Donald Trump Announces 2016 White House Bid

Danbones

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Sep 23, 2015
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Clubs are things kweer commies beat children with...because they want union.
 

Danbones

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“Which brings me to your blatant attempt at free media attention to distract from your dismal record as a union,” Trump added. “Your organization has done little for its members, and nothing for me—besides collecting dues and promoting dangerous un-American policies and ideas—as evident by your massive unemployment rates and lawsuits from celebrated actors, who even recorded a video asking, ‘Why isn’t the union fighting for me?’”

Poor beardie: The very definition of fakenews.
 

Danbones

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Ah yes...A bunch of bad actors...
:)

Noun[edit]​

bad actor (plural bad actors)
  1. (idiomatic, law) Individual or entity with the prior criminal conviction, or who has been sanctioned by the court or regulator.
  2. (idiomatic) Ill-intentioned, mean, ill-tempered person.
  3. Used other than figuratively or idiomatically: see bad,‎ actor.

Synonyms[edit]​

Usage notes[edit]​

In the legal sense "bad actor" is also used in financial regulations, ex. not allowing such people or companies to participate in certain regulated processes, or to take advantage of certain privileges. Often used as opposed to "an upstanding citizen".

Like a wrestler with fake boobs on. or...



Kevin Spacey.
 

spaminator

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it will be interesting to see what the upcoming vote will be that determines if trump can run again in 2024. 🗳️ ☑️
 

spaminator

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Atlantic City's crumbling Trump Plaza hotel demolished
Author of the article:
Reuters
Reuters
Andrew Hofstetter
Publishing date:
Feb 17, 2021 • 18 hours ago • 1 minute read
The Trump Plaza Casino collapses after a controlled demolition in Atlantic City, N.J., Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2021. Photo by Peter Ackerman / Courier-Post /USA Today Network via REUTERS
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ATLANTIC CITY — Crowds cheered as the Trump Plaza Hotel and Casino in Atlantic City was demolished on Wednesday, the oceanfront eyesore bearing the name of the former U.S. president disappearing in a cascading collapse.

Trump, a Republican who was a real estate developer before moving to the White House, opened the hotel and oceanside casino in 1984 but lost control of the property in a 2009 bankruptcy.

A rapid series of explosive dynamite booms heralded the deliberate destruction of the blighted skeletal building, which dissolved into a pile of rubble that sent enormous brown clouds swirling around surrounding structures in the Jersey Shore resort city known for gambling, beaches and its boardwalk.

It took the decrepit building about seven seconds to completely collapse onto the sand, vanishing from the boardwalk skyline shortly after 9 a.m. local time.

Air horn blasts, whistling and cheers erupted as crowds of several hundred people, most of them wearing masks to guard against the spread of COVID-19, milled around pickup trucks parked nearby to watch the spectacle.
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Onlookers were charged $10 for a prime viewing spot in an area that was recently used as a food distribution site for the struggling city of 38,000 people.

His former hotel came down in the wake of Trump becoming the first president in U.S. history to be impeached twice. Last week, the Senate acquitted Trump of inciting a mob that stormed the Capitol on Jan. 6.
A man walks past the debris pile for the Trump Plaza Casino that was demolished by implosion in Atlantic City, N.J., Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2021. Photo by Carlo Allegri /REUTERS

It was Atlantic City’s tenth casino and, in addition to gambling, hosted heavyweight boxing prize fights.

Trump’s name remained on the business as part of a licence agreement until 2014, when the casino closed as Atlantic City struggled as a gambling resort, with growing competition in other states. Billionaire investor Carl C. Icahn acquired it out of bankruptcy in 2016.
 

spaminator

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Pro-Trump women's group cannot paint mural on NYC streets, judge rules
Author of the article:
Reuters
Reuters
Jonathan Stempel
Publishing date:
Feb 18, 2021 • 19 hours ago • 1 minute read
People gather around the newly painted "Black Lives Matter" mural along 5th Avenue outside Trump Tower in New York July 9, 2020. Photo by Mike Segar /REUTERS
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NEW YORK — A conservative women’s group cannot paint its own mural on New York City streets even after Mayor Bill de Blasio allowed a yellow “Black Lives Matter” mural to be painted outside Trump Tower, a federal judge in Manhattan ruled on Thursday.

