Floriduh

spaminator

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Oct 26, 2009
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Article

Long story short. . . Floriduh's new abortion law is requiring a woman to carry to term a darling widdle bee-bee who has no kidneys, won't be able to breathe, and will die 20 minutes to two hours after being born.

I am sure that all them Gawd-fearin' conservatives out there are delighted with this outcome.
the agony of de fetus. ;)
 

spaminator

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Brain-eating amoeba kills Florida man
Author of the article:Liz Braun
Published Mar 02, 2023 • Last updated 1 day ago • 2 minute read
Naegleria fowleri
Naegleria fowleri PHOTO BY TWITTER /Toronto Sun
A rare, brain-eating amoeba may sound like an invention of The X-Files, but it’s real in Florida.


NBC news reports that health officials in Charlotte County confirm one man is dead after rinsing his sinuses with tap water.


A February 23 press release from the Florida Department of Health – Charlotte said one case of infection with the amoeba Naegleria fowleri was indeed linked to tap water in the nasal passages.

Infection with Naegleria fowleri is rare, the release emphasizes, and can only happen when water contaminated with amoebae enters the body through the nose — you can’t be infected by drinking tap water.

Inadequate chlorination could account for N Fowleri being in tap water.

The organism is found in fresh water and soil around the world, and thrives in high temperatures.

Infections are usually reported in summer and are usually pegged to swimming in warm lakes or rivers; climate change has seen infection reports steadily climbing northward.


DOH-Charlotte, meanwhile, continues to investigate and has advised residents to use only distilled or sterile water when preparing sinus rinse solutions, which means using boiled water that has boiled at least one minute, and then cooled.

It is also advised not to let water get up the nose when bathing, showering or swimming. People are instructed to neither jump into the water nor submerge their head when swimming.

Children should not be allowed to run through the sprinkler or play unsupervised with a water hose. Small wading pools and plastic pools used by children should be emptied and scrubbed, and allowed to dry before being used again.

Anyone who swims in warm lakes or rivers and then has symptoms such as headache, fever, nausea, confusion, seizures, loss of balance or hallucinations, should seek immediate medical help.

Once symptoms appear, the disease progresses quickly. Patients usually die within 18 days.

The Centre for Disease Control reported three confirmed cases of N. fowleri in 2022 in fresh water exposures in Iowa, Nebraska, and Arizona. Three cases were also reported every year in each of the three years prior.
1677953377118.png
 

pgs

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Nov 29, 2008
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Brain-eating amoeba kills Florida man
Author of the article:Liz Braun
Published Mar 02, 2023 • Last updated 1 day ago • 2 minute read
Naegleria fowleri
Naegleria fowleri PHOTO BY TWITTER /Toronto Sun
A rare, brain-eating amoeba may sound like an invention of The X-Files, but it’s real in Florida.


NBC news reports that health officials in Charlotte County confirm one man is dead after rinsing his sinuses with tap water.


A February 23 press release from the Florida Department of Health – Charlotte said one case of infection with the amoeba Naegleria fowleri was indeed linked to tap water in the nasal passages.

Infection with Naegleria fowleri is rare, the release emphasizes, and can only happen when water contaminated with amoebae enters the body through the nose — you can’t be infected by drinking tap water.

Inadequate chlorination could account for N Fowleri being in tap water.

The organism is found in fresh water and soil around the world, and thrives in high temperatures.

Infections are usually reported in summer and are usually pegged to swimming in warm lakes or rivers; climate change has seen infection reports steadily climbing northward.


DOH-Charlotte, meanwhile, continues to investigate and has advised residents to use only distilled or sterile water when preparing sinus rinse solutions, which means using boiled water that has boiled at least one minute, and then cooled.

It is also advised not to let water get up the nose when bathing, showering or swimming. People are instructed to neither jump into the water nor submerge their head when swimming.

Children should not be allowed to run through the sprinkler or play unsupervised with a water hose. Small wading pools and plastic pools used by children should be emptied and scrubbed, and allowed to dry before being used again.

Anyone who swims in warm lakes or rivers and then has symptoms such as headache, fever, nausea, confusion, seizures, loss of balance or hallucinations, should seek immediate medical help.

Once symptoms appear, the disease progresses quickly. Patients usually die within 18 days.

The Centre for Disease Control reported three confirmed cases of N. fowleri in 2022 in fresh water exposures in Iowa, Nebraska, and Arizona. Three cases were also reported every year in each of the three years prior.
View attachment 17526
Beaver fever ?
 

Taxslave2

House Member
Aug 13, 2022
3,186
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Beaver fever ?
Nah, Beaver Fever just gives you the shits for a while. Nearly everyone not from the coast has suffered it in logging camps. I don't know why it is that we are mostly immune. There are some other oddities like that. The black mould that we have everywhere, and we don't notice, really affects people not born here. My wife has been on the island for about 25 years now and it still bothers her.
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
36,513
3,144
113
Brain-eating amoeba kills Florida man
Author of the article:Liz Braun
Published Mar 02, 2023 • Last updated 1 day ago • 2 minute read
Naegleria fowleri
Naegleria fowleri PHOTO BY TWITTER /Toronto Sun
A rare, brain-eating amoeba may sound like an invention of The X-Files, but it’s real in Florida.


