Donald Trump Announces 2016 White House Bid

justfred

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Dec 26, 2004
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I read on Aug 14, that old Donnie was indicted again, and what will his reaction be, not guilty. Then he will whine on his lying group, Un-truth social, instead of working on a defence. Is indictment number four his lucky number, or is he going for record?
 

Serryah

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I read on Aug 14, that old Donnie was indicted again, and what will his reaction be, not guilty. Then he will whine on his lying group, Un-truth social, instead of working on a defence. Is indictment number four his lucky number, or is he going for record?

Don't think he's indicted yet, but maybe later this week? It's coming from Georgia and that could be bad; it's not just the one county his people fucked around in, from last I heard.

And the man can't shut his mouth so I'm just waiting to see if any of these judges or prosecutors have balls to revoke his status as a free guy and shove him into jail for breaking conditions of his release.


ETA: Well shit, just seeing a video on that now. That's how fast news changes apparently. I went to bed at ten local and there was nada 'bout this yet that I saw.

Could not happen to a more deserving asshole.

JFC - FORTY-ONE counts, ninteen people and is 98 pages?! Wow... just... wow.
 

spaminator

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Donald Trump and 18 allies charged in Georgia election meddling
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Published Aug 14, 2023 • Last updated 1 day ago • 6 minute read

ATLANTA (AP) — Donald Trump and 18 allies were indicted in Georgia on Monday over their efforts to overturn his 2020 election loss in the state, with prosecutors using a statute normally associated with mobsters to accuse the former president, lawyers and other aides of a “criminal enterprise” to keep him in power.


The nearly 100-page indictment details dozens of acts by Trump or his allies to undo his defeat, including beseeching Georgia’s Republican secretary of state to find enough votes for him to win the battleground state; harassing an election worker who faced false claims of fraud; and attempting to persuade Georgia lawmakers to ignore the will of voters and appoint a new slate of electoral college electors favorable to Trump.


In one particularly brazen episode, it also outlines a plot involving one of his lawyers to access voting machines in a rural Georgia county and steal data from a voting machine company.

“The indictment alleges that rather than abide by Georgia’s legal process for election challenges, the defendants engaged in a criminal racketeering enterprise to overturn Georgia’s presidential election result,” Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis, whose office brought the case, said at a late-night news conference.


Other defendants include former White House chief of staff Mark Meadows; Trump attorney and former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani; and a Trump administration Justice Department official, Jeffrey Clark, who aided the then-president’s efforts to undo his election loss in Georgia. Other lawyers who advanced legally dubious ideas to overturn the results, including John Eastman, Sidney Powell and Kenneth Chesebro, were also charged.

Willis said the defendants would be permitted to voluntarily surrender by noon Aug. 25. She also said she plans to seek a trial date within six months and that she intends to try the defendants collectively.


The indictment bookends a remarkable crush of criminal cases _ four in five months, each in a different city — that would be daunting for anyone, never mind someone like Trump who is simultaneously balancing the roles of criminal defendant and presidential candidate.


It comes just two weeks after the Justice Department special counsel charged him in a vast conspiracy to overturn the election, underscoring how prosecutors after lengthy investigations that followed the Jan. 6, 2021 riot at the U.S. Capitol have now, two-and-a-half years later, taken steps to hold Trump to account for an assault on the underpinnings of American democracy.

The Georgia case covers some of the same ground as Trump’s recent indictment in Washington, including attempts he and his allies made to disrupt the electoral vote count at the Capitol. But in its sprawling web of defendants — 19 in total — the indictment stands apart from the more tightly targeted case brought by special counsel Jack Smith, which so far only names Trump as a defendant.


In charging close Trump aides who were referenced by Smith only as unindicted co-conspirators, the Georgia indictment alleges a scale of criminal conduct extending far beyond just the ex-president.

The indictment, with charges under the state’s racketeering law and language conjuring the seedy underworld of mob bosses and gang leaders, accuses the former president, his former chief of staff, Trump’s attorneys and the ex-New York mayor of being members of a “criminal organization” and “enterprise” that operated in Georgia and other states.

The indictment capped a chaotic day at the courthouse caused by the brief but mysterious posting on a county website of a list of criminal charges that were to be brought against the former president. Reuters, which published a copy of the document, said the filing was taken down quickly.


A Willis spokesperson said in the afternoon that it was “inaccurate” to say that an indictment had already been returned but declined to comment further on a kerfuffle that the Trump legal team jumped on to attack the investigation’s integrity.

Trump and his allies, who have characterized the investigation as politically motivated, immediately seized on the apparent error to claim that the process was rigged. Trump’s campaign aimed to fundraise off it, sending out an email with the since-deleted document embedded.