U.S. District Judge Lorna Schofield said Women for America First, a supporter of Republican former President Donald Trump, did not show that the city violated its First Amendment rights in rejected its mural “Engaging, Inspiring and Empowering Women to Make a Difference!”

The judge said the city may apply reasonable, viewpoint-neutral restrictions to street surfaces, which are typically reserved for signage to promote traffic safety and are not “message boards for private expression.”

Schofield also refused to block the city from painting its own murals, saying it could pose “serious, potentially unwarranted limitations” on government communications with the public and was therefore not in the public interest.
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“We are disappointed in this outcome and we will take a very hard look at the decision,” Ronald Coleman, a lawyer for the plaintiff, said in an email.

Women for America First had proposed painting its mural on Fifth Avenue, where Trump Tower is located.

It also proposed alternative locations including City Hall Park, on 42nd Street near Times Square, and on the FDR Drive near Gracie Mansion, the mayor’s official residence.

New York City “has a right to select the views that it wants to express,” Diana Murray, senior counsel in its law department, said in an email. “The decision to deny plaintiff’s application was consistent with longstanding Supreme Court precedent.”

De Blasio, a Democrat, tweeted when the “Black Lives Matter” mural was painted: “Our city isn’t just painting the words on Fifth Avenue. We’re committed to the meaning of the message.”
 

spaminator

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Trump may soon have to answer rape allegations under oath
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Linda So
Publishing date:Feb 23, 2021 • 3 hours ago • 5 minute read

In this file photo taken Jan. 20, 2021, outgoing U.S. President Donald Trump boards Marine One at the White House in Washington, D.C. PHOTO BY MANDEL NGAN /AFP via Getty Images
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During a December visit to New York City, writer E. Jean Carroll says she went shopping with a fashion consultant to find the “best outfit” for one of the most important days of her life – when she’ll sit face-to-face with the man she accuses of raping her decades ago, former President Donald Trump.

The author and journalist hopes that day will come this year. Her lawyers are seeking to depose Trump in a defamation lawsuit that Carroll filed against the former president in November 2019 after he denied her accusation that he raped her at a Manhattan department store in the mid-1990s. Trump said he never knew Carroll and accused her of lying to sell her new book, adding: “She’s not my type.”


She plans to be there if Trump is deposed.

“I am living for the moment to walk into that room to sit across the table from him,” Carroll told Reuters in an interview. “I think of it everyday.”

Carroll, 77, a former Elle magazine columnist, seeks unspecified damages in her lawsuit and a retraction of Trump’s statements. It is one of two defamation cases involving sexual misconduct allegations against Trump that could move forward faster now that he has left the presidency. While in office, Trump’s lawyers delayed the case in part by arguing that the pressing duties of his office made responding to civil lawsuits impossible.

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“The only barrier to proceeding with the civil suits was that he’s the president,” said Jennifer Rodgers, a former federal prosecutor and now an adjunct professor of clinical law at the New York University School of Law.

“I think there will be a sense among the judges that it’s time to get a move on in these cases,” said Roberta Kaplan, Carroll’s attorney.

An attorney for Trump and another representative of the former president did not respond to requests for comment.

Trump faces a similar defamation lawsuit from Summer Zervos, a former contestant on his reality television show “The Apprentice.” In 2016, Zervos accused Trump of sexual misconduct, saying that he kissed her against her will at a 2007 meeting in New York and later groped her at a California hotel as the two met to discuss job opportunities.

Trump denied the allegations and called Zervos a liar, prompting her to sue him for defamation in 2017, seeking damages and a retraction. Trump tried unsuccessfully to have the case dismissed, arguing that, as president, he was immune from suits filed in state courts. His lawyers appealed to the New York Court of Appeals, which is still considering the case. Zervos filed a motion in early February asking the court to resume the case now that Trump’s no longer president.


