Gun Control is Completely Useless.

pgs

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Last time I was stopped coming from the wine and beer store the officer made me blow , after the third failed attempt he threatened me with failure to blow . Finally after about five attempts I found enough air to make it work . The officer was pissed off the breathalyzer showed zero blood alcohol.
RCMP of course .
 

Ron in Regina

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Apr 9, 2008
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Last time I was stopped coming from the wine and beer store the officer made me blow , after the third failed attempt he threatened me with failure to blow . Finally after about five attempts I found enough air to make it work . The officer was pissed off the breathalyzer showed zero blood alcohol.
I’m assuming that you can’t consume alcohol at the beer and wine store? It’s just the point of sale purchase place?

If so, prior to this previous government, what you describing would probably have been seen as harassment I would guess. Previous to the current government, what reason would they have to suspect that you’ve been drinking as you’re leaving a retail establishment where you can’t consume alcohol on site?

Were you driving erratically (?) or walking in a zigzag pattern as if you were avoiding gunfire (?) or some other reason to raise their curiosity and suspicion? Just lucky?
 

Ron in Regina

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Apr 9, 2008
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The Toronto Police are now advising residents to make it easier for criminals to steal their car.

At least, that’s the popular interpretation of a Toronto Police officer telling a town hall that homeowners should keep the keys to their car near the front door so that they “don’t get attacked.”

“They’re breaking into your home to steal your car. They don’t want anything else,” he said.

Fortunately, this doesn’t appear to be representative of departmental policy. Within hours of the statement, Toronto Police published a guide saying that while the key idea was “well meaning,” there are “also other ways to prevent auto theft motivated home invasions.”

In addition to immediately surrendering their automobile to home invaders, Torontonians were informed they could also “install a home security system” or “keep backyard gates locked.”

No, this is not from the Beaverton. That is all.

The Law & Order order spinoff series set in Toronto is being described highly unrealistic, as it depicts the Toronto Police repeatedly attempting to actually solve crimes and do police work.

John Brimshaw, a television critic for The Toronto Star, cited a baffling early episode where citizens come forward with reports of multiple missing persons in a specific neighborhood. The Toronto police take the reports seriously and end up uncovering a serial killer, instead of just ignoring the reports and then accidentally catching the serial killer a year and half later.

Globe and Mail arts columnist Kathleen Karter was equally critical in her review, finding one episode about an auto-theft ring particularly far-fetched. In it, the Toronto Police track the ring to a railyard and recover hundreds of vehicles instead of just telling victims to call their insurance companies, and, when given the exact location of the stolen vehicles by citizens with AirTags hidden in their cars, claim they don’t have jurisdiction over trains. This is actually from the Beaverton, but it’s hard to tell which of the above is satire.
 
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Tecumsehsbones

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“They’re breaking into your home to steal your car. They don’t want anything else,” he said.

Fortunately, this doesn’t appear to be representative of departmental policy. Within hours of the statement, Toronto Police published a guide saying that while the key idea was “well meaning,” there are “also other ways to prevent auto theft motivated home invasions.”

In addition to immediately surrendering their automobile to home invaders, Torontonians were informed they could also “install a home security system” or “keep backyard gates locked.”
OK, I'm gonna run up to TO and establish a "Car Theft Drop-Off." Cuz there's no reason to break into your house at all if you just bring the car to the thieves.
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
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Regina, Saskatchewan
Wes Winkel, president of the Canadian Sporting Arms and Ammunition Association (CSAAA,) said the government apparently didn’t anticipate that its ban on “assault-style” firearms involved a massive number of parts and accessories that could be captured by the buyback’s planned expropriation, which will require gun owners and retailers holding inventory of those items to be compensated.

Who is Wes Winkel? He’s the guy heading the organization tasked with helping retailers navigate the Trudeau Liberals’ mandatory gun “buyback” says the government has bit off far more than it can chew and is now discovering the difficulty with the sheer volume of items it may have to expropriate.

