Canada-China Crisis

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
15,807
1,211
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
China is threatening Canada again today, and also threatening Britain and also threatening Australia and so on and so forth. I think they might even be threatening Japan today also for some variety... And you can pick whatever reason you would like today for the threats. Covid 19 inquiry. Huawei. Because it’s Monday...etc....
 

pgs

Hall of Fame Member
Nov 29, 2008
22,125
3,234
113
B.C.
China is threatening Canada again today, and also threatening Britain and also threatening Australia and so on and so forth. I think they might even be threatening Japan today also for some variety... And you can pick whatever reason you would like today for the threats. Covid 19 inquiry. Huawei. Because it’s Monday...etc....
But only our government cares . Why is that ?
 

Ron in Regina

"Voice of the West" Party
Apr 9, 2008
15,807
1,211
113
Regina, Saskatchewan
But only our government cares . Why is that ?
Because Justin is just so much more WOKE than the other 194 world leaders and needs to make that known to anyone who will still listen, & damn the torpedo’s and the Canadian public. “ Look at me and how WOKE I am, and look at my socks and how WOKE they are!!! But don’t look at my groping scandals and the SNC Lavolin scandal, or how I’ve completely screwed over Western Canada because they just aren’t WOKE enough. Look at me run the country from my door stoop, But don’t listen to anybody trying to tell you that Parliament is safe but protest crowds aren’t, ‘cuz selfies in parliament are not as cool as selfie’s of me harvesting broccoli with a machete and a mask!!!”

This is not about whether or not our government cares. This is about self-promotion by Justin Trudeau and that’s about it. Justin Trudeau is padding his WOKE Resume for some future office for after he is out of from the Prime Minister‘s office. I have no idea what that is at this point but it’s either with a large charity or something to do with that UN stink hole as my best guess. Maybe an American talk show, but more scripted?
 

Mowich

Hall of Fame Member
Dec 25, 2005
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Eagle Creek
 

Ocean Breeze

Hall of Fame Member
Jun 5, 2005
18,349
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China is threatening Canada again today, and also threatening Britain and also threatening Australia and so on and so forth. I think they might even be threatening Japan today also for some variety... And you can pick whatever reason you would like today for the threats. Covid 19 inquiry. Huawei. Because it’s Monday...etc....
China is under a great deal of pressure...(as it should be)......and is "acting out"..........in all directions. It is not being very dignified......

The more scattered threats........ the more questionable they are. the world is suffering due to a virus that came from their country........ where they lost control of it.
 