NBC news reports that health officials in Charlotte County confirm one man is dead after rinsing his sinuses with tap water.


A February 23 press release from the Florida Department of Health – Charlotte said one case of infection with the amoeba Naegleria fowleri was indeed linked to tap water in the nasal passages.

Infection with Naegleria fowleri is rare, the release emphasizes, and can only happen when water contaminated with amoebae enters the body through the nose — you can’t be infected by drinking tap water.

Inadequate chlorination could account for N Fowleri being in tap water.

The organism is found in fresh water and soil around the world, and thrives in high temperatures.

Infections are usually reported in summer and are usually pegged to swimming in warm lakes or rivers; climate change has seen infection reports steadily climbing northward.


DOH-Charlotte, meanwhile, continues to investigate and has advised residents to use only distilled or sterile water when preparing sinus rinse solutions, which means using boiled water that has boiled at least one minute, and then cooled.

It is also advised not to let water get up the nose when bathing, showering or swimming. People are instructed to neither jump into the water nor submerge their head when swimming.

Children should not be allowed to run through the sprinkler or play unsupervised with a water hose. Small wading pools and plastic pools used by children should be emptied and scrubbed, and allowed to dry before being used again.

Anyone who swims in warm lakes or rivers and then has symptoms such as headache, fever, nausea, confusion, seizures, loss of balance or hallucinations, should seek immediate medical help.

Once symptoms appear, the disease progresses quickly. Patients usually die within 18 days.

The Centre for Disease Control reported three confirmed cases of N. fowleri in 2022 in fresh water exposures in Iowa, Nebraska, and Arizona. Three cases were also reported every year in each of the three years prior.
View attachment 17526
too bad this wont work on politicians. 🧠 ;)
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
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Burning eyes, dead fish; red tide flares up on Florida coast
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Published Mar 11, 2023 • 1 minute read

SARASOTA, Fla. — Residents are complaining about burning eyes and breathing problems. Dead fish have washed up on beaches. A beachside festival has been canceled, even though it wasn’t scheduled for another month.


Florida’s southwest coast experienced a flare-up of the toxic red tide algae this week, setting off concerns that it could continue to stick around for a while. The current bloom started in October.


The annual BeachFest in Indian Rocks Beach, Florida, sponsored by a homeowners’ association, was cancelled after it determined, with help from the city and the Pinellas County Health Department, that red tide likely would continue through the middle of next month when the festival was scheduled.

“Red Tide is currently present on the beach and is forecasted to remain in the area in the weeks to come,” the Indian Rocks Beach Homeowners Association said in a letter to the public. “It is unfortunate that it had to be cancelled but it is the best decision in the interest of public health.”


Nearly two tons of debris, mainly dead fish, were cleared from Pinellas County beaches and brought to the landfill, county spokesperson Tony Fabrizio told the Tampa Bay Times. About 1,000 pounds (454 kilograms) of fish have been cleared from beaches in St. Pete Beach since the start of the month, Mandy Edmunds, a parks supervisor with the city, told the newspaper.

Red tide, a toxic algae bloom that occurs naturally in the Gulf of Mexico, is worsened by the presence of nutrients such as nitrogen in the water. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission warns people to not swim in or around red tide waters over the possibility of skin irritation, rashes and burning and sore eyes. People with asthma or lung disease should avoid beaches affected by the toxic algae.

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission on Friday reported that it had found red tide in 157 samples along Florida’s Gulf Coast, with the strongest concentrations along Pinellas and Sarasota counties.
 

Tecumsehsbones

Hall of Fame Member
Mar 18, 2013
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Washington DC

Florida bill would ban young girls from discussing periods in school​


By Timothy Bella
March 17, 2023

As Florida Republicans are introducing and advancing a wave of bills on gender and diversity that are likely to be signed into law by Gov. Ron DeSantis (R), one GOP lawmaker acknowledged this week that his proposed sexual health bill would ban girls from talking about their menstrual cycles in school.

During a Florida House Education Quality Subcommittee hearing Wednesday, state Rep. Ashley Gantt (D) questioned her Republican colleague, state Rep. Stan McClain, on his proposed legislation that would restrict certain educational materials used in state schools, which Democrats and critics have likened to banning books. House Bill 1069 would also require that instruction on sexual health, such as health education, sexually transmitted diseases and human sexuality, “only occur in grades 6 through 12,” which prompted Gantt to ask whether the proposed legislation would prohibit young girls from talking about their periods in school when they first start having them.
“So if little girls experience their menstrual cycle in fifth grade or fourth grade, will that prohibit conversations from them since they are in the grade lower than sixth grade?” Gantt asked.

McClain responded, “It would.”

Article

Fuckin' creepy.
 