In a statement after the indictment was issued, Trump’s legal team said “the events that have unfolded today have been shocking and absurd, starting with the leak of a presumed and premature indictment before the witnesses had testified or the grand jurors had deliberated and ending with the District Attorney being unable to offer any explanation.”


The lawyers said prosecutors presenting their case “relied on witnesses who harbor their own personal and political interests _ some of whom ran campaigns touting their efforts against the accused.”

Trump responded to the indictment Tuesday by announcing a news conference for next week to present yet another “almost complete” report on the alleged fraud he has yet to prove nearly three years after the 2020 election.

Many of the 161 acts by Trump and his associates outlined in the Georgia indictment have already received widespread attention. That includes a Jan. 2, 2021, call in which Trump urged Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger to “find” the 11,780 votes needed to overturn his election loss. That call, prosecutors said, violated a Georgia law against soliciting a public official to violate their oath.


It also accuses Trump of making false statements and writings for a series of claims he made to Raffensperger and other state election officials, including that up to 300,000 ballots “were dropped mysteriously into the rolls” in the 2020 election, that more than 4,500 people voted who weren’t on registration lists and that a Fulton County election worker, Ruby Freeman, was a “professional vote scammer.”

Giuliani, meanwhile, is accused of making false statements for allegedly lying to lawmakers by claiming that more than 96,000 mail-in ballots were counted in Georgia despite there being no record of them having been returned to a county elections office, and that a voting machine in Michigan wrongly recorded 6,000 votes for Biden that were actually cast for Trump.


In a statement, Giuliani did not respond directly to the allegations but called the indictment an “affront to American democracy” and “just the next chapter in a book of lies.”

Also charged are individuals prosecutors say helped Trump and his allies on the ground in Georgia influence and intimidate election workers.

One man, Stephen Cliffgard Lee, was charged for allegedly traveling to Freeman’s home “with intent to influence her testimony.” Freeman and her daughter Shaye Moss testified to Congress last year about how Trump and his allies latched onto surveillance footage from November 2020 to accuse both women of committing voter fraud — allegations that were quickly debunked, yet spread widely across conservative media.


Both women, who are Black, faced death threats after the election.

The indictment also accuses Powell and several co-defendants of tampering with voting machines in Coffee County, Georgia, and stealing data belonging to Dominion Voting Systems, a producer of tabulation machines that has long been the focus of conspiracy theories. An attorney for Powell declined to comment.

According to evidence made public by the congressional committee investigating the Jan. 6 riot, Trump allies targeted Coffee County in search of evidence to back their theories of widespread voter fraud, allegedly copying data and software.

Besides the two election-related cases, Trump faces a separate federal indictment accusing him of illegally hoarding classified documents as well as a New York state case charging him with falsifying business records.

As indictments mount, Trump — the leading Republican candidate for president in 2024 — often invokes his distinction as the only former president to face criminal charges. He is campaigning and fundraising around these themes, portraying himself as the victim of Democratic prosecutors out to get him.

Republican allies once again quickly rallied to Trump’s defense. “Americans see through this desperate sham,” House Speaker Kevin McCarthy wrote on X, the platform formerly known as Twitter.
 

pgs

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Don't think he's indicted yet, but maybe later this week? It's coming from Georgia and that could be bad; it's not just the one county his people fucked around in, from last I heard.

And the man can't shut his mouth so I'm just waiting to see if any of these judges or prosecutors have balls to revoke his status as a free guy and shove him into jail for breaking conditions of his release.


ETA: Well shit, just seeing a video on that now. That's how fast news changes apparently. I went to bed at ten local and there was nada 'bout this yet that I saw.

Could not happen to a more deserving asshole.

JFC - FORTY-ONE counts, ninteen people and is 98 pages?! Wow... just... wow.
Swinging for the fences , but hey it keeps the focus off the Biden family corruption , so is a success no matter how this fizzles out .
 

Tecumsehsbones

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spaminator

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Quebec woman sentenced to 22 years for sending poisoned letter to Trump
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Published Aug 17, 2023 • Last updated 2 days ago • 4 minute read

WASHINGTON — A self-described “activist” from Quebec who pleaded guilty to sending Donald Trump a poison-laced letter at the height of the former president’s ill-fated 2020 re-election effort has been sentenced to nearly 22 years in prison.


Pascale Ferrier, 56, agreed to the 21-year, 10-month sentence as part of a plea agreement back in January, but D.C. district court Judge Dabney Friedrich had yet to finally sign off on the deal.