NZDoug

Council Member
Jul 18, 2017
1,895
31
48
Big Bay, Awhitu, New Zealand
Something must be in the wind if the Canadian Press is putting out a hit piece
U.S. left out key statements by Huawei executive in extradition request: lawyer
This might have something to do with it.
A bit gobbley gook but the US Pentagon want to use Huawei.
Confusion reigns as usual.
......................................
Pentagon wins brief waiver from government’s Huawei ban
......................................
WASHINGTON ― The Trump administration is granting the Pentagon a temporary waiver of government-wide ban on contractors using Huawei and other Chinese-made telecommunications equipment, according to a memo obtained by Defense News.
The move offers a weeks-long reprieve, until Sept. 30, for firms doing business with the Department of Defense. The firms are among those still reeling from the economic effects of the coronavirus pandemic and who lobbied for more time to comply with new far-reaching regulations.
The original provision was to take effect Aug. 13. The administration had been finalizing regulations that would prohibit government contracting with companies whose supply chains contain products from five Chinese companies including Huawei, as mandated under of Section 889 of the 2019 National Defense Authorization Act.
The administration, confronting China on trade and a host of issues, has deemed Huawei an espionage threat.
Citing U.S. national security interests, Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe granted the Pentagon a temporary waiver to further assess a broader waiver request from DoD. The action came in a memo to Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment Ellen Lord.
The temporary waiver Lord sought was so DoD could continue to execute procurement actions that would, in part, equip and feed troops.
“You stated that DoD’s statutory requirement to provide for the military forces needed to deter war and protect the security of out country is Contractors had been confused over an interim acquisition rule, agencies cannot award new contracts, task orders or modify existing contracts to any vendor who doesn’t self-certify that they are not using products from Chinese companies like ZTE and Huawei, the Federal News Network reported this week.
Ratcliffe’s memo is a win, albeit a temporary one, for defense contractors and trade associations representing them. They had hoped for a legislative fix in a new pandemic relief package ― but larger bipartisan talks had broken down.
It is critically important to national security,” Ratcliffe said. “Therefore, the procurement of goods and services in support of DoD’s statutory mission is also in the national security interests of the United States.”
While considering the broader waiver, Ratcliffe asked Lord share more information about potential increased risks, mitigation measures and a plan to contract with alternatives to the banned Chinese companies.
Contractors had been confused over an interim acquisition rule, agencies cannot award new contracts, task orders or modify existing contracts to any vendor who doesn’t self-certify that they are not using products from Chinese companies like ZTE and Huawei, the Federal News Network reported this week.
Ratcliffe’s memo is a win, albeit a temporary one, for defense contractors and trade associations representing them. They had hoped for a legislative fix in a new pandemic relief package ― but larger bipartisan talks had broken down.
The leaders of the National Defense Industrial Association and the Professional Services Council had called for the deadline for 889 implementation to move. They argued the focus should be on recovering from the fallout caused by the COVID-19 crisis. And citing the far-reaching implications of the government’s rules, NDIA said companies should get a yearlong extension.
In May, Lord told lawmakers that contractors needed more time to comply with the government-wide ban or risk throwing the defense industrial base into disarray.
“The thought that somebody in six or seven levels down in the supply chain could have one camera in a parking lot and that would invalidate one of our major primes being able to do business with us gives us a bit of pause,” Lord testified at a House Armed Services Committee hearing.
https://www.defensenews.com/congres...ins-brief-waiver-from-governments-huawei-ban/
 

Twin_Moose

Hall of Fame Member
Apr 17, 2017
18,429
4,173
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Twin Moose Creek
Do you think that is why this story was planted in a Canadian newspaper to show Canada was used for as a patsy? I think they are trying to get feedback from Canadians to see if they buy the BS if they let her free.
 

Hoid

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 15, 2017
20,408
2
36
This might have something to do with it.
A bit gobbley gook but the US Pentagon want to use Huawei.
Confusion reigns as usual.
......................................
Pentagon wins brief waiver from government’s Huawei ban
......................................
WASHINGTON ― The Trump administration is granting the Pentagon a temporary waiver of government-wide ban on contractors using Huawei and other Chinese-made telecommunications equipment, according to a memo obtained by Defense News.
The move offers a weeks-long reprieve, until Sept. 30, for firms doing business with the Department of Defense. The firms are among those still reeling from the economic effects of the coronavirus pandemic and who lobbied for more time to comply with new far-reaching regulations.
The original provision was to take effect Aug. 13. The administration had been finalizing regulations that would prohibit government contracting with companies whose supply chains contain products from five Chinese companies including Huawei, as mandated under of Section 889 of the 2019 National Defense Authorization Act.
The administration, confronting China on trade and a host of issues, has deemed Huawei an espionage threat.
Citing U.S. national security interests, Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe granted the Pentagon a temporary waiver to further assess a broader waiver request from DoD. The action came in a memo to Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment Ellen Lord.
The temporary waiver Lord sought was so DoD could continue to execute procurement actions that would, in part, equip and feed troops.
“You stated that DoD’s statutory requirement to provide for the military forces needed to deter war and protect the security of out country is Contractors had been confused over an interim acquisition rule, agencies cannot award new contracts, task orders or modify existing contracts to any vendor who doesn’t self-certify that they are not using products from Chinese companies like ZTE and Huawei, the Federal News Network reported this week.
Ratcliffe’s memo is a win, albeit a temporary one, for defense contractors and trade associations representing them. They had hoped for a legislative fix in a new pandemic relief package ― but larger bipartisan talks had broken down.
It is critically important to national security,” Ratcliffe said. “Therefore, the procurement of goods and services in support of DoD’s statutory mission is also in the national security interests of the United States.”
While considering the broader waiver, Ratcliffe asked Lord share more information about potential increased risks, mitigation measures and a plan to contract with alternatives to the banned Chinese companies.
Contractors had been confused over an interim acquisition rule, agencies cannot award new contracts, task orders or modify existing contracts to any vendor who doesn’t self-certify that they are not using products from Chinese companies like ZTE and Huawei, the Federal News Network reported this week.
Ratcliffe’s memo is a win, albeit a temporary one, for defense contractors and trade associations representing them. They had hoped for a legislative fix in a new pandemic relief package ― but larger bipartisan talks had broken down.
The leaders of the National Defense Industrial Association and the Professional Services Council had called for the deadline for 889 implementation to move. They argued the focus should be on recovering from the fallout caused by the COVID-19 crisis. And citing the far-reaching implications of the government’s rules, NDIA said companies should get a yearlong extension.
In May, Lord told lawmakers that contractors needed more time to comply with the government-wide ban or risk throwing the defense industrial base into disarray.
“The thought that somebody in six or seven levels down in the supply chain could have one camera in a parking lot and that would invalidate one of our major primes being able to do business with us gives us a bit of pause,” Lord testified at a House Armed Services Committee hearing.
https://www.defensenews.com/congres...ins-brief-waiver-from-governments-huawei-ban/
Your information is in the possession of many companies and agencies. They know who you are at the US border. They know if you got busted for a joint in 1978. Since they have all your health and personal data anyone who can hack them also has it and has passed it on to whoever else wants it. They are not hard to hack and nobody else is either. CRA got hacked this week. Twice.