Zervos and Carroll are among more than two dozen women who have publicly accused Trump of sexual misconduct that they say occurred in the years before he became president. Other accusers include a former model who claims Trump sexually assaulted her at the 1997 U.S. Open tennis tournament; a former Miss Universe pageant contestant who said Trump groped her in 2006; and a reporter who alleges Trump forcibly kissed her without her consent in 2005 at his Mar-a-Lago resort.

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Trump has denied the allegations and called them politically motivated.

In September, after several unsuccessful attempts by Trump’s lawyers to get Carroll’s case dismissed or delayed, U.S. Justice Department officials under his administration took the unusual step of asking that the government be substituted for Trump as the defendant in the case. Justice Department lawyers argued that Trump, like any typical government employee, is entitled under federal law to immunity from civil lawsuits when performing his job. They argued that he was acting in his capacity as president when he said Carroll was lying.

Legal experts said it was unprecedented for the Justice Department to defend a president for conduct before he took office. When Judge Lewis Kaplan of the Federal District Court in Manhattan rejected that argument, the Justice Department appealed. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit has yet to rule on it.

It’s yet to be seen whether Justice Department officials under President Joe Biden, who took office last month, will continue to defend the case on Trump’s behalf. The White House and the Justice Department declined to comment.

If the appeals court upholds Judge Kaplan’s decision, it would likely clear the way for Trump to be deposed by Carroll’s lawyers.

Carroll’s lawyers are also seeking a DNA sample from Trump. Carroll says she still has the dress she was wearing when Trump allegedly attacked her.

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“I hung it in my closet,” she said.

Carroll said she randomly crossed paths with Trump in the Bergdorf Goodman’s store in the mid-1990s. Carroll, who hosted a TV talk show at the time, said Trump recognized her. The two chatted, she said. Trump asked her to pick out a gift for an unidentified woman, and they eventually ended up in the lingerie department. After asking her to try on a body suit, Trump closed the door in a dressing room, pinned her against a wall, unzipped his pants and sexually assaulted her, according to the complaint.

Carroll said she told two friends about the alleged attack shortly after it happened, but did not report Trump to police, fearing retribution from the wealthy and well-connected businessman. Decades later, Carroll went public with her story in a June 2019 New York magazine article, adapted from a new book, “What Do We Need Men For? A Modest Proposal.”

She said she was inspired to recount the incident by the #MeToo movement, which emboldened women to share their experiences of sexual assault and harassment. In photos shot for that story, Carroll, at the request of the magazine’s photography director, wore the same black Donna Karan dress that she said she had worn on the day that Trump allegedly assaulted her.

When Carroll filed her lawsuit later in 2019, her lawyer, Kaplan, had a guard escort her to retrieve the dress from her closet for forensic testing. An analysis concluded no semen was found on the dress, but the DNA of an unidentified male was detected on the shoulder and sleeves, according to the Jan. 8, 2020 lab report, which was reviewed by Reuters.

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If the dress does contain traces of Trump’s DNA, it would not prove his guilt. But a match could be used as evidence that he had contact with the dress and to help disprove his claims that he never met Carroll, according to two forensic experts not involved in the case.

“How his DNA got on that dress would be the argument,” said Monte Miller, a biochemist who runs a DNA analysis consultancy and previously worked at the Texas Department of Public Safety’s State Crime Laboratory. “It’s for the attorneys and the courts and everybody else to argue about why it’s there and how it got there.”

Carroll said she’s confident the DNA on the dress belongs to Trump and wants her day in court. She said she now sleeps with a gun next to her bed because she has received death threats since publicly accusing Trump.

“This defamation suit is not about me,” said Carroll, who meets regularly with other women who have accused Trump of sexual misconduct. It’s about every woman “who can’t speak up.”
 

spaminator

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New York prosecutors digging into Trump's tax, financial records
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Karen Freifeld
Publishing date:Feb 25, 2021 • 21 hours ago • 2 minute read • comment bubble51 Comments
U.S. President Donald Trump waves as he arrives at Palm Beach International Airport in West Palm Beach, Florida, U.S., January 20, 2021.
U.S. President Donald Trump waves as he arrives at Palm Beach International Airport in West Palm Beach, Florida, U.S., January 20, 2021. PHOTO BY CARLOS BARRIA /REUTERS
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After a lengthy court battle, the Manhattan District Attorney is in possession of Donald Trump’s tax returns and other financial records as part of a criminal investigation into the former president and his family-run Trump Organization, a spokesman for the office confirmed on Thursday.

