CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) & Bill C-18

Taxslave2

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Canadian Independent creators have done well with the internet so no government interference was required. But apparently, the MSM don't like it as they've lost business but hey, if you don't put the factual product out there, no one is going to buy it.

They simply need to do their jobs better but alas, the government will support them no matter what so it's Canadians that are going to be screwed. Hopefully, there'll be a "go around" for us to eventually find the news we want. I imagine it'll just take time & we'll be able to defeat it. What do you think?
I think that is the problem. Indies, like True North, have facts, while CBC and its wannabees print what the government tells them to in return for taxpayer money. turdOWE thinks that if he can cancel all the factual news sources, then we will swallow his dogma.
 

Taxslave2

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The saga of content providers v. carriers has been long and weird. Back in the day, providers like ESPN paid cable systems to carry them. Then they got so popular, they started charging cable systems to carry them.

That's the market at work.

Then government gets involved. . .
It seems to me that this whole goat rodeo is backwards. Newspapers should be paying FB and google to link to their sites.Afterall, when you do link to a "news" site, you get a barrage of advertising before you find the article.
 

Taxslave2

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Apt analogy! In the Canadian case, it’ll hit close to home as the ICE Vehicle will no longer be available for sale (new) as of 2035 (I shit you not). It’ll be EV’s or used ICE vehicles from that point forward, and yes, technology can & will change, but that’s in less that twelve years so it better hurry the Hell up already.

Either the Technology or the Global Warming/Changing thing better hurry up, or some combination of the two…’cuz Canada and Winter are real and battery tech just isn’t there yet. Either way, I’m not looking forward to it.
Or we have an election that is not rigged and turdOWE and his band will be gone gone gone. Along with their useless laws.
 

Dixie Cup

Senate Member
Sep 16, 2006
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I think that is the problem. Indies, like True North, have facts, while CBC and its wannabees print what the government tells them to in return for taxpayer money. turdOWE thinks that if he can cancel all the factual news sources, then we will swallow his dogma.
With his latest effort to condemn Canadians to "gov't news only" I can only hope & pray that the indies survive this otherwise it's a loss for Canadians. We need to support our independents.
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
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With his latest effort to condemn Canadians to "gov't news only" I can only hope & pray that the indies survive this otherwise it's a loss for Canadians. We need to support our independents.
We need a counterbalance in the news as we’ve seen in the WE or SNC Lavalin or countless other scandals…that if the only line is the government sanctioned line of information….None of the above would’ve ever been discovered let alone discussed.

whether that counter balance comes from “independents” or “independent from government” new sources, they still need to exist.

Anything different than the official government sanctioned truth would be misinformation or disinformation, and penalties for publishing anything but their version of the truth. That’s Orwellian, but that looks like the direction that this current government is trying to take things in. Yikes.
 

Ron in Regina

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And this story from the CBC this morning:

In a sign negotiations with tech giants Google and Meta over the government's new Online News Act may be at an impasse, the Liberals, the NDP and the Bloc Québécois are expected to present a united front in support of the legislation at a news conference today.

"Canada is standing up to the tech giants for the right reasons," Heritage Minister Pablo Rodriguez said in a media statement. "A free and independent press is fundamental to our democracy."

His office did not say if the government would have anything new to announce at the news conference.

The law compels companies like Google and Meta to pay money to a news organization each time a user accesses a web story through a link on one of their products.

The bill has been pitched as a way to keep news outlets solvent after advertising moved en masse to digital platforms, virtually wiping out a major revenue stream for journalism.

As a news organization, the CBC could see a financial benefit under C-18, which requires the CBC to provide an annual report on any compensation for news it receives from digital operators.


So, in these negotiations, who is negotiating with who??
 

petros

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The bill has been pitched as a way to keep news outlets solvent after advertising moved en masse to digital platforms, virtually wiping out a major revenue stream for journalism.
News was public service provided at a loss by TV until CNN came along.
 