“I am not a terrorist,” Ferrier told Friedrich during a hearing Thursday in downtown Washington, inside the same courthouse where Trump pleaded not guilty to criminal charges two weeks ago.

“Terrorists widely spread terror and death by targeting innocent people. I saw my actions as an act of activism.”

Under the terms of the agreement, the French-born Ferrier pleaded guilty to a total of nine biological weapons charges, each of which carries a potential maximum sentence of life in prison. Only one of them is linked to the Trump letter. The rest are tied to an indictment in Texas, where Ferrier was accused of sending similar letters to police and prison officials after an altercation there in 2019.


She was arrested at the Canada-U.S. border in September 2020 and charged with sending the president a threatening letter laced with homemade ricin, a poison she brewed at her home in Montreal.

Intercepted two months before the 2020 election, the letter described Trump as an “ugly tyrant clown” and urged him to give up his bid to hold onto the White House.

“The only regret I have is that it didn’t work and I couldn’t stop Trump before he (executed his plan) to try to stay in power,” Ferrier told the court in her thick Parisian French accent.

“It was never my intention to harm innocent people. And in fact, I did not harm anyone.”

In delivering her sentence, however, Friedrich acknowledged the obvious discrepancy between Ferrier’s claims of intending no harm, as well as her benevolence behind bars, and the methods she used to express her brand of activism.


“I’m discouraged that there’s not either a realization or a willingness to look internally at what prompted this very inconsistent, almost aberrant behaviour, for your own future and your own peace of mind,” the judge said.

“It’s almost like two different personalities.”

The U.S. justice system does not look kindly upon such conduct, said assistant U.S. attorney Michael Friedman — a message that resonates anew in D.C. since the Capitol Hill riots of Jan. 6, 2021, unfolded just across the street.

“There is absolutely no place for politically motivated violence in the United States of America, a nation of laws where the people choose our leaders by voting,” Friedman said.

“Political violence deeply offends our cherished democratic history and traditions.”


A sentencing memorandum said Ferrier was an enthusiastic participant in and “valued contributor” to rehabilitation programs, and that she spent a lot of time confined to her cell during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“The parties urge this court to accept the agreed-upon sentence, not only because it reflects the appropriate sentence for such cases, but also because such a sentence would be sufficient but not greater than necessary,” it reads.

Ferrier — an “inordinately intelligent” and “extremely accomplished” person with a master’s degree in engineering, her lawyer, Eugene Ohm, noted — completed several Georgetown University courses while behind bars, earning nearly straight As.

Indeed, Friedrich agreed to consider a delay in signing off on the paperwork to ensure Ferrier would be able to attend her graduation ceremony next month.


“You must be the valedictorian,” she joked.

Ferrier has already agreed to be removed from the U.S. after she serves her sentence, forfeiting opportunities to reduce her time behind bars, and could also face charges in Canada of manufacturing a prohibited substance, the sentencing document notes.

The sentence “will aptly reflect Ms. Ferrier’s history and characteristics, most notably, her lack of a criminal record, her age, and her close ties to her family, her acceptance of responsibility and her attempts to improve herself while incarcerated.”

Friedrich also ordered that Ferrier be placed under supervised release once her prison time is complete — a largely academic step, the judge acknowledged, since Ferrier is to be deported back to Canada. Ohm tried in vain to argue otherwise, but Friedrich imposed the condition anyway as an “additional deterrent” to ensure Ferrier doesn’t try to re-enter the U.S.


As part of the agreement, Ferrier pleaded guilty to eight charges related to several similar letters she sent to police and prison officials in Texas.

According to prosecutors, the letter to Trump described the poison as a “special gift” and threatened to “find a better recipe for another poison, or I might use my gun when I’ll be able to come.” The letters were all signed “Free Rebel Spirit.”

The FBI said the letter, intercepted less than two months before the 2020 presidential election, contained a powdery white substance and accused Trump of ruining the U.S., calling on him to “give up” his re-election bid.

Authorities said that when Ferrier was arrested trying to enter the U.S., she was in possession of a loaded handgun, nearly 300 rounds of ammunition, a stun gun, pepper spray, a truncheon and a fake Texas driver’s licence.
 

55Mercury

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May 31, 2007
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My comment stands!

I wonder if she got the ricin idea after watching Breaking Bad.

damn, she's butt-ugly though.
 

spaminator

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Big Apple mobsters 'f***ing thrilled' at Rudy Giuliani legal woes
'Indicted by the very law that he championed'


Author of the article:Brad Hunter
Published Aug 17, 2023 • Last updated 2 days ago • 3 minute read

Once upon a time, Rudolph Giuliani wore the white hat as the Mob-busting U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York.