The New York prosecutor’s office obtained the voluminous records on Monday, the same day the U.S. Supreme Court rejected Trump’s latest attempt to keep his longtime accounting firm, Mazars USA, from turning over the records.


Danny Frost, a spokesman for Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance, confirmed the office’s receipt of the documents, which came some 18 months after a subpoena was issued for them.

The records, which include eight years of tax returns, could boost the district attorney’s investigation into the Trump Organization.

Unlike all other recent U.S. presidents, Trump refused to make his tax returns public. The data could provide details on his wealth and the activities of the family-run real-estate company.

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A spokesman for Mazars USA did not immediately respond to a request for comment. On Monday, after the Supreme Court ruling, Trump issued a statement calling Vance’s investigation part of “the greatest political Witch Hunt in the history of our country.”

Vance subpoenaed Mazars in 2019 seeking Trump’s corporate and personal tax returns from 2011 to 2018. Trump’s lawyers sued to block the subpoena, arguing that a sitting president has absolute immunity from state criminal investigations.

The Supreme Court in July rejected those arguments but said Trump could raise other objections. Trump’s lawyers then told lower courts the subpoena was overly broad and amounted to political harassment but the lower courts rejected those claims last year.

Vance’s investigation initially focused on hush money paid by former Trump lawyer Michael Cohen before the 2016 election to adult-film actress Stormy Daniels and former Playboy model Karen McDougal. The two women said they had sexual encounters with Trump, which he denied.

In court filings, Vance later suggested the probe had broadened and could focus on potential bank, tax and insurance fraud, as well as falsification of business records.

Vance’s receipt of the documents does not mean they will become public.

The New York Times obtained some of the records and reported last year that Trump had paid $750 in federal income taxes in both 2016 and 2017, and no income taxes in 10 of the prior 15 years. Trump has disputed the Times report.
 

spaminator

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Tim Allen 'liked' that Donald Trump 'pissed people off'
Author of the article:Mark Daniell
Publishing date:Mar 03, 2021 • 14 hours ago • 3 minute read • comment bubble45 Comments
Tim Allen sits on stage ahead of the 77th Annual Golden Globe Awards nominations announcements at the Beverly Hilton hotel on Dec. 9, 2019.
Tim Allen sits on stage ahead of the 77th Annual Golden Globe Awards nominations announcements at the Beverly Hilton hotel on Dec. 9, 2019. PHOTO BY ROBYN BECK /Getty Images
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Tim Allen is a rare breed in Hollywood that you hear almost nothing about: he’s a conservative among a sea of liberals.

But in a recent episode of Marc Maron’s WTF podcast, the Last Man Standing star opened up on his political views and being drawn to Donald Trump because the divisive former president didn’t mind ruffling some feathers.


“Once I realized that the last president pissed people off, I kind of liked that,” Allen said according to Fox News.

Allen became a conservative, he said, because he didn’t like the idea of not knowing how his taxes were being spent.


“Once I started making money, I had this silent partner (the government) that took almost half my money and never gave me anything for it. That was the taxes. I never liked taxes,” Allen said. “I’m a conservative person with money. That’s it.”

Allen’s family comedy Last Man Standing was axed by ABC before being revived by Fox. The cancellation came after the actor-comedian likened being a Republican in Hollywood to living in 1930s Germany.

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“You gotta be real careful around here,” he said during an appearance on Jimmy Kimmel Live! in 2017. “You get beat up if you don’t believe what everybody else believes. This is like ’30s Germany.”


Allen told Maron that he managed to avoid controversy because he doesn’t “preach” his beliefs.

“What I’ve done is just not joined into — as I call it — the ‘we culture.’ I’m not telling anybody else how to live. I don’t like that. ‘We should do this,’ ‘We should do that,'” the 67-year-old said.

Once he realized Trump had riled so many of his fellow actors, Allen “didn’t join in the lynching crowd.”