Hack affected email addresses, direct deposit details and fraudulently issued CERB payments

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/canada-revenue-agency-cra-cyberattack-1.5688163

5,500 Canadians had their data stolen and there are 5,500 phony cerb claims on there way somewhere.
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
29,569
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Michael Kovrig, Michael Spavor to face first trial 'soon': Chinese media report
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Stephanie Levitz
Publishing date:Mar 11, 2021 • 7 hours ago • 1 minute read • comment bubble23 Comments
Michael Kovrig, left, and Michael Spavor.
Michael Kovrig, left, and Michael Spavor. PHOTO BY FILE PHOTOS /Postmedia Network
Article content
OTTAWA — A state-affiliated publication in China says two Canadian men will “soon” receive their first trial after more than two years in detention.

But a spokesperson for Global Affairs Canada says Canadian diplomats have not been notified of any court hearings and are not aware of any set timelines for trials.


Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor were detained in December 2018 in apparent retaliation for Canada’s arrest of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou on an extradition request from the United States.

They have been in custody since, held on what the Canadian government and observers have described as bogus charges aimed at putting pressure on Canada to release Meng.

Earlier Thursday, the editor-in-chief of the Global Times, an English-language newspaper affiliated with the Chinese Communist Party, posted on his social media account he’s been told trials will be conducted soon.

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The plight of the two Michaels, as they are known, has been taken up by several of Canada’s allies, including U.S. President Joe Biden, who recently pledged his support to help free the two men.
 

spaminator

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Oct 26, 2009
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RCMP receives hundreds of tips on Chinese agents' activities
Author of the article:postmedia News
Publishing date:Mar 12, 2021 • 20 hours ago • 2 minute read • comment bubble7 Comments
A cat keeps watch next to a mural showing an image of the Chinese Communist Party's emblem along a street in Shanghai, China September 25, 2019.
A cat keeps watch next to a mural showing an image of the Chinese Communist Party's emblem along a street in Shanghai, China September 25, 2019. PHOTO BY ALY SONG /REUTERS
Article content
The RCMP reportedly receive more than 100 calls daily from tipsters on the alleged activities of agents from the Communist Party of China.

In a Commons Special Committee on Canada-China Relations meeting on Thursday, Commissioner Brenda Lucki said the RCMP receives an average of 120 tips a day and they “follow up, obviously, with all of them,” according to Blacklock’s Reporter.