It was a quasi-religious crusade for Giuliani, stemming from what went down in the old neighbourhood when he was a kid. And during the Mafia Commission Trials in the 1980s, he sent hundreds of goodfellas up the river and down the toilet.


Now, as former U.S. President Donald Trump’s consigliere (think Robert Duvall’s character Tom Hagen in The Godfather), Giuliani is facing the arsenal of legal tools he wielded so effectively as a prosecutor.

On Monday night in Fulton County, Ga., Trump, Giuliani and 17 others were indicted by a grand jury on 41 RICO-related counts over their alleged efforts to overturn Trump’s 2020 election loss in the state.

Giuliani’s own use of RICO statutes obliterated the heads of the New York underworld’s Five Families.


And the gangsters he sent away? They’re now loving the heat on Giuliani.

Famed Big Apple Mob lawyer Murray “Don’t Worry” Richman told The Messenger his clients are “f***ing thrilled” and “laughing” at the former mayor’s legal woes. He added it has nothing to do with Trump, who most of his clients “love.”

“All of them are almost unified in their position of hating f***ing Rudy,” Richman said. “I don’t want to say the language, but they really ripped Rudy a new a**hole.”


Richman — who I know — represented a cavalcade of mobsters. Among them: Lucchese family boss Carmine “Mr. Gribbs” Tramunti and whacked Bonnano capo Dominick “Big Trin” Trinchera.

Former Gambino boss John Gotti Jr.’s mouthpiece, Jeffrey Lichtman, agreed.


“All of my clients who had the misfortune of being prosecuted by him are laughing now,” Lichtman told the outlet. “As am I. I’m thrilled that Rudy will now experience what it feels like to be on the wrong end of a RICO prosecution — with a mandatory five years in prison facing him.”


The Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act was passed into law in 1970 as a doomsday weapon against organized crime. But until Giuliani came along, no one quite knew how to use it.

While the rounders on the bottom of the power structure took the pinch, the bosses usually got away unscathed. RICO — and Giuliani — changed that.

The law wasn’t created just for denizens of the criminal milieu. It also hit Wall Street inside traders and other white-collar crooks.


“It’s not just an ironic result but it’s a just result. He was a horribly dishonest prosecutor and the wheel of karma is about to crush him,” Lichtman said.

Lawyer Ron Kuby, who repped Gambino associate Stephen “Sigmund the Sea Monster” Sergio, also found Giuliani’s dilemma ironic.

“It is just delightful to watch the guy who expanded RICO prosecutions well beyond their original intent, and did so grasping for the biggest headlines, to watch him be indicted by the very law that he championed,” Kuby said, adding it was a “sad day in America” but he couldn’t stop laughing.

On Tuesday, the former New York City mayor lashed out at the Georgia prosecution.

“This is not meant for election disputes. I mean, this is ridiculous what she’s doing,” Giuliani said.

Back in New York, the boys are gathering in their social clubs and no doubt, raising an espresso at the old Sicilian missive that revenge, is indeed, a dish best served cold.

bhunter@postmedia.com

@HunterTOSun
 

spaminator

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Chicago-area woman charged with emailing threats to shoot Trump and his son
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Michael Tarm
Published Aug 21, 2023 • 1 minute read

CHICAGO — Federal agents arrested a Chicago-area woman Monday on a complaint accusing her of sending emails threatening to shoot former President Donald Trump and his son Barron, according to federal prosecutors and a newly unsealed criminal complaint.


Tracy Marie Fiorenza, 41, was arrested Monday morning on a charge of transmitting threats to kill or injure, according to the U.S. attorney’s office in Chicago. The case was filed earlier this month in U.S. District Court in southern Florida but was only unsealed this week.


“I will state that I will shoot Donald Trump Sr. AND Barron Trump straight in the face at any opportunity I get!,” Fiorenza said in a May 21 email to the head of an educational institution in the Palm Beach, Florida, area, according to an affidavit accompanying the complaint.

Donald Trump’s primary residence is in Palm Beach.

Fiorenza allegedly wrote a similar email on June 5, saying she would “slam a bullet” into Barron Trump “with his father IN SELF DEFENSE!,” according to the affidavit submitted by a U.S. Secret Service agent.


Neither the headmaster nor the school where the emails were allegedly sent was named in the charging documents.

It wasn’t immediately clear if Fiorenza had an attorney who could speak on her behalf.

Fiorenza was expected to make an initial court appearance in Chicago Monday and could eventually be transferred to the district court in Florida to answer the charges.

Agents interviewed Fiorenza at the agency’s Chicago field on June 14 — during which she was shown copies of the emails, according to the affidavit.

