CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) & Bill C-18

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
24,335
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Regina, Saskatchewan
There is that too but I was thinking the CBC's budget would also expand.
Think of this like a ‘second separate budget’ just like we’ve recently gotten a “second separate carbon tax”….so this might be independent of the CBC’s “other” taxpayer funded budget….& all things have to be ‘administered’ by an ever expanding Liberal Civil Service and that’s not cheap.
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The CBC noted that the Liberal Government’s Ads promoting Canada's 150th anniversary celebrations, annual budgets and outreach to veterans were among the biggest items in the federal government's social media ad spending over the past seven years, a CBC News analysis shows….& at the same time…. Legacy Media is getting bailouts from the Liberal Government …with the CBC getting the Lion’s Share.

The Online News Act compels online media companies like Meta and Google to drop links to Canadian News Services rather than to pay money to news organizations each time a user accesses a story through a link on one of their products.
…& is there a presedent for this with Google & a national boycott of news services? Yep, & Spain is recently back to Google displaying Spanish news links after eight years.

Madrid last year transposed European Union copyright rules, revamped in 2020, into legislation, allowing media outlets to negotiate directly with the tech giant.

The move prompted an announcement from Google last year that it would re-open Google News in the following year. read more

And whom would C-18 actually benefit, if these two online media entities have to pay fees to the government (not the news services), & the government would then decide which news services (after administration fees) where then “worthy” of receiving a portion of what’s left?

Who would it harm the most? It appears not to be these two social media platforms but the Canadian News Services themselves? Is that the desired outcome? Is this a win-win for the Liberal government?
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
24,335
8,704
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
Michael Geist, the University of Ottawa’s Canada research chair in internet law, said “the government appears to have caved on its own legislation.”

“Its planned regulations toss aside the principles it insisted were essential, replaced by government regulations on unique financial thresholds for each platform,” he said.

The federal Heritage Department said in a background paper Monday that the regulations the minister is proposing to the Online News Act would “establish a financial threshold for contributions to sustainability of the Canadian news marketplace.” This would be “based on a platform’s estimated Canadian revenues and would be specific to each platform and their position within the news marketplace.”

“Once finalized, the regulations will make clear which platforms are captured by the Online News Act and what the agreements negotiated between news businesses and platforms must do to get an exemption,” it added.

…And here is the peak behind the “Liberal” curtain as to whom it would spread the balance (after administration fees) of the balance of funds yoinked from the two tech companies:

The regulations would also provide more clarity on how many deals the tech giants would have to make with:
1) local news businesses,
2) Indigenous news outlets and
3) French-language news outlets,
….the Heritage department said in a background paper.

Mr. Geist expressed doubt that the regulations would be enough to keep Meta, which owns Facebook and Instagram, from blocking Canadians’ ability to access and share Canadian news on its platforms.

The government refused to accept amendments addressing the tech giants’ concerns when Bill C-18 was debated in Parliament, but now appears to be softening its position after Google and Facebook threatened to exit Canadian news. The Online News Act will come into effect by the end of the year.

Google declined to comment on the regulations being drafted and whether they would be enough to keep it from blocking searches for Canadian news. Talks took place last week between Google and ministerial staff on Bill C-18 and are continuing.

Meta declined to comment.

Mr. Rodriguez said Monday that he remains optimistic that the tech giants’ concerns can be resolved through regulations, suggesting that Facebook should resume talks.

Google and Facebook have reached a number of voluntary deals with Canadian news organizations, including The Globe, to pay for use of their content.

But Facebook has now written to news publishers it has financial deals with, including The Globe, telling them it is cancelling those agreements at the end of this month in response to the Online News Act.

By blocking links to Canadian news stories, Google and Facebook would no longer be regulated under the act or forced to negotiate deals with publishers.
 
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Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
24,335
8,704
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Regina, Saskatchewan
Regardless of where the dust settles on Canada’s tumultuous battle with Big Tech, the nation’s news industry won’t find stability until its playing field is levelled.