“It was fun to just not say anything,” he said.

In a 2018 interview with Entertainment Weekly, Allen referred to himself as an “anarchist.”

“I’m for responsible government that actually does what we pay them to do. I’ve worked different jobs and I’ve had a colourful past and I pay a lot in taxes. I wish we got more for our money,” the Home Improvement star told the mag. “I always thought it would be funny if I had a little menu on my tax returns where I could tell them where my money would go.”

He also defended Trump in that same interview, even though he had openly supported John Kasich.

“My perception is. ‘Let’s see what he gets done.’ Let’s stop banging on the pilot’s door and trying to pull the guy out of his seat while he’s still flying. You might not like how he’s flying the plane, but let’s let him land it.”

But Allen was also critical of the former president following the attacks at the Capitol on Jan. 6 and said the breach by MAGA rioters pushed many conservatives back into the closet.

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“When I was watching that, I felt that the president should have been a stand-up guy and go there with his security and say, ‘Hey, come on. No, no, no, no,'” Allen said.

Allen’s comments come after comedian Bill Burr defended his Mandalorian co-star Gina Carano for comparing life as a conservative to that of a Jew in Nazi Germany on social media.

mdaniell@postmedia.com
 

Serryah

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Tim Allen 'liked' that Donald Trump 'pissed people off'
Author of the article:Mark Daniell
Publishing date:Mar 03, 2021 • 14 hours ago • 3 minute read • comment bubble45 Comments
Tim Allen sits on stage ahead of the 77th Annual Golden Globe Awards nominations announcements at the Beverly Hilton hotel on Dec. 9, 2019.
Tim Allen sits on stage ahead of the 77th Annual Golden Globe Awards nominations announcements at the Beverly Hilton hotel on Dec. 9, 2019. PHOTO BY ROBYN BECK /Getty Images
Article content
Tim Allen is a rare breed in Hollywood that you hear almost nothing about: he’s a conservative among a sea of liberals.

But in a recent episode of Marc Maron’s WTF podcast, the Last Man Standing star opened up on his political views and being drawn to Donald Trump because the divisive former president didn’t mind ruffling some feathers.


“Once I realized that the last president pissed people off, I kind of liked that,” Allen said according to Fox News.

Allen became a conservative, he said, because he didn’t like the idea of not knowing how his taxes were being spent.


“Once I started making money, I had this silent partner (the government) that took almost half my money and never gave me anything for it. That was the taxes. I never liked taxes,” Allen said. “I’m a conservative person with money. That’s it.”

Allen’s family comedy Last Man Standing was axed by ABC before being revived by Fox. The cancellation came after the actor-comedian likened being a Republican in Hollywood to living in 1930s Germany.

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“You gotta be real careful around here,” he said during an appearance on Jimmy Kimmel Live! in 2017. “You get beat up if you don’t believe what everybody else believes. This is like ’30s Germany.”


Allen told Maron that he managed to avoid controversy because he doesn’t “preach” his beliefs.

“What I’ve done is just not joined into — as I call it — the ‘we culture.’ I’m not telling anybody else how to live. I don’t like that. ‘We should do this,’ ‘We should do that,'” the 67-year-old said.

Once he realized Trump had riled so many of his fellow actors, Allen “didn’t join in the lynching crowd.”

“It was fun to just not say anything,” he said.

In a 2018 interview with Entertainment Weekly, Allen referred to himself as an “anarchist.”

“I’m for responsible government that actually does what we pay them to do. I’ve worked different jobs and I’ve had a colourful past and I pay a lot in taxes. I wish we got more for our money,” the Home Improvement star told the mag. “I always thought it would be funny if I had a little menu on my tax returns where I could tell them where my money would go.”

He also defended Trump in that same interview, even though he had openly supported John Kasich.

“My perception is. ‘Let’s see what he gets done.’ Let’s stop banging on the pilot’s door and trying to pull the guy out of his seat while he’s still flying. You might not like how he’s flying the plane, but let’s let him land it.”

But Allen was also critical of the former president following the attacks at the Capitol on Jan. 6 and said the breach by MAGA rioters pushed many conservatives back into the closet.

