COVID-19 'Pandemic'

Twin_Moose

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In Fiscal Year 2021 The Feds Paid Zero Claims for COVID Vaccine Related Deaths​

By Joe Hoft
Published November 6, 2021 at 5:00pm
178 Comments

In fiscal year 2021, the U.S. government paid $246.9 million in claims for vaccine-related injuries and deaths. Not a single payout was related to Covid-19 vaccines.

Each person with a “provable” injury from a Covid vaccine could claim up to $379,000 from a special Covid vaccine fund set up by the federal government. The payout for death could be as high as $370,376.

However, according to an OpenTheBooks.com investigation, the federal government didn’t pay a penny for Covid-vaccine claims. The special fund for these claims is called the Countermeasures Injury Compensation Program (CICP).

There were only 1,357 claims filed that alleged “injuries/deaths from the Covid vaccines,” and 53 were listed as deaths, according to recent reporting by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

By contrast, the self-reporting Vaccine Adverse Reporting System (VAERS) lists 16,310 deaths related to Covid vaccines. Of these, “5,326 of the deaths occurred on Day 0, 1,or 2 following vaccination[.]”
 

Twin_Moose

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spaminator

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Subtype of COVID-19 Delta variant spreading in Western Canada: Health officials
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Mickey Djuric
Publishing date:Nov 11, 2021 • 19 hours ago • 2 minute read • 8 Comments
This illustration shows the novel coronavirus.
This illustration shows the novel coronavirus. PHOTO BY FILE PHOTO /Getty Images
Article content
REGINA — A subtype of the COVID-19 variant is becoming predominant in Saskatchewan and is spreading throughout Western Canada, but health officials say it is not considered a variant of concern.

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The AY.25.1 subtype likely originated in the mid-western United States where it mutated, said Dr. Jessica Minion, a Saskatchewan Health Authority medical microbiologist who presented the information to a health authority meeting last week.


In Saskatchewan, AY-25.1 and another subtype, AY.27, have mainly displaced the original Delta variant. AY-25.1 is also spreading interprovincially in Alberta and British Columbia.

Health officials across Western Canada say the subtype is not more contagious.

“There is no evidence it causes more severe illness, that it evades vaccine protection, that it is significantly different from the Delta variant that has been circulating,” said Dr. Deena Hinshaw, Alberta’s chief medical officer of health, during a COVID-19 briefing.

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“When viruses replicate, they can change their genetics slightly, so sometimes you have these sublineages that evolve. But that doesn’t necessarily mean that they behave differently from that parent strain, and that’s the case with this particular sublineage.”

Dr. Saqib Shahab, Saskatchewan’s chief medical health officer, said the public shouldn’t read too much into the subtype.

“What we’re seeing is something all jurisdictions see,” Shahab said.

“If there are any concerning trends that emerge, we’ll bring that back to the public.”


Minion, who is a member of the Pan-Canadian Public Health Network, said the Delta variant has been branching out into new evolutionary trees across the world including the United States, the United Kingdom and Asia.

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“These evolutionary trees, which are still Delta, we are calling them AY-various numbers,” Minion said.

“Having these different AY lineages does not necessarily imply any biological differences when we determine it’s a new lineage. All we’re saying is there are stable new sequences in the viral code that have accumulated enough to make it noticeably different than what came before it.”

Saskatchewan is monitoring the sublineage as is required by international health regulations, but health officials reiterate it’s normal biology.

“Viruses don’t stay static, especially COVID, which is given trillions of opportunities on a daily basis to evolve and mutate,” Minion said.

She said it’s difficult for epidemiologists to sort out why AY.25.1 has become predominant in Saskatchewan.

Minion said the subtype could have more adventitious mutations that are making it more transmissible. Or it could be “pure chance” because the virus could be benefiting from getting into a population that was largely unvaccinated and got into a superspreader event.

Shahab said while AY.25.1 has been observed, it would need to correlate to what health officials are seeing in terms of cases, hospitalizations and deaths to be a concern.

“While we are watching this very closely, the principles remain the same; make sure you’re vaccinated … follow public health measures.”
 
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petros

The Central Scrutinizer
Nov 21, 2008
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Subtype of COVID-19 Delta variant spreading in Western Canada: Health officials
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Mickey Djuric
Publishing date:Nov 11, 2021 • 19 hours ago • 2 minute read • 8 Comments
This illustration shows the novel coronavirus.
This illustration shows the novel coronavirus. PHOTO BY FILE PHOTO /Getty Images
Article content
REGINA — A subtype of the COVID-19 variant is becoming predominant in Saskatchewan and is spreading throughout Western Canada, but health officials say it is not considered a variant of concern.

Advertisement
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

Article content
The AY.25.1 subtype likely originated in the mid-western United States where it mutated, said Dr. Jessica Minion, a Saskatchewan Health Authority medical microbiologist who presented the information to a health authority meeting last week.