That means ending the CBC’s ability to sell advertising in all of its forms and turning it into a pure play public broadcaster and online news organization.

CBC is not operating – and hasn’t been for years – within its legislated role as Canada’s national radio and television broadcaster. It has expanded into serving as an online newspaper publisher, generating at least $80-million in digital revenue – about 20 per cent of its overall advertising income – in direct competition with Canada’s news publishers. And it’s receiving $1.2-billion in annual federal subsidy to do so.
If Canada’s journalism businesses are to prosper, this distortion of the market, which would be unacceptable in any other industry and is only made worse by the contentious Online News Act, must end.

Broadcasters have complained for decades about the bizarre reality of having their taxes used to support their largest competitor. Their concern has since spread to newspaper publishers, who first raised it publicly in 2016 before the House of Commons Heritage Committee. Unanimous in their condemnation of the CBC’s expansion beyond broadcasting, one described it then as a commercial “uber predator.”

At the time, Mélanie Joly was Minister of Heritage. She did nothing to address the issue. Steven Guilbeault then took on the role and he too avoided dealing with the matter. The current Heritage Minister, Pablo Rodriguez, once indicated he might remove advertising from CBC TV news broadcasts, but has followed the head-in-the-sand approach of his predecessors. And he does this while entangling himself in the barbed wire of the Online News Act, which he has naively promoted as capable of reversing the industry’s fortunes. The time has long passed for him to end the practice of subsidizing one commercial operator at the expense of the nation’s others.

The removal of $400-million of advertising revenue from the CBC, much of which could then be reclaimed by private news organizations, is easily compensated through an offsetting increase in federal funding. And while this might prove to be politically controversial, it is well within the world view of the current government.
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
24,335
8,704
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
Meta has started to run ads to inform Canadians of its plan to block the viewing and sharing of news content on Facebook and Instagram within weeks, but some Quebec radio stations and news publications are refusing to carry them.

It’s the latest development in a tense standoff between Meta and the federal government and supporters of the Online News Act, also known as Bill C-18. The legislation is designed to support the Canadian news industry after much of its advertising migrated to big-tech platforms.

Bill C-18 would make Facebook and Google negotiate deals to compensate news outlets for posting or linking to their work, but the tech giants say it is deeply flawed. By withdrawing news from its platforms, Meta would not be subject to the act.

Meta says the ads are an attempt to be upfront with Canadians, who will find they can no longer share or access Canadian news on Facebook and Instagram within weeks.

“We want to remain clear and transparent with Canadians about the upcoming changes to our services,” said Lisa Laventure, Meta’s spokeswoman in Canada.

“The Online News Act is based on the incorrect premise that social-media companies benefit unfairly from news content shared on our platforms, but the reverse is true. News outlets voluntarily share content on social media to expand their audiences and help their bottom line.

“Unfortunately, the only way we can reasonably comply with this legislation is to end news availability for people in Canada in the coming weeks.” The rest at the below link:
 
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Taxslave2

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We may have to back to the old fashioned method of scanning through all the ads in the online version of news papers to find articles of interest that are not dictated by the liberal party.
 

Dixie Cup

Senate Member
Sep 16, 2006
5,825
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Edmonton
Meta has started to run ads to inform Canadians of its plan to block the viewing and sharing of news content on Facebook and Instagram within weeks, but some Quebec radio stations and news publications are refusing to carry them.

It’s the latest development in a tense standoff between Meta and the federal government and supporters of the Online News Act, also known as Bill C-18. The legislation is designed to support the Canadian news industry after much of its advertising migrated to big-tech platforms.

Bill C-18 would make Facebook and Google negotiate deals to compensate news outlets for posting or linking to their work, but the tech giants say it is deeply flawed. By withdrawing news from its platforms, Meta would not be subject to the act.

Meta says the ads are an attempt to be upfront with Canadians, who will find they can no longer share or access Canadian news on Facebook and Instagram within weeks.

“We want to remain clear and transparent with Canadians about the upcoming changes to our services,” said Lisa Laventure, Meta’s spokeswoman in Canada.