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“When I was watching that, I felt that the president should have been a stand-up guy and go there with his security and say, ‘Hey, come on. No, no, no, no,'” Allen said.

Allen’s comments come after comedian Bill Burr defended his Mandalorian co-star Gina Carano for comparing life as a conservative to that of a Jew in Nazi Germany on social media.

mdaniell@postmedia.com

So while I personally am all for anyone - celebs included - to voice their opinions about things, even politics, usually the right goes into ape shit mode when it happens.

When will the right go ape on Tim for voicing his political views, do you think?
 

pgs

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So while I personally am all for anyone - celebs included - to voice their opinions about things, even politics, usually the right goes into ape shit mode when it happens.

When will the right go ape on Tim for voicing his political views, do you think?
He is as free to voice his opinion as anyone .
 

spaminator

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Trump demands 3 Republican groups stop raising money off his name
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Publishing date:Mar 06, 2021 • 16 hours ago • 1 minute read • comment bubbleJoin the conversation
Former U.S. President Donald Trump speaks at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Orlando, Fla., Feb. 28, 2021.
Former U.S. President Donald Trump speaks at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Orlando, Fla., Feb. 28, 2021. PHOTO BY OCTAVIO JONES /REUTERS
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WASHINGTON — Former President Donald Trump has clashed again with his Republican Party, demanding that three Republican groups stop using his name and likeness for fundraising, a Trump adviser said on Saturday.

The adviser, confirming a report in Politico, said lawyers for Trump on Friday had sent cease-and-desist letters to the Republican National Committee, National Republican Congressional Campaign and National Republican Senate Campaign, asking them to stop using his name and likeness on fundraising emails and merchandise.


The adviser said Trump is sensitive to the use of his name and likeness for branding purposes and was irked that the three groups have supported Republican lawmakers who joined Democrats in voting to impeach him over the Jan. 6 storming of the U.S. Capitol by pro-Trump protesters.

Trump is using his Save America SuperPAC to raise money in part to help hand-picked Republican candidates in the 2022 congressional elections. Some of them are expected to challenge Republican incumbents.

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A civil war has erupted within the Republican Party, with establishment figures such as Senate minority leader Mitch McConnell eager to put Trump in the rearview mirror, and others, like Trump ally Senator Lindsey Graham, believing the party’s future depends on the energy of the pro-Trump base.

Trump has waged a war of words with establishment Republicans, some of whom he feels betrayed him by joining Democrats in impeaching him.

Trump, now living at his Mar-a-Lago club in Palm Beach, Florida, dangled the possibility of running for president again in 2024 when he addressed a conference of conservatives last Sunday.


In that speech, he singled out Republicans Senators Mitt Romney and Pat Toomey and House lawmakers Liz Cheney and Adam Kinzinger, suggesting he would support candidates who opposed them in Republican primaries. Still, Trump has committed to helping Republicans try to win control of the U.S. House of Representatives and the Senate in 2022 congressional elections that will be a first referendum on the leadership of Democratic President Joe Biden.
 

spaminator

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Accountant faces pressure to turn on Trump in criminal probe
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
Joseph Tanfani and Jason Szep
Publishing date:Mar 07, 2021 • 1 day ago • 4 minute read • comment bubbleJoin the conversation
Donald Trump and his son Donald, Jr., arrive for a press conference at Trump Tower in New York, as Allen Weisselberg (middle), chief financial officer of The Trump, looks on.
Donald Trump and his son Donald, Jr., arrive for a press conference at Trump Tower in New York, as Allen Weisselberg (middle), chief financial officer of The Trump, looks on. PHOTO BY TIMOTHY A. CLARY /AFP/Getty Images
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When lawyers asked Donald Trump more than a decade ago to identify who estimated values on some of his signature properties, he shrugged and pointed to his longtime accountant, Allen Weisselberg.

“I think ultimately probably Mr. Weisselberg,” he said, testifying in 2007 in a defamation lawsuit he brought against a journalist, a case that hinged on whether Trump had inflated the value of his business empire. “I never got too much involved, other than I would give my opinion.”