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Taxslave2

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And this story from the CBC this morning:

In a sign negotiations with tech giants Google and Meta over the government's new Online News Act may be at an impasse, the Liberals, the NDP and the Bloc Québécois are expected to present a united front in support of the legislation at a news conference today.

"Canada is standing up to the tech giants for the right reasons," Heritage Minister Pablo Rodriguez said in a media statement. "A free and independent press is fundamental to our democracy."

His office did not say if the government would have anything new to announce at the news conference.

The law compels companies like Google and Meta to pay money to a news organization each time a user accesses a web story through a link on one of their products.

The bill has been pitched as a way to keep news outlets solvent after advertising moved en masse to digital platforms, virtually wiping out a major revenue stream for journalism.

As a news organization, the CBC could see a financial benefit under C-18, which requires the CBC to provide an annual report on any compensation for news it receives from digital operators.


So, in these negotiations, who is negotiating with who??
Seems the clueless government is forgetting that the social media companies don't have to provide news, free or otherwise, to survive.
 
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Ron in Regina

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In further negotiations, the federal government will stop advertising on Meta-owned platforms Facebook and Instagram as the conflict between the company and Ottawa heats up over legislation that would force web giants to share revenues with news publishers. That is all, more or less.

“Facebook has decided to be unreasonable, irresponsible, and started blocking news,” Heritage Minister Pablo Rodriguez told reporters Wednesday flanked by Bloc Québécois MP Martin Champoux and NDP MP Peter Julian…BUT at least they are not a fringe group of racist misogynists with unacceptable views…

Rodriguez said the government was only targeting ads on Meta platforms and not those on Google because the former has consistently refused to negotiate deals to compensate news media companies for the use of their content.

(But the Liberal government’s decision does not extend to the party. Liberal Party of Canada spokesperson Parker Lund said in a statement that the party would continue to advertise on Meta-owned platforms. According to the company’s ad library, the party spent nearly $15,000 on over 1,000 ads in the past month, etc…)
 

petros

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A
In further negotiations, the federal government will stop advertising on Meta-owned platforms Facebook and Instagram as the conflict between the company and Ottawa heats up over legislation that would force web giants to share revenues with news publishers. That is all, more or less.

“Facebook has decided to be unreasonable, irresponsible, and started blocking news,” Heritage Minister Pablo Rodriguez told reporters Wednesday flanked by Bloc Québécois MP Martin Champoux and NDP MP Peter Julian…BUT at least they are not a fringe group of racist misogynists with unacceptable views…

Rodriguez said the government was only targeting ads on Meta platforms and not those on Google because the former has consistently refused to negotiate deals to compensate news media companies for the use of their content.

(But the Liberal government’s decision does not extend to the party. Liberal Party of Canada spokesperson Parker Lund said in a statement that the party would continue to advertise on Meta-owned platforms. According to the company’s ad library, the party spent nearly $15,000 on over 1,000 ads in the past month, etc…)
A septic tan sorts itself.
 

Dixie Cup

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Sep 16, 2006
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And this story from the CBC this morning:

In a sign negotiations with tech giants Google and Meta over the government's new Online News Act may be at an impasse, the Liberals, the NDP and the Bloc Québécois are expected to present a united front in support of the legislation at a news conference today.

"Canada is standing up to the tech giants for the right reasons," Heritage Minister Pablo Rodriguez said in a media statement. "A free and independent press is fundamental to our democracy."

His office did not say if the government would have anything new to announce at the news conference.

The law compels companies like Google and Meta to pay money to a news organization each time a user accesses a web story through a link on one of their products.

The bill has been pitched as a way to keep news outlets solvent after advertising moved en masse to digital platforms, virtually wiping out a major revenue stream for journalism.

As a news organization, the CBC could see a financial benefit under C-18, which requires the CBC to provide an annual report on any compensation for news it receives from digital operators.