“The Online News Act is based on the incorrect premise that social-media companies benefit unfairly from news content shared on our platforms, but the reverse is true. News outlets voluntarily share content on social media to expand their audiences and help their bottom line.

“Unfortunately, the only way we can reasonably comply with this legislation is to end news availability for people in Canada in the coming weeks.” The rest at the below link:
Well, thankfully I'm on neither platform so I can be ignorant and say that I don't care. Just like people who don't vote & say they don't care & then complain about what is taking place. 😒
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
24,335
8,704
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
The new Heritage Minister, Pascale St-Onge, says she will stand her ground against the tech giants, as Facebook prepares to push the button on its plan to block Canadians’ access to news in response to the Online News Act.

Ms. St-Onge, who took over from Pablo Rodriguez in this week’s cabinet shuffle, steps straight into the fray over Bill C-18, including negotiations with Google, which has also threatened to block Canadians’ ability to search for news.

Concerns were raised Thursday that the government’s position could be weakened with the expected departure of key political staff – who have been negotiating with Google and know the legislation in detail – to the Transport ministry with Mr. Rodriguez because Transport.

Ms. St-Onge, the former sport minister and onetime president of Quebec’s biggest media and cultural-sector union, is being briefed by officials on the Online News Act because Sports.

Meta is expected to block Canadians’ ability to post and share news on Facebook and Instagram within the next week. Google is in the midst of negotiations with the government and has said it too will block access to news unless a “viable” way forward is found through regulations.

Google has complained that the bill is vague on how much platforms would be expected to pay publishers overall, or how many deals it would need to do with them to be exempt from regulation.

In a statement Thursday, Google said it continues to have “significant concerns about structural issues with C-18″ and is still “uncertain they can be sufficiently addressed through regulations.”

“We hope that the government will be able to outline a viable path forward before the law takes effect,” it said.
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
24,335
8,704
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
Meta, the parent company of social media platforms Facebook and Instagram, announced that it would begin the process of blocking all news content from its Canadian users starting Tuesday.

The decision is the climax of a public battle between Ottawa and the tech giant over the Online News Act, originally Bill C-18, which compels both Meta and Google to broker revenue-sharing deals with publishers for use of news content.

In a statement on Tuesday, Meta’s Canadian public policy head Rachel Curran accused the federal government of basing the Online News Act on the false premise that the company “benefits unfairly” from online news content, saying the reverse is actually true.

“News outlets voluntarily share content on Facebook and Instagram to expand their audiences and help their bottom line,” she wrote.

“In contrast, we know the people using our platforms don’t come to us for news.”

The company has said previously that news content was “of low value to Meta and declining.” No access to Canadian based news services on Facebook or Instagram or Google = no financial impact by the Liberal/NDP’s on these very specific companies.

While the legislation makes no specific mention of any companies or online platforms, it is written so that it currently would apply only to Google and Meta.

Estimates provided by the Parliamentary Budget Officer suggest that the law could have resulted in both Google and Meta handing over nearly $330 million annually to publishers…but now that will be zero dollars with the added benefit of Canadian media not expanding their bottom line by expanding their audience. Google has said it will begin blocking news when the law takes effect later this year, but Meta isn’t waiting.

Shortly after the bill became law, Google announced it would scrap existing deals with publishers, explaining the Online News Act would make such deals “untenable.”

It means that Canadian users will not be able to see or share news articles using Facebook or Instagram as of Tuesday. So, there’s no point in sharing this article with your Facebook friends (or any other). It won’t work.
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
24,335
8,704
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
A group of news publishers and broadcasters has asked the Competition Bureau to investigate Meta’s move to block Canadian news content from Facebook and Instagram.

News Media Canada, the Canadian Association of Broadcasters and CBC/Radio-Canada want the Competition Bureau “to use its investigative and prosecutorial tools to protect competition and prohibit Meta from continuing to block Canadians’ access to news content.”