The affidavit says Fiorenza lives in Plainfield, Illinois, a southwest Chicago suburb.
 

spaminator

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Witness in Trump’s classified documents case retracted 'false testimony'
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Eric Tucker
Published Aug 22, 2023 • 2 minute read

WASHINGTON — A witness in the criminal case against Donald Trump over the hoarding of classified documents retracted “prior false testimony” after switching lawyers last month and provided new information that implicated the former president, the Justice Department said Tuesday.


The new information from the witness, a Trump staffer identified only as the director of information technology at Mar-a-Lago, was presented to prosecutors weeks before special counsel Jack Smith secured an updated indictment accusing Trump and two others in a plot to delete surveillance video at the Florida property.


Prosecutors said in a court filing Tuesday that the witness told a grand jury in Washington in March that he could not recall any conversations about the security footage.



But in July, after being advised by prosecutors that he was a target of the investigation and after being advised that his lawyer might have a conflict of interest because of his representation of others in the probe, the witness received a new attorney from the federal defender’s office and provided the Justice Department with information that helped form the basis of the revised indictment against Trump, his valet Walt Nauta and a third defendant, Carlos De Oliveira, the court filing says.


Prosecutors described the witness interaction in a filing that seeks a hearing in Florida about potential conflicts of interest involving the defence lawyer, Stanley Woodward, who also represents Nauta. Woodward declined to comment when reached by The Associated Press. They said that encounter helps explain why they continued to use a grand jury in Washington to investigate potential false statements in that district even after they had secured an indictment in Florida, where Mar-a-Lago is located.

“The target letter to Trump Employee 4 crystallized a conflict of interest arising from Mr. Woodward’s concurrent representation of Trump Employee 4 and Nauta,” prosecutors wrote.

“Advising Trump Employee 4 to correct his sworn testimony would result in testimony incriminating Mr. Woodward’s other client, Nauta; but permitting Trump Employee 4’s false testimony to stand uncorrected would leave Trump Employee 4 exposed to criminal charges for perjury.”

A trial has been set for May 20, 2024, in the classified documents case. Trump has pleaded not guilty and denied any wrongdoing.

Trump is facing another prosecution by Smith over efforts to overturn the results of the 2020 presidential election, as well as a criminal case in Georgia over attempts to subvert that state’s vote and another in New York in connection to hush money payments to a porn actor.
 

pgs

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Witness in Trump’s classified documents case retracted 'false testimony'
Author of the article:Associated Press
Associated Press
Eric Tucker
Published Aug 22, 2023 • 2 minute read

WASHINGTON — A witness in the criminal case against Donald Trump over the hoarding of classified documents retracted “prior false testimony” after switching lawyers last month and provided new information that implicated the former president, the Justice Department said Tuesday.


The new information from the witness, a Trump staffer identified only as the director of information technology at Mar-a-Lago, was presented to prosecutors weeks before special counsel Jack Smith secured an updated indictment accusing Trump and two others in a plot to delete surveillance video at the Florida property.


Prosecutors said in a court filing Tuesday that the witness told a grand jury in Washington in March that he could not recall any conversations about the security footage.



But in July, after being advised by prosecutors that he was a target of the investigation and after being advised that his lawyer might have a conflict of interest because of his representation of others in the probe, the witness received a new attorney from the federal defender’s office and provided the Justice Department with information that helped form the basis of the revised indictment against Trump, his valet Walt Nauta and a third defendant, Carlos De Oliveira, the court filing says.


Prosecutors described the witness interaction in a filing that seeks a hearing in Florida about potential conflicts of interest involving the defence lawyer, Stanley Woodward, who also represents Nauta. Woodward declined to comment when reached by The Associated Press. They said that encounter helps explain why they continued to use a grand jury in Washington to investigate potential false statements in that district even after they had secured an indictment in Florida, where Mar-a-Lago is located.

“The target letter to Trump Employee 4 crystallized a conflict of interest arising from Mr. Woodward’s concurrent representation of Trump Employee 4 and Nauta,” prosecutors wrote.

“Advising Trump Employee 4 to correct his sworn testimony would result in testimony incriminating Mr. Woodward’s other client, Nauta; but permitting Trump Employee 4’s false testimony to stand uncorrected would leave Trump Employee 4 exposed to criminal charges for perjury.”

A trial has been set for May 20, 2024, in the classified documents case. Trump has pleaded not guilty and denied any wrongdoing.

Trump is facing another prosecution by Smith over efforts to overturn the results of the 2020 presidential election, as well as a criminal case in Georgia over attempts to subvert that state’s vote and another in New York in connection to hush money payments to a porn actor.
Another smoking gun , what is that 300 . We have him this time for sure .
 
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