In Saskatchewan, AY-25.1 and another subtype, AY.27, have mainly displaced the original Delta variant. AY-25.1 is also spreading interprovincially in Alberta and British Columbia.

Health officials across Western Canada say the subtype is not more contagious.

“There is no evidence it causes more severe illness, that it evades vaccine protection, that it is significantly different from the Delta variant that has been circulating,” said Dr. Deena Hinshaw, Alberta’s chief medical officer of health, during a COVID-19 briefing.

Advertisement
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

Article content
“When viruses replicate, they can change their genetics slightly, so sometimes you have these sublineages that evolve. But that doesn’t necessarily mean that they behave differently from that parent strain, and that’s the case with this particular sublineage.”

Dr. Saqib Shahab, Saskatchewan’s chief medical health officer, said the public shouldn’t read too much into the subtype.

“What we’re seeing is something all jurisdictions see,” Shahab said.

“If there are any concerning trends that emerge, we’ll bring that back to the public.”


Minion, who is a member of the Pan-Canadian Public Health Network, said the Delta variant has been branching out into new evolutionary trees across the world including the United States, the United Kingdom and Asia.

Advertisement
STORY CONTINUES BELOW

Article content
“These evolutionary trees, which are still Delta, we are calling them AY-various numbers,” Minion said.

“Having these different AY lineages does not necessarily imply any biological differences when we determine it’s a new lineage. All we’re saying is there are stable new sequences in the viral code that have accumulated enough to make it noticeably different than what came before it.”

Saskatchewan is monitoring the sublineage as is required by international health regulations, but health officials reiterate it’s normal biology.

“Viruses don’t stay static, especially COVID, which is given trillions of opportunities on a daily basis to evolve and mutate,” Minion said.

She said it’s difficult for epidemiologists to sort out why AY.25.1 has become predominant in Saskatchewan.

Minion said the subtype could have more adventitious mutations that are making it more transmissible. Or it could be “pure chance” because the virus could be benefiting from getting into a population that was largely unvaccinated and got into a superspreader event.

Shahab said while AY.25.1 has been observed, it would need to correlate to what health officials are seeing in terms of cases, hospitalizations and deaths to be a concern.

“While we are watching this very closely, the principles remain the same; make sure you’re vaccinated … follow public health measures.”
Who really believes they are doing "variant" testing?
 
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Twin_Moose

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Twin Moose Creek

Cardiologist Who Said He ‘Won’t Cry at Funeral’ For “Selfish” Unvaccinated People Suddenly Dies in His Sleep 2 Weeks After 3rd Covid Jab

By Cristina Laila
Published November 11, 2021 at 10:42pm
1609 Comments

From the article

CBC News reported:

A prominent New Brunswick cardiologist has died, leaving behind a large gap in the system and the community, colleagues say.
Dr. Sohrab Lutchmedial dedicated more than 20 years to the New Brunswick Heart Centre and the care of patients suffering from heart disease, said a statement from the staff of the New Brunswick Heart Centre.

“It is with profound sadness that we report the sudden and unexpected death of a colleague, friend, father, partner and inspiring spirit,” the statement says.

Lutchmedial died Monday in his sleep at his Saint John home, said Jean-François Légaré, the head of cardiac surgery at the New Brunswick Heart Centre. He was 52.
 

Tecumsehsbones

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The three big cats delighted visitors to the Nebraska zoo for years — pouncing on pumpkins during Halloween, preening for pictures and lounging on rocks in their enclosure.

The Lincoln Children’s Zoo has described the snow leopards as silly, bubbly and handsome. They were one of the zoo’s main attractions, delivering a dose of mountain majesty to the Great Plains.

But on Friday, the zoo announced that the leopards — Everest, Makalu and Ranney — had died of complications from covid-19, about one month after the animals had tested positive for the coronavirus. While scientists are still studying the effects of the virus on animals, members of several species have been infected and died in zoos around the world. Snow leopards are considered vulnerable to extinction, with just a few thousand estimated to be living in the wild.
 

B00Mer

This is the way
Sep 6, 2008
39,835
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Canada
The three big cats delighted visitors to the Nebraska zoo for years — pouncing on pumpkins during Halloween, preening for pictures and lounging on rocks in their enclosure.

The Lincoln Children’s Zoo has described the snow leopards as silly, bubbly and handsome. They were one of the zoo’s main attractions, delivering a dose of mountain majesty to the Great Plains.

But on Friday, the zoo announced that the leopards — Everest, Makalu and Ranney — had died of complications from covid-19, about one month after the animals had tested positive for the coronavirus. While scientists are still studying the effects of the virus on animals, members of several species have been infected and died in zoos around the world. Snow leopards are considered vulnerable to extinction, with just a few thousand estimated to be living in the wild.

Yes deer are testing for COVID-19 now..

The deer could not be happier..

Just wait until it infects the food supply, beef, dairy, pork..

Explains why China is telling their people to start hoarding food.. somebody knows something the would is yet to learn..

It explains why they are testing my loads several times, before I leave the USA and CIFA in Canada..