So, in these negotiations, who is negotiating with who??
Good question.
 

55Mercury

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May 31, 2007
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Seems that the whole Trudeau "gang" is totally inept, no matter what Minister and/or department one refers to. They're all having issues. Hmmm, I wonder why? Could it be because they don't know what the hell they're doing? Probably.
when in doubt go with the obvious!
 
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Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
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CBC/Radio-Canada's corporate position is that the Online News Act will help level the playing field (???) and contribute to a healthy news ecosystem in Canada, just like the $BILLION$ Dollar Annual Taxpayer Funding that only CBC/Radio-Canada receives that all other Canadian news outlets do not….
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On a fundamental level, the fight over C-18 isn't really about journalism. It's about power.

The Online News Act passed in June and takes effect later this year. It will obligate tech companies to reach commercial deals with news publishers to share revenue for news stories that appear on their platforms, while those companies that do not link to Canadian news stories are exempt.

Meta has begun blocking Canadian news from its platforms to avoid being subject to the legislation. Google has said it will also block news before the law takes effect, but it has not yet begun to do so.

In a statement Thursday, Meta spokesperson Lisa Laventure said its news blocking would extend to all Canadian users “in the coming weeks.”

“Unfortunately, the regulatory process is not equipped to make changes to the fundamental features of the legislation that have always been problematic, and so we plan to comply by ending news availability in Canada in the coming weeks,” she said.

Google’s president of global affairs, Kent Walker, has said the law “remains unworkable” and that it has yet to see an indication from the government that its “structural issues” can be addressed.

“We have now informed the Government that when the law takes effect, we unfortunately will have to remove links to Canadian news from our Search, News and Discover products in Canada, and that C-18 will also make it untenable for us to continue offering our Google News Showcase product in Canada,” Walker wrote in a recent blog post.

“We’ve met both Google and Meta multiple times to better understand the concerns. We believe we have a path forward and we’re willing to continue talking with the platforms,” Rodriguez said. “We’re convinced what Google is asking at this moment can be done through regulations.”

According to its latest annual report on advertisement spending, the federal government spent over $23 million on ads on Facebook and Instagram between 2020 and 2022, nearly triple what it spent on Twitter ($6.7 million) or Snapchat ($5 million).

The NDP confirmed Wednesday it would continue to buy ads on Facebook and Instagram, whereas the Bloc Québécois said it had cut its advertisements on Meta platforms at the end of June.

The Parliamentary Budget Officer has estimated that under the Online News Act, Google and Meta could end up funding more than 30 per cent of newsroom costs, just under $330 million a year. But if Google and Meta remove news from their platforms, they will no longer be covered under the Online News Act.

Bill C-18 would force Meta and Google to share revenues with Canadian news publishers by reaching commercial deals (Postmedia, publisher of the National Post, is in favour of the bill.) The two tech companies say their main concern with the legislation is that it would effectively force them to pay for online links.

The bill doesn’t specifically name Google and Meta, but it does apply to companies that “make news content available” and have a “significant bargaining power imbalance” with news businesses. If Google and Meta stop making news content available, the bill would no longer apply.

Asked by Simons if that happens, whether the government would then go after other platforms such as Bing or TikTok, Rodriguez indicated that wouldn’t be the case. “We said it clearly in the bill, that they have to be a dominant situation… and actually, in the thresholds we’re looking at, there’s only two. That’s Facebook and Google and the rest are way, way far away.”

So….Facebook & Google…& only them…have had to find a solution and seem to have in response to Bill C-18. What portion of their revenue is derived from sharing links to Canadian News Service links? What portion of their revenues are derived from advertising paid for by Canadian government & Canadian news services. Apparently…not enough to be…C-18’d.

Facebook & Google CAN have links to American (or other) news services about Canadian news stories….avoiding C-18….that Canadians would be able to see. The Canadian government would not be able to manipulate this continent with its funding to ‘select’ Canadian news providers….so would our government then have to start propping up Al Jazeera and the Washington Post, etc…to get the coverage that it wants???