So, get the Competition Bureau to FORCE Meta & Google to post news from Canadian News Services, & get the Liberal/NDP’s to FORCE Meta & Google through C-18 to pay for the privilege of being FORCED to pay for being FORCED to post news from Canadian News Services. Hmmm….why would Meta & Google have an issue with that???

The company began blocking news on its platforms last week in response to the Liberal government’s Online News Act. The law would FORCE Meta and Google to reach commercial deals with news publishers to share revenues for news stories that appear on their platforms.

Removing news from its platforms would mean Meta would no longer be subject to the legislation. Rest at link, etc…

In a press release Tuesday morning, the news publishers accused Meta of abusing its dominant market position.

“Meta’s practices are clearly designed to discipline Canadian news companies, prevent them from participating in and accessing the advertising market, and significantly reduce their visibility to Canadians on social media channels,” they said. “Meta’s anticompetitive conduct, which has attracted the attention of regulators around the world, will strengthen its already dominant position in advertising and social media distribution and harm Canadian journalism.”

They said Meta “effectively has substantial control over access to Canadian news” because Facebook and Instagram combined hold more than 70 per cent of the social media market in Canada.

In their letter to Competition commissioner Matthew Boswell, they said Meta has chosen to harm news organizations, and that its actions threaten the viability of the news industry in Canada.

“Its exclusionary and disciplinary conduct is aimed at preventing or severely limiting Canadian news organizations’ access to a significant portion of their audiences and significantly reducing visits to their news websites and applications,” the news publishers argued. “Through the loss of this critical distribution channel, Canadian news organizations’ ability to earn online advertising revenue from their websites and applications, as well as from their readers, becomes significantly diminished.”

The groups are asking the Competition Bureau to prioritize their “urgent” request.
 
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Dixie Cup

Senate Member
Sep 16, 2006
5,825
3,666
113
Edmonton
A group of news publishers and broadcasters has asked the Competition Bureau to investigate Meta’s move to block Canadian news content from Facebook and Instagram.

News Media Canada, the Canadian Association of Broadcasters and CBC/Radio-Canada want the Competition Bureau “to use its investigative and prosecutorial tools to protect competition and prohibit Meta from continuing to block Canadians’ access to news content.”

So, get the Competition Bureau to FORCE Meta & Google to post news from Canadian News Services, & get the Liberal/NDP’s to FORCE Meta & Google through C-18 to pay for the privilege of being FORCED to pay for being FORCED to post news from Canadian News Services. Hmmm….why would Meta & Google have an issue with that???

The company began blocking news on its platforms last week in response to the Liberal government’s Online News Act. The law would FORCE Meta and Google to reach commercial deals with news publishers to share revenues for news stories that appear on their platforms.

Removing news from its platforms would mean Meta would no longer be subject to the legislation. Rest at link, etc…

In a press release Tuesday morning, the news publishers accused Meta of abusing its dominant market position.

“Meta’s practices are clearly designed to discipline Canadian news companies, prevent them from participating in and accessing the advertising market, and significantly reduce their visibility to Canadians on social media channels,” they said. “Meta’s anticompetitive conduct, which has attracted the attention of regulators around the world, will strengthen its already dominant position in advertising and social media distribution and harm Canadian journalism.”

They said Meta “effectively has substantial control over access to Canadian news” because Facebook and Instagram combined hold more than 70 per cent of the social media market in Canada.

In their letter to Competition commissioner Matthew Boswell, they said Meta has chosen to harm news organizations, and that its actions threaten the viability of the news industry in Canada.

“Its exclusionary and disciplinary conduct is aimed at preventing or severely limiting Canadian news organizations’ access to a significant portion of their audiences and significantly reducing visits to their news websites and applications,” the news publishers argued. “Through the loss of this critical distribution channel, Canadian news organizations’ ability to earn online advertising revenue from their websites and applications, as well as from their readers, becomes significantly diminished.”

The groups are asking the Competition Bureau to prioritize their “urgent” request.
Since they're private companies, can we "compel" them to unblock Canadian news content?