Serryah

Executive Branch Member
Dec 3, 2008
9,317
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New Brunswick

Florida bill would ban young girls from discussing periods in school​


By Timothy Bella
March 17, 2023

As Florida Republicans are introducing and advancing a wave of bills on gender and diversity that are likely to be signed into law by Gov. Ron DeSantis (R), one GOP lawmaker acknowledged this week that his proposed sexual health bill would ban girls from talking about their menstrual cycles in school.

During a Florida House Education Quality Subcommittee hearing Wednesday, state Rep. Ashley Gantt (D) questioned her Republican colleague, state Rep. Stan McClain, on his proposed legislation that would restrict certain educational materials used in state schools, which Democrats and critics have likened to banning books. House Bill 1069 would also require that instruction on sexual health, such as health education, sexually transmitted diseases and human sexuality, “only occur in grades 6 through 12,” which prompted Gantt to ask whether the proposed legislation would prohibit young girls from talking about their periods in school when they first start having them.
“So if little girls experience their menstrual cycle in fifth grade or fourth grade, will that prohibit conversations from them since they are in the grade lower than sixth grade?” Gantt asked.

McClain responded, “It would.”

Article

Fuckin' creepy.

So... basically Florida is becoming the remake of the 50's where nothing was talked about, the US was superdooperoutstandingamazeballz! and being robotic was awesome.
 

pgs

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Nov 29, 2008
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So... basically Florida is becoming the remake of the 50's where nothing was talked about, the US was superdooperoutstandingamazeballz! and being robotic was awesome.
Hey that led to the sixties and the rock and roll revolution .
 
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Taxslave2

House Member
Aug 13, 2022
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Florida bill would ban young girls from discussing periods in school​


By Timothy Bella
March 17, 2023

As Florida Republicans are introducing and advancing a wave of bills on gender and diversity that are likely to be signed into law by Gov. Ron DeSantis (R), one GOP lawmaker acknowledged this week that his proposed sexual health bill would ban girls from talking about their menstrual cycles in school.

During a Florida House Education Quality Subcommittee hearing Wednesday, state Rep. Ashley Gantt (D) questioned her Republican colleague, state Rep. Stan McClain, on his proposed legislation that would restrict certain educational materials used in state schools, which Democrats and critics have likened to banning books. House Bill 1069 would also require that instruction on sexual health, such as health education, sexually transmitted diseases and human sexuality, “only occur in grades 6 through 12,” which prompted Gantt to ask whether the proposed legislation would prohibit young girls from talking about their periods in school when they first start having them.
“So if little girls experience their menstrual cycle in fifth grade or fourth grade, will that prohibit conversations from them since they are in the grade lower than sixth grade?” Gantt asked.

McClain responded, “It would.”

Article

Fuckin' creepy.
How many times would they have to fail to be having periods in grade 4?
Aside from that I don't see the purpose of this bill. Has florida been taken over by muslims?
 

pgs

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How many times would they have to fail to be having periods in grade 4?
Aside from that I don't see the purpose of this bill. Has florida been taken over by muslims?
It has not yet passed . Means nothing until governor signs it into law .
 

Tecumsehsbones

Hall of Fame Member
Mar 18, 2013
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"Hey, Bobby, what class do you have fifth per. . . um. . . fifth. . . um. . . 'session,' I guess?"

I can see chem class now. The Periodic Table of Elements with "Periodic" taped over.

First time a girl goes old school and says "I'm having my monthly," there go the calendars!

We'll have no discussion of "moon times." The Earth has no natural satellites!

And I don't care if you cut off a finger on the bandsaw in shop class, there will be no references to "bleeding!"

But do the drapes match the carpet?
 

pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
27,021
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B.C.
"Hey, Bobby, what class do you have fifth per. . . um. . . fifth. . . um. . . 'session,' I guess?"

I can see chem class now. The Periodic Table of Elements with "Periodic" taped over.

First time a girl goes old school and says "I'm having my monthly," there go the calendars!

We'll have no discussion of "moon times." The Earth has no natural satellites!

And I don't care if you cut off a finger on the bandsaw in shop class, there will be no references to "bleeding!"

But do the drapes match the carpet?
Periodic table in grade 4 ?
 
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Reactions: Taxslave2

Serryah

Executive Branch Member
Dec 3, 2008
9,317
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New Brunswick
"Hey, Bobby, what class do you have fifth per. . . um. . . fifth. . . um. . . 'session,' I guess?"

I can see chem class now. The Periodic Table of Elements with "Periodic" taped over.

First time a girl goes old school and says "I'm having my monthly," there go the calendars!

We'll have no discussion of "moon times." The Earth has no natural satellites!

And I don't care if you cut off a finger on the bandsaw in shop class, there will be no references to "bleeding!"

But do the drapes match the carpet?

Gruesome, but funny.

I just feel bad for the poor girls who are left in 50's era dark about periods. Bad as it is that parents in a lot of families don't talk about it, now they won't learn. How will they know if there are problems?

I suppose there's some asinine assumption that kids will talk to parents...