A judge dismissed that suit, but Trump’s comments illustrate the challenges now facing Weisselberg, 73, as he comes under scrutiny in Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance’s investigation into whether the former U.S. president and his Trump Organization committed financial crimes.

Few people have been as deeply involved in Trump’s finances as Weisselberg, a trusted figure in Trump’s family business who began working for Trump’s father, Fred, in 1973 at the company’s Brooklyn office, paying bills and tracking the rental payments from apartment towers.

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Legal experts and a source familiar with the criminal investigation say prosecutors’ apparent goal is to convince Weisselberg to cooperate with the probe into Trump’s dealings.


“They want him to turn,” said the person familiar with the investigation.

A spokesman for Vance declined to comment. Lawyers for Weisselberg and Trump did not respond to requests for comment.

The Manhattan district attorney said in an August filing that the office is investigating “possibly extensive and protracted criminal conduct” at the Trump Organization, though he has not fully disclosed the scope of the probe. In a September filing, he said “mountainous” misconduct allegations could justify a grand jury probe into possible tax fraud, insurance fraud and falsifying business records.

Vance’s office and a separate civil probe by New York Attorney General Letitia James are both examining whether Trump misrepresented the value of his assets for tax benefits, among other potential violations.

Weisselberg’s unique position in the Trump Organization puts him among a small number of people who could provide prosecutors with crucial evidence of intent to commit fraud. Legal experts say Trump may try to put distance between himself and any controversial valuations of his properties and businesses by citing Weisselberg’s role as financial gatekeeper, as he did in the 2007 defamation case.

“It may very well be that Weisselberg will be Trump’s defense in a criminal case,” said Michael Bachner, a defense attorney who once worked as a prosecutor with Vance in the Manhattan office.

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If Trump argues that he merely relied on the advice of his accountants and lawyers, Weisselberg could be in the position of having to take the heat himself for any potentially fraudulent dealings, Bachner said – unless the accountant makes a deal with prosecutors and implicates Trump.

“If I’m Trump, I’ve got to be nervous about this,” he said.

The source familiar with the investigation said that, in addition to scrutinizing Weisselberg, prosecutors also asked questions about his sons, who also had connections with Trump: Jack Weisselberg, a director at Ladder Capital – a real estate investment firm that’s been a creditor for four Trump properties – and Barry Weisselberg, who managed skating rinks under Trump contracts with New York City.

Ladder Capital did not respond to requests for comment. Other Ladder executives, but not Jack Weisselberg, appear on loan documents involving Trump.

Jack and Barry Weisselberg did not respond to requests for comment.

On March 1, after the U.S. Supreme Court denied Trump’s last-ditch effort to keep his tax records private, Vance’s office obtained millions of pages of records on Trump’s taxes and finances. His office has also added a prosecutor experienced in organized crime and corruption, Mark Pomerantz, to the Trump investigation team, and interviewed staff at Ladder Capital.

As the Trump Organization’s chief financial officer and executive vice president, Weisselberg developed a unique position of trust with Trump, according to interviews with four former Trump Organization officials. The accountant handled Trump’s personal finances as well as the company’s most sensitive financial information, the officials said.

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Barbara Res, Trump’s former construction manager, said Weisselberg was part of the Trump family’s inner circle, but he kept an unassuming profile. “He was the only one of the executives who would refer to Donald as Mr. Trump,” she said. “He was that kind of guy.”

Res said Trump trusted Weisselberg as a pair of eyes to make sure Trump’s other accountants and lawyers were doing their jobs. “Allen wouldn’t go outside the company,” she said. “Allen wouldn’t talk; Allen could be trusted to keep things quiet.”

When Trump’s former lawyer and fixer, Michael Cohen, arranged for a hush-money payment to porn actress Stormy Daniels, Weisselberg was involved in cutting the checks, Cohen testified in a February 2019 hearing held by a committee of the U.S. House of Representatives. Weisselberg obtained limited immunity from federal prosecutors to provide information in the investigation that targeted Cohen; he was not charged with wrongdoing. Cohen pleaded guilty to tax evasion and campaign finance violations.

Vance could seek a court order granting him access to Weisselberg’s testimony in the federal case against Cohen, legal experts said.