The amnesty on banned guns is set to expire at the end of October 2025, presuming a buyback regime is in place by then to provide owners and retailers compensation for their seized weapons. But Winkel expects the process is turning out to be much more complicated and much more expensive than the federal government anticipated.

“They don’t understand that liaising with industry should have happened before the regulations were drafted,” he said. Kind’a like consulting with the provinces before stomping on their jurisdiction and then ignoring them I guess.

The CSAAA’s involvement in the process began last April, when the federal government rolled out the first phase of its confiscation scheme. The association was asked to act as a knowledgeable conduit between bureaucrats and businesses who sell firearms and have been stuck with unsellable inventory as a result of the bans.

“That’s where we come in, where we assist them in the procedures and say ‘yes, these 10 firearms are prohibited but only these seven are covered by the buyback.'”

He said that if the government doesn’t have a buyback in place by October 2025 when the amnesty is set to expire, businesses holding now-banned inventory will be stuck in a legal grey zone.

“Once that amnesty expires, if we don’t deal with this inventory, then we can no longer get import permits and conduct our business in a regular fashion,” he said.

Internal government documents obtained last year through an access-to-information request showed the cost of the program, which the Liberals had promised would be between $400 million and $600 million, had ballooned to $2 billion.

Last month, National Post reported that the government had spent $42 million on setting up the buyback already, even though it still doesn’t exist.

“The costs have ballooned on the administration side,” Winkel said. “They’ve used up so much budget already, and they still haven’t bought anything.”

While Winkle is prohibited from discussing all the specifics of his work with government due to a non-disclosure agreement, he said the program has been painful to be a part of.

“The bureaucracy is just growing and growing,” he said.
 

pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
26,648
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B.C.
Wes Winkel, president of the Canadian Sporting Arms and Ammunition Association (CSAAA,) said the government apparently didn’t anticipate that its ban on “assault-style” firearms involved a massive number of parts and accessories that could be captured by the buyback’s planned expropriation, which will require gun owners and retailers holding inventory of those items to be compensated.

Who is Wes Winkel? He’s the guy heading the organization tasked with helping retailers navigate the Trudeau Liberals’ mandatory gun “buyback” says the government has bit off far more than it can chew and is now discovering the difficulty with the sheer volume of items it may have to expropriate.

The amnesty on banned guns is set to expire at the end of October 2025, presuming a buyback regime is in place by then to provide owners and retailers compensation for their seized weapons. But Winkel expects the process is turning out to be much more complicated and much more expensive than the federal government anticipated.

“They don’t understand that liaising with industry should have happened before the regulations were drafted,” he said. Kind’a like consulting with the provinces before stomping on their jurisdiction and then ignoring them I guess.

The CSAAA’s involvement in the process began last April, when the federal government rolled out the first phase of its confiscation scheme. The association was asked to act as a knowledgeable conduit between bureaucrats and businesses who sell firearms and have been stuck with unsellable inventory as a result of the bans.

“That’s where we come in, where we assist them in the procedures and say ‘yes, these 10 firearms are prohibited but only these seven are covered by the buyback.'”

He said that if the government doesn’t have a buyback in place by October 2025 when the amnesty is set to expire, businesses holding now-banned inventory will be stuck in a legal grey zone.

“Once that amnesty expires, if we don’t deal with this inventory, then we can no longer get import permits and conduct our business in a regular fashion,” he said.

Internal government documents obtained last year through an access-to-information request showed the cost of the program, which the Liberals had promised would be between $400 million and $600 million, had ballooned to $2 billion.

Last month, National Post reported that the government had spent $42 million on setting up the buyback already, even though it still doesn’t exist.

“The costs have ballooned on the administration side,” Winkel said. “They’ve used up so much budget already, and they still haven’t bought anything.”

While Winkle is prohibited from discussing all the specifics of his work with government due to a non-disclosure agreement, he said the program has been painful to be a part of.

“The bureaucracy is just growing and growing,” he said.
Gee , isn’t that what bureaucracy does best .