During questioning, Bloc Quebecois MP Stephane Bergeron asked if there was an 800 number Canadians could call if they are subjected to pressure from the People’s Republic of China.

Lucki said the number (1-800-420-5805) is displayed on both the RCMP’s main and national security websites respectively.

“We find, it is probably noteworthy, as the volume of tips increases the threat percentages significantly decline,” said Lucki. “Some of it is just information that people might feel. They might feel, for example, a threat and if it doesn’t meet the threshold of a criminal offence, then we normally can’t deal with it.”

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Conservative MP John Williamson asked Lucki whether the tendency of activities were more likely to come from a “diplomatic mission, a visitor or a citizen.”

The commissioner said even if the RCMP had that info she couldn’t share it with him.

On Nov. 16, 2020, the Department of Immigration told the committee it didn’t keep track of suspected Communist Party agents who posed as students, tourists or workers in Canada, noting the department doesn’t have investigative powers.

The country’s members of parliament cited specific 2019 incidents, such as McMaster University’s ban of the Students Scholars Association, which is suspected of hectoring Uygur Moslem students on campus; as well as death threats received by a Tibetan-Canadian after their election as student union president at the University of Toronto Scarborough Campus.


“We all know China is conducting covert and subversive operations in Canada,” Conservative MP Michael Chong said.

On Nov. 9, 2020, Victor Ho, retired editor of Canadian Chinese-language newspaper Sing Tao, testified Communist Party agents were “trying to intimidate people” in the Chinese-Canadian community.

Ho said there needs to be safeguards to ensure communities aren’t being infiltrated and brainwashed into “accepting the policies of the Communist Party of China.”
1615668137318.png
 

spaminator

Hall of Fame Member
Oct 26, 2009
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'Two Michaels' detained in China have hearings Friday and Monday: Garneau
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Publishing date:Mar 17, 2021 • 14 hours ago • 1 minute read • comment bubble19 Comments
Michael Kovrig, left, and Michael Spavor.
Michael Kovrig, left, and Michael Spavor. PHOTO BY FILE PHOTOS /Postmedia Network
Article content
WASHINGTON — The federal government says Michael Spavor and Michael Kovrig, who have been in custody in China for more than two years, will have court hearings in the coming days.

Foreign Affairs Minister Marc Garneau says the Canadian Embassy in Beijing was notified today that Spavor’s court hearing will take place Friday and Kovrig’s will happen Monday.


He says their detentions are “arbitrary” and that Canada continues to work “tirelessly” to secure their release.


The two Canadian men, known to many around the world simply as “the two Michaels,” were detained in December 2018.

Their cases have been widely linked to Canada’s decision to detain Huawei chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou on behalf of the U.S. Department of Justice.

The controversy has been taken up by several of Canada’s allies, including U.S. President Joe Biden, who recently pledged his support to help free the two men.
 

spaminator

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Oct 26, 2009
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China says case of two Michaels handled 'in accordance with the law'
Author of the article:Canadian Press
Canadian Press
Publishing date:Mar 18, 2021 • 1 day ago • 4 minute read • comment bubble27 Comments
Louis Huang of Vancouver Freedom and Democracy for China holds a photo of Canadians Michael Spavor and Michael Kovrig, who are being detained by China, outside B.C. Supreme Court, in Vancouver, March 6, 2019.
Louis Huang of Vancouver Freedom and Democracy for China holds a photo of Canadians Michael Spavor and Michael Kovrig, who are being detained by China, outside B.C. Supreme Court, in Vancouver, March 6, 2019. PHOTO BY JASON REDMOND /AFP via Getty Images / Files
Article content
WASHINGTON — China’s foreign ministry denied any wrongdoing Thursday in their handling of detained Canadians Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor, attributing the timing of their trials to little more than coincidence.

Global Affairs Canada only learned Wednesday that Spavor’s court hearing would proceed on Friday — one day after closely watched high-level meetings between U.S. and Chinese officials in Alaska.


A hearing for Kovrig, a former Canadian diplomat, has been scheduled for Monday.