During the 2019 committee hearing, Cohen identified Weisselberg as one of the Trump executives who knew that Trump inflated assets in statements to insurance companies for the purpose of reducing premiums. In response to questions from Democratic Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Cohen said he could not confirm a New York Times report on whether Trump under-reported values on inherited real estate to reduce his taxes.

“Who would know the answers to those questions?” she asked.

“Allen Weisselberg,” Cohen said.
 

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Republican Party says it will continue to use Trump name in fundraising appeals
Author of the article:Reuters
Reuters
James Oliphant
Publishing date:Mar 09, 2021 • 19 hours ago • 1 minute read • comment bubbleJoin the conversation
Former U.S. President Donald Trump speaks at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Orlando, Florida, U.S. February 28, 2021.
Former U.S. President Donald Trump speaks at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Orlando, Florida, U.S. February 28, 2021. PHOTO BY JOE SKIPPER /REUTERS
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WASHINGTON — The Republican Party intends to keep using former President Donald Trump’s name in fundraising pitches and other materials, a lawyer for the party said on Monday, despite a cease-and-desist letter from Trump last week.

The letter sent by lawyers for Trump on Friday to the Republican National Committee, National Republican Congressional Campaign and National Republican Senate Campaign had ramped up tension between the two camps as Trump seeks to preserve his political viability post-election.


A Trump adviser said on Saturday that Trump was sensitive to the use of his name and likeness for branding purposes and was irked the three groups have supported Republican lawmakers who joined Democrats in voting to impeach him over the Jan. 6 storming of the U.S. Capitol by pro-Trump protesters.

In a response letter, the Republican National Committee said that Trump “reaffirmed” to RNC Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel over the weekend that he approves of the party’s current use of his name, wrote Justin Riemer, the RNC’s top lawyer.

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The party also argued it had “every right to refer to public figures as it engages in core, First Amendment-protected political speech.”

The letter indicated Trump would participate in the party’s donor retreat scheduled for next month in Palm Beach, Florida, which is home to Trump’s Mar-a-Lago resort.

A representative for Trump did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the letter.

In an effort separate from the Republican Party, Trump is using his Save America SuperPAC to raise money in part to help handpicked Republican candidates in the 2022 congressional elections. Some of them are expected to challenge Republican incumbents whom Trump considers disloyal.


Still, Trump has committed to helping Republicans try to win back control of the U.S. House of Representatives and the Senate in the 2022 elections that will be an early referendum on the leadership of Democratic President Joe Biden.
 

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CNN ratings plummet since Trump left office
Author of the article:postmedia News
Publishing date:Mar 19, 2021 • 2 hours ago • 1 minute read • comment bubbleJoin the conversation
A picture of Donald Trump appears on a CNN television program after the Republican party nominee won the vote from the state of North Carolina at the Hilton Hotel on November 9, 2016 in New York City.
A picture of Donald Trump appears on a CNN television program after the Republican party nominee won the vote from the state of North Carolina at the Hilton Hotel on November 9, 2016 in New York City. PHOTO BY ROBERT NICKELSBERG /Getty Images
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No Trump, no bump.

CNN’s viewership has plummeted since Donald Trump left office on Jan. 20, Fox News is reporting, citing Nielsen Media Research.


The Atlanta-based cable news network lost nearly half of its prime-time audience in a key demographic — 47% of the 25-to-54 age group — from Jan. 21 to March 15 once President Joe Biden took office.

From Nov. 4, the day after the presidential election, through to Inauguration Day on Jan. 20, CNN had an average of 2.5 million primetime viewers.

However, after a viewership bump on Election Day, CNN’s audience in the 8-11 p.m. primetime slot plunged 36% since Jan. 21.

CNN’s ratings also went down 49% to 1.6 million primetime viewers from Jan 20 to March 15, compared to an average of 3.1 million viewers from Dec. 28 to Jan. 20.

As for total day audience numbers, CNN saw a 34% drop, from 1.7 million tuning in Nov. 4-Jan. 20 to 1.1 million since Jan. 21.

CNN was often criticized during his presidency for its negative coverage of Trump.