Would the Canadian Government then have to create their own version of Google for Canada (?) regulated by the CRTC of coarse that Canadian news services (the ones with the correct opinions) can be linked from (?) with preferential treatment for select Government broadcasters, etc…???? China already does something like this, so there is a template.
 
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Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
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1688868908195.jpegThe major platforms are annoyed at the Liberals’ Bill C-18, passed just before the House of Commons rose for the summer. The bill, known as the Online News Act, would make platforms such as Facebook and Instagram pay what is effectively a royalty when a Canadian news story gets linked on social media.

The Parliamentary Budget Office (PBO) estimates these royalties would cost social media companies about $100 million a year.

If the platforms were paying for content directly to the newspapers and broadcasters producing it, that would be one thing, but they would pay it to the Liberal government, which would then decide how to divvy it up???

This sounds….Liberal-ish…& puts this more into context….just like the Carbon Tax(s)….

The delusional bit is that Wednesday, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau likened his government’s efforts to extract fees from Big Tech to the Allies’ Second World War efforts to preserve democracy.

“We want to defend democracy,” Trudeau claimed. “This is what we’re doing across the world, such as supporting Ukraine. This is what we did during the Second World War.”

Honestly!? Does the man think Big Government’s fight with Big Tech is the moral equivalent of defending Ukraine from the Russians and liberating Europe from the Nazis?
(Of course, when Trudeau wants to make hipster points with young voters he doesn’t hesitate to use social media to tweet pop singer Taylor Swift and plead with her to bring her current world tour to Canada, which he also did this week. That makes him both a hypocrite and a goof.)

Trudeau may like to portray himself as Winston Churchill in the fight against Big Tech censorship but, in reality, he and his government are nothing but sanctimonious little gnats annoyingly buzzing around the ears of companies such as Twitter, Facebook and others.

And here’s the hypocritical cherry on top: While the Trudeau government has pulled its ads from social media, the Liberal party has not.

Michael Geist, a University of Ottawa law professor who specializes in Internet and e-commerce law, says it’s obvious with the Liberals that “principled opposition ends when there might be a political cost involved.”
CBC/Radio-Canada's corporate position is that the Online News Act will help level the playing field (???) and contribute to a healthy news ecosystem in Canada, just like the $BILLION$ Dollar Annual Taxpayer Funding that only CBC/Radio-Canada receives that all other Canadian news outlets do not….
On the surface, the Liberals’ belief they can use money to force Big Tech to do their bidding is somewhat understandable. The Liberals use this tactic with the CBC all the time. They give the CBC $1.3 billion a year and our state broadcaster happily functions as a mouthpiece for favoured Liberal causes and beliefs. So, it’s easy to see how Ottawa would mistakenly believe it could play a similar financial game with Big Tech.
On a fundamental level, the fight over C-18 isn't really about journalism. It's about power.
The problem, though, is that federal advertising on social media only amounts to $11.4 million a year. That’s just a tiny 0.001% of Meta’s gross income. (Meta owns Facebook, Instagram, WhatsApp and other platforms.)
So….Facebook & Google…& only them…have had to find a solution and seem to have in response to Bill C-18. What portion of their revenue is derived from sharing links to Canadian News Service links? What portion of their revenues are derived from advertising paid for by Canadian government & Canadian news services. Apparently…not enough to be…C-18’d.
And when you do the math, if the social media giants lose $11 million in government advertising while saving $100 million in royalties for news links, they are still coming ahead by nearly $90 million.

The government’s response on Wednesday was to pull all government ads from social media sites…’cuz…’cuz that’ll learn ‘em!!!

Facebook & Google CAN have links to American (or other) news services about Canadian news stories….avoiding C-18….that Canadians would be able to see. The Canadian government would not be able to manipulate this continent with its funding to ‘select’ Canadian news providers….so would our government then have to start propping up Al Jazeera and the Washington Post, etc…to get the coverage that it wants???

The farcical bit is the government’s belief it can pressure Facebook, Instagram, Google and others into bending to the Liberals’ will. The big social media platforms have begun blocking links to Canadian news sources rather than pay the feds’ fees.

Would the Canadian Government then have to create their own version of Google for Canada (?) regulated by the CRTC of coarse that Canadian news services (the ones with the correct opinions) can be linked from (?) with preferential treatment for select Government broadcasters, etc…???? China already does something like this, so there is a template.
 
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Dixie Cup

Senate Member
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View attachment 18686The major platforms are annoyed at the Liberals’ Bill C-18, passed just before the House of Commons rose for the summer. The bill, known as the Online News Act, would make platforms such as Facebook and Instagram pay what is effectively a royalty when a Canadian news story gets linked on social media.

The Parliamentary Budget Office (PBO) estimates these royalties would cost social media companies about $100 million a year.

If the platforms were paying for content directly to the newspapers and broadcasters producing it, that would be one thing, but they would pay it to the Liberal government, which would then decide how to divvy it up???

This sounds….Liberal-ish…& puts this more into context….just like the Carbon Tax(s)….

The delusional bit is that Wednesday, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau likened his government’s efforts to extract fees from Big Tech to the Allies’ Second World War efforts to preserve democracy.

“We want to defend democracy,” Trudeau claimed. “This is what we’re doing across the world, such as supporting Ukraine. This is what we did during the Second World War.”

Honestly!? Does the man think Big Government’s fight with Big Tech is the moral equivalent of defending Ukraine from the Russians and liberating Europe from the Nazis?
(Of course, when Trudeau wants to make hipster points with young voters he doesn’t hesitate to use social media to tweet pop singer Taylor Swift and plead with her to bring her current world tour to Canada, which he also did this week. That makes him both a hypocrite and a goof.)

Trudeau may like to portray himself as Winston Churchill in the fight against Big Tech censorship but, in reality, he and his government are nothing but sanctimonious little gnats annoyingly buzzing around the ears of companies such as Twitter, Facebook and others.

And here’s the hypocritical cherry on top: While the Trudeau government has pulled its ads from social media, the Liberal party has not.

Michael Geist, a University of Ottawa law professor who specializes in Internet and e-commerce law, says it’s obvious with the Liberals that “principled opposition ends when there might be a political cost involved.”

On the surface, the Liberals’ belief they can use money to force Big Tech to do their bidding is somewhat understandable. The Liberals use this tactic with the CBC all the time. They give the CBC $1.3 billion a year and our state broadcaster happily functions as a mouthpiece for favoured Liberal causes and beliefs. So, it’s easy to see how Ottawa would mistakenly believe it could play a similar financial game with Big Tech.

The problem, though, is that federal advertising on social media only amounts to $11.4 million a year. That’s just a tiny 0.001% of Meta’s gross income. (Meta owns Facebook, Instagram, WhatsApp and other platforms.)

And when you do the math, if the social media giants lose $11 million in government advertising while saving $100 million in royalties for news links, they are still coming ahead by nearly $90 million.

The government’s response on Wednesday was to pull all government ads from social media sites…’cuz…’cuz

Facebook & Google CAN have links to American (or other) news services about Canadian news stories….avoiding C-18….that Canadians would be able to see. The Canadian government would not be able to manipulate this continent with its funding to ‘select’ Canadian news providers….so would our government then have to start propping up Al Jazeera and the Washington Post, etc…to get the coverage that it wants???

The farcical bit is the government’s belief it can pressure Facebook, Instagram, Google and others into bending to the Liberals’ will. The big social media platforms have begun blocking links to Canadian news sources rather than pay the feds’ fees.
Do you really think the Libs would distribute the funds equitably? 🤔 I very much doubt it. They'd use the funds to push for their own agendas.
 
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