“It is not linked to China-U.S. high-level strategic dialogue,” Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian told a media briefing.

He insisted that their cases have been handled “in accordance with the law” and “the lawful rights of the individuals concerned.”

Canada, however, disagrees, calling their detention “arbitrary” and accusing China of a lack of transparency.


The timing, however, was indeed curious: after more than two years in custody and little hint about when they might stand trial, Beijing abruptly notified the Canadian Embassy on Wednesday that hearings were imminent.

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They come on the heels of Thursday’s meetings in Anchorage, where U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken and National Security Adviser Jake Sullivan were sitting down with their Chinese counterparts in an effort to reset relations between the two countries.

State Department spokesperson Janina Porter promised a “frank conversation” calling out China’s defiance of global commitments, undermining of the rules-based international order and challenge to American values.

By early accounts, it lived up to the billing.

What was supposed to be a staid exchange of two-minute statements for the benefit of gathered journalists instead turned into a protracted airing of grievances, with Chinese Communist Party foreign affairs chief Yang Jiechi spending more than 15 minutes denigrating what he characterized as U.S. hypocrisy when it comes to promoting Western values.

“We believe that it is important for the United States to change its own image and to stop advancing its own democracy in the rest of the world,” Yang said.

“Many people within the United States actually have little confidence in the democracy of the United States.”


In Washington, the State Department accused the Chinese delegation of “grandstanding” and preferring “public theatrics and dramatics over substance.”

Earlier Thursday, observers cautioned Canadians against putting too much faith in the meeting — a perspective that appeared likely to be borne out, if the tenor of the opening remarks was any indication.

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Still, both Blinken and President Joe Biden had promised to make the plight of the two men — known increasingly around the world as the “two Michaels” — a priority in their discussions with China.

They have been in custody since December 2018, shortly after Canada arrested Huawei chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou at the behest of the U.S. Department of Justice.

Canada has been caught in the middle of a trilateral diplomatic tug of war ever since.

“As facts have fully proven, this is a political incident from the very beginning,” Zhao said.

“We urge the U.S. side to correct its mistake without further delay and ensure Ms. Meng’s safe return to China at an early date.”


He also insisted that when it comes to the two Michaels, China has respected the terms of two key agreements — the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations and the China-Canada Consular Agreement.

International Crisis Group, a non-governmental agency where Kovrig worked, issued a statement Thursday to mark the news of the pending trial.

“From the moment he was detained, the political nature of his case has been clear,” said interim president Richard Atwood.

“After 830 days imprisoned, Michael should be released immediately so he can return home to his loved ones.”

Comfort Ero, the group’s interim vice-president, called the trial “just another arbitrary political action masked as legal process.”

Foreign Affairs Minister Marc Garneau said Canada is working “tirelessly” to secure the release of the two men, and has asked for continued consular access as well as the opportunity to attend the hearings.

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“Canadian officials will continue to provide consular support to these men and their families during this unacceptable ordeal.”

China was expected to use Thursday’s meeting to ask the U.S. to lift sanctions imposed by the former Trump administration on certain Chinese nationals and entities, including Huawei.

Meng is facing fraud and conspiracy charges linked to what prosecutors say was an elaborate effort to evade American sanctions against Iran. Justice Department officials have refused to say much about the case beyond the fact that they continue to seek her extradition to the U.S.

Critics and allies alike have described the detention of Kovrig and Spavor as retribution for Canada’s role in detaining Meng, and experts see little hope for their release so long as she continues to face charges.

Blinken and Biden both recently spoke up for the pair, part of an ongoing reset of Canada-U.S. relations in the post-Trump era.

“Human beings are not bartering chips,” Biden said following a virtual summit with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau last month.

That same week, Blinken pledged “absolute solidarity” with Canada after his own virtual conference with Garneau and a host of other Canadian officials, including Kirsten Hillman, Canada’s ambassador to the U.S.

Blinken also cheered the Declaration Against Arbitrary Detention in State-to-State Relations, a Canadian initiative comprising a coalition of more than 50 countries opposed to the state-sponsored political detention of foreign nationals.