 day ago • 2 minute read

An Ontario landlord posted an ad on Kijiji asking people to pay $500 to put up tents in what was described as a “private encampment.”


The rental listing — “Help for people in homeless tent encampment private property” — for the Innisfil property, which has since been deleted, appeared to be aimed at those struggling to remain in tents located in parks in Toronto and surrounding areas.


The ad, which had been screenshot and shared on social media, read: “We are welcoming people who are living in their tents … to set up on our cottage property in the town of Innisfil Ontario,” noting it was on “private property,” according to The Publica.

While the listing doesn’t state the cost of rent, Innisfil Today reported it was listed at $500. However, it’s unclear if that was a monthly or one-time fee.

The ad also said “tenants” would have access to electricity, a bathroom, a community fridge in a common kitchen, could walk to the nearby beach and that there were even “job opportunities” available.


However, the words “for-profit encampment” rankled many, the outlet reported, while others had issues with Barrie-Innisfil MPP Andrea Khanjin unwittingly sending individuals seeking shelter to the 25th Sideroad property.

“This week in the housing crisis: ‘for-profit homeless encampment’ is a phrase I just read,” writer and podcaster John Michael McGrath posted on X.



Another user asked, “What is a for-profit homeless encampment? I don’t understand.”

National Post columnist Tristin Hopper captured the snafu perfectly.

“It’s hard to describe to foreigners that Canada is simultaneously a socialist dystopia and a capitalist dystopia,” he wrote on X.

“We’re actively suppressing wages and inflating real estate with needlessly high immigration, and then sending the casualties to private tent encampments.”



A spokesperson for the Town of Innisfil could not say whether the landlord was violating any municipal bylaws, but added the matter was being investigated.

A spokesperson for Barrie Homelessness and Housing Justice Network called the private encampment plan “well-meaning” but acknowledged it is “pretty exploitative of people in a very vulnerable position.”
 

petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
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There is an expensive and despised drug nobody thinks of as a path to homelessness.

Nicotine.

